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Simon Wolfe

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2,326
Sunnyvale, CA
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Simon
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Wolfe
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In my efforts to be a good Overlander and Land Rover owner I go out to do the preventive maintenance on Oliver. I pop the bonnet and do a visual inspection and start checking fluids. At this point I discover that the coolant is down fairly low. I top it off and then start it up and fiddle with the trimming a bit as it seems to be slightly off. I finish that, then walk to the front of Oliver and notice that I'm standing in a puddle... The good news, I found out why my coolant was low. The bad news, I have to fetch out the radiator and see about getting it repaired.

Ah the joys of owning an older car.
 

pl626

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McLean, VA
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Check the state of your hoses as well. It may be time to replace them as well. If the old ones aren't currently leaking, you'll have spares...


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Simon Wolfe

Rank V
Member

Member II

2,326
Sunnyvale, CA
First Name
Simon
Last Name
Wolfe
Member #

4052

Check the state of your hoses as well. It may be time to replace them as well. If the old ones aren't currently leaking, you'll have spares...


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Thanks for the tip. The hoses are fairly new. Oliver sat in a driveway for may years before I got it and we had to put a bunch of work into it to make it roadworthy again. As long as the radiator is out I'm also going to upgrade to an alternator, Oliver still has the old 30 amp generator which is barely enough to run the car let alone extra lights or radios. I'm also going to be into it for a clutch soon.
 

Overlanding Downunder

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Colin
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Oliver sat in a driveway for may years before I got it and we had to put a bunch of work into it to make it roadworthy again. As long as the radiator is out I'm also going to ...
Simon, I do not know your mechanical experience, so please only take this a suggestion as you may have already it. Do you know if there was any rubbish/rust in the radiator? It maybe worth giving the block a good flush with the hose before putting the radiator back in as well. Do not forget to turn the heater on to flush that core as well.

Since Oliver was sitting for a while and the radiator is out, do you think it is worth checking the water pump. That is if has not already been done in your "bunch of work" :smile:. I have found in my experience with old vehicles that the water pump seals deteriorate.

Colin
 

Simon Wolfe

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2,326
Sunnyvale, CA
First Name
Simon
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Wolfe
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4052

Simon, I do not know your mechanical experience, so please only take this a suggestion as you may have already it. Do you know if there was any rubbish/rust in the radiator? It maybe worth giving the block a good flush with the hose before putting the radiator back in as well. Do not forget to turn the heater on to flush that core as well.

Since Oliver was sitting for a while and the radiator is out, do you think it is worth checking the water pump. That is if has not already been done in your "bunch of work" :smile:. I have found in my experience with old vehicles that the water pump seals deteriorate.

Colin
Hey Colin, that is a good idea. We flushed it once but the "soup" was still pretty thick when I empties it today. The other thing I'm starting to think of is whether or not to replace the water pump. it is not show any signs of trouble but the job would be so easy now that the radiator is out of the way.
 

Simon Wolfe

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Well here it is. The job wasn't too bad. I did reaffirm a few things about turning wrenches: 1) the bolt or screw that is stuck will be in the hardest to reach spot. 2) in order to remove the broken part you need to remove at least 5 good parts. 3) I am still a proud member of the Bloody Knuckles Brotherhood.
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Overlanding Downunder

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Colin
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When I flushed radiators and engine blocks back in the 80’s. I would put the water hose and air hose into the old radiator hose and seal it with a rag. I would put my other hand over the outlet and block it. Using you hand would not cause damage as you could only hold a small amount of pressure. Using a little air pressure would give the water that extra boost.

I think you can buy specialized tools to do this now.

If the money is available, I would replace the water pump now. As you said "...but the job would be so easy now that the radiator is out of the way." Think of how hard it would be to replace it on the track while Overlanding, and you have that little voice in the back of you head say "why didn't I replace that while I had the radiator out" :smirk:

Colin
 

Anders0nic

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Benicia, CA
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Anderson
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Hopefully that radiator can be refurbished. If it is not the case, please don't replace it with anything other than a good copper/brass OEM unit. These new plastic/aluminum hybrid radiators have a very short lifespan...
 

bajatacoguy

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John
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Check the state of your hoses as well. It may be time to replace them as well. If the old ones aren't currently leaking, you'll have spares...


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Change them with the radiator!


—————————

Hey Now!

#3533
 

Simon Wolfe

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Member II

2,326
Sunnyvale, CA
First Name
Simon
Last Name
Wolfe
Member #

4052

When I flushed radiators and engine blocks back in the 80’s. I would put the water hose and air hose into the old radiator hose and seal it with a rag. I would put my other hand over the outlet and block it. Using you hand would not cause damage as you could only hold a small amount of pressure. Using a little air pressure would give the water that extra boost.

I think you can buy specialized tools to do this now.

If the money is available, I would replace the water pump now. As you said "...but the job would be so easy now that the radiator is out of the way." Think of how hard it would be to replace it on the track while Overlanding, and you have that little voice in the back of you head say "why didn't I replace that while I had the radiator out" :smirk:

Colin
I'll have to pull the thermostat when is new, but that isn't too hard. I'm sure it could use a good flushing out. I think I will replace the water pump, the "old" one can always go into the emergency spares box.
 

Simon Wolfe

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Member II

2,326
Sunnyvale, CA
First Name
Simon
Last Name
Wolfe
Member #

4052

Hopefully that radiator can be refurbished. If it is not the case, please don't replace it with anything other than a good copper/brass OEM unit. These new plastic/aluminum hybrid radiators have a very short lifespan...
I'm hoping so as well. the older ones are sure better that the new stuff. You figure this one lasted 55 years. The replacement radiators for the old series Rovers are OK from what I hear.
 
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TreXTerra

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Advocate II

2,779
Salt Lake City, Utah
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There are high performance all-aluminum radiators now that will out last and out perform the cheaper plastic-aluminum ones.

I plan to put one in the Xterra when the time comes.
 

Ironhide Fx4

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Im just curious. Where could you find a usable OEM radiator for this rig? It would seem very difficult. I dont know old Land Rovers at all.