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MidOH

Rank IV

Off-Road Ranger I

1,298
Mid Ohio
First Name
John
Last Name
Clark
Ham Callsign
YourHighness
I hate when I see photos of camping next to a lake. The rule is 100ft from any water source, I see other than that here all the time. I leave it alone, I don’t see many changing their mind because of social media. When I do point something out it tends to be a education sandwich, complement, suggest the change, complement. It’s a lot easier to help people when you do attack.
California nonsense. We not only camp by the lake, we camp on it. Sometimes on the beach to.

Mask use, is public indoors here. A placebo to get people to feel safe about going back to work. I go along with it as a courtesy at a grocery store or whatever. Outdoors, nobody has any right to demand anything.

Didn't help these people much:
 
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MidOH

Rank IV

Off-Road Ranger I

1,298
Mid Ohio
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John
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Clark
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BS.

We left no trace at all. Round lake rocks, and beach sand don't require kids gloves. The rocks are completely unaffected, and the sand moves around on it's own anyways. Just because Cali folks can't go outside without ruining it, doesn't mean that the rest of the world can't harmlessly back right up the lake. The ''leave no trace'' people are nearly always just ignorant ''Gatekeepers''.

Most of our State Parks put their prime campsites right on top of the lakes and rivers.

Especially compared to your Links land scar single track trail. Frack, the boat floats. So good luck tracing that.
 
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Bama_Kiwi

Rank IV
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Enthusiast III

1,393
Christchurch, New Zealand
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Ryan
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Frank
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BS.

We left no trace at all. Round lake rocks, and beach sand don't require kids gloves. The rocks are completely unaffected, and the sand moves around on it's own anyways. Just because Cali folks can't go outside without ruining it, doesn't mean that the rest of the world can't harmlessly back right up the lake. The ''leave no trace'' people are nearly always just ignorant ''Gatekeepers''.

Most of our State Parks put their prime campsites right on top of the lakes and rivers.

Especially compared to your Links land scar single track trail. Frack, the boat floats. So good luck tracing that.
It has nothing to do with how tough rocks are...

"Avoid camping close to water and trails, and select a site which is not easily visible to others. Even in popular areas, the sense of solitude can be enhanced by screening campsites and choosing an out-of-the-way site. Camping 200 feet (70 adult steps) away from the water’s edge is recommended because it allows access routes for wildlife. "

But, cool, keep doing you.
 

Winterpeg

CDN Prairie Ambassador
Staff member
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Influencer II

3,278
Winnipeg, MB
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2861

It has nothing to do with how tough rocks are...

"Avoid camping close to water and trails, and select a site which is not easily visible to others. Even in popular areas, the sense of solitude can be enhanced by screening campsites and choosing an out-of-the-way site. Camping 200 feet (70 adult steps) away from the water’s edge is recommended because it allows access routes for wildlife. "

But, cool, keep doing you.
Keep in mind this is a global site with an extremely diverse geographical area with vastly different rules and etiquette.

I camp on a beach typically... at a lake that takes over 2 hrs to get to by quads typically or by a hardcore'ish 4x4.

I rarely see anyone.... sometimes by quad.... sometimes by boat.... sometimes by float plane.
 

Shakes355

Rank III
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Enthusiast II

509
Bellingham, WA, USA
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Chris
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Adams
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24526

I was raised to speak up when I see something. Doesn't mean I have to be rude or disrespectful about it. I expect others to speak up if I'm out of line as well.

Dont give if you cant take.
Don't do to others what you wouldn't want done to you.

In most cases I dont lecture or judge.

I also dont let "backlash" slow me down. In my experience, weve both got better things to do than get into a spit. I speak my peace and walk away (including online). Be mindful of text though. Written word has a hard go at conveying intent.
 

MidOH

Rank IV

Off-Road Ranger I

1,298
Mid Ohio
First Name
John
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At least check what's allowed and ok, before saying anything. Or say something in an asking manner. "Is it Ok to do that here?''

Donuts and roost on a sand dune is perfectly acceptable in Michigan.

We had a nimby call the park about dirtbikes a while ago. Something like:
"There's bikers tearing up the trails, and camping in flower fields.''
"Ma'am, that's a superfund site.''
"An expensive park?''
"No, well kinda. It was a waste dump and chemical factory. So campers are welcome to tear it up and offroad. It's just a park on a landfill now. It has no environmental impact at all.''
 

pcstockton

Rank 0

Contributor II

98
Portland, OR
First Name
Patrick
Last Name
S
It has nothing to do with how tough rocks are...

"Avoid camping close to water and trails, and select a site which is not easily visible to others. Even in popular areas, the sense of solitude can be enhanced by screening campsites and choosing an out-of-the-way site. Camping 200 feet (70 adult steps) away from the water’s edge is recommended because it allows access routes for wildlife. "

But, cool, keep doing you.
In the Pacific NW we have thousands of State and NF designated camping sites (picnic table, fire ring, site #, etc) right on the water (lake, stream, pond, river, creek). I mean as close as you can get.

The principles you are quoting are for dispersed camping.

Of course, either way, always try to leave it better than you found it.
 

smritte

Rank V
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Off-Road Ranger I

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Ontario California
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.
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Started typing another long winded response rant. Deleted it because of who will read it. Everyone here will have seen pretty much the same thing across the board.
Edited version. Several decades of maintaining 4wd trails. The stupid things I have seen people do then justify what they did. Way too much to list. Bottom line, cant fix stupid, entitled...........people. Some people listen, most don't care.
New record here for shortest response to this type of topic for me.
 

bgenlvtex

Rank V
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Enthusiast III

1,798
Texas and Alaska
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Every place on this planet was perfect and pristine before man took it over, so where do you draw the line? I abhor human hives, there is nothing more disgusting or abusive to the planet than a mega city, nothing. Yet people seem to think that is how it should be.

Build a fire ring and drive right up to in an out of the way place? Not even bothered by it as long as you scatter the rocks when you're done and don't leave any garbage.

Rabid activists regardless their chosen "cause" are some of the most obnoxious individuals to be found, and your opinion of how I am conducting myself is unwelcome.
 

Relic6.3

Rank IV
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Enthusiast III

1,221
North Carolina, USA
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I posted "Tread Lightly" on a local NZ Instagram account that features 4wds. The post was a video of someone in a diesel Nissan Patrol on a beach doing donuts and "rolling coal". The reply from the account owner was, "The fuck that's supposed to mean, mate?"

I immediately unfollowed the account.
I had a similar experience with a Facebook group here in North Carolina. "Owner" of the group posted a video of a fellow he was riding adventure bikes with heading off trail up a stream, turning around to come back to trail and dumping bike in the stream. Funny, funny, ha ha. I posted a comment about the group not following Tread Lightly principal and got a response back of, "Heck no". Needless to say, I am no longer a part of that particular group.
 

grubworm

Rank V
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Member I

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Thibodaux, LA, USA
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grub
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worm
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TREAD LIGHTLY??? really? look at what the astronots did on the moon...they left shit everywhere! lander and moon buggy left abandoned, flags, golf balls, cigarette butts, tire tracks everywhere...i'm pretty sure they left poo up there as well and i sure as hell didn't see buzz aldrin toting a shovel

i'll get onboard when NASA does....:rage:

1604106013484.png
 
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Anak

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,271
Sandy Eggo
TREAD LIGHTLY??? really? look at what the astronots did on the moon...they left shit everywhere! lander and moon buggy left abandoned, flags, golf balls, cigarette butts, tire tracks everywhere...i'm pretty sure they left poo up there as well and i sure as hell didn't see buzz aldrin toting a shovel

i'll get onboard when NASA does....:rage:

View attachment 175337
Meh.

It was all a conspiracy ploy anyways.

:tonguewink:
 

Paula - Canadian Explorer

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OB1

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Okotoks, AB, Canada
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Ponte
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My town just instilled the mandatory use of masks, again - even in public! Great! This should be expanded to all towns in Alberta, and across Canada. Wearing a mask is not a political statement - not in Canada anyway - it’s a requirement. Stores will give you a mask if you want to shop, and ask that you sanitize your hands. Great! I support the little business and want to keep them open. I will politely call out anyone that’s not using a mask. My step-daughter works in the medical field. She’s had to test now 3 times because of idiots!
I want her healthy and employed. If I call someone out and they hate it, or react, I’ll push the issue. Others will join in. So hate me! But my point will be made. The person may not use it or want it, but those that value their health and local business will welcome the use of masks.

As for the trails - including hiking trails - yup, seen those too, even in my hiking Meetup group. I prefer to call them aside and remind them of our rules. Sometimes it’s just a misunderstanding. If I catch them again, on the same hike, they’ll be banned - and believe me, we organizers do share lists of banned hikers, or overlanders if the outing is a road trip. The Waiver that hikers or overlanders sign contains that warning. :tonguewink:
 

Lou Skannon

Rank II

Contributor III

I had the job of looking after some remote campgrounds in British Columbia and rule enforcement was the biggest headache. I hated telling people what to do and there wasn't enough hours in the day to go round and make sure nobody was breaking the rules. There was no back-up; the police were 3 hours away and then they had a 3 hour drive back to base. People paid their fees and felt entitled to do what ever they wanted. I knew I would be paddling up-stream with every confrontation so just went with the flow. Not much job satisfaction and a lot of clearing-up after thoughtless customers but 90% were as good as gold and I made a lot of friends. Karma took care of the rest......I hope.
 

grubworm

Rank V
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Member I

1,858
Thibodaux, LA, USA
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grub
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worm
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well, i personally dont think calling people out is a good idea. say for example someone uses the bathroom right off the trail and doesnt dig a hole and bury it. instead of calling them out and risking confrontation, you should use that opportunity to make it a "teachable moment" for them....

1604236098010.png
 

Paula - Canadian Explorer

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Member
OB1

Navigator II

2,885
Okotoks, AB, Canada
First Name
Paula
Last Name
Ponte
Member #

26773

well, i personally dont think calling people out is a good idea. say for example someone uses the bathroom right off the trail and doesnt dig a hole and bury it. instead of calling them out and risking confrontation, you should use that opportunity to make it a "teachable moment" for them....

View attachment 175462
Agree, 100%. I prefer to speak with the person privately. In my experience, 95% of the time people respond well. Of course there are those that do not, and continue being obnoxious. I do not attempt any additional ‘teaching moment,’ I just add them to the ‘banned list.’ Next time they try to join my outing (hiking or road trip) that’s when they find out they’ve been banned. Apology emails or texts then follow after being banned, and I usually give them a chance to redeem themselves.
I’ve also noticed that the obnoxious behaviour has a lot to do with the audience. If they get cheered on by friends, the behaviour doesn’t change. I have a hiker that started out like that. After being banned, and redeeming themselves, they never repeated the behaviour - but they no longer join my outings with the same group of friends either. Self-awareness I guess.
 
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