Post pictures of your camp kitchen

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idahofj

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Idaho, USA
First Name
jerry
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fattig
Our style of travel is basically expedition style, where we are camping somewhere different every night and typically wild/dispersed camping so we setup off the tailgate of my Cruiser. It's evolved over time.

Some features that really help are having water with a downspout off the swingout for washing and drinking water/filling. Also, the fridge (of course!), warm, bright lighting on the hatch, 5#propane tank, having a quick table to pull out. Trasheroo makes it super easy with all garbage. Most recently, I built some simple drawers for all our food and camp gear cuz I was tired of stacking, lifting, opening, closing,packing and digging thru my containers. The drawers made a huge difference and maximized storage. View attachment 26510 Started off basic.View attachment 26507 View attachment 26506 Swingout made everything quicker and more convenient. (Water, fuel, propane, trash) View attachment 26515 Drawers made of 1/2" Russian birch with teflon slides. Just need to rebuild the fridge slide with the fridge turned handle facing out.
Sweet setup!
 

dsheber

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233
Windsor, CA 95492, USA
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Dave
Last Name
Sheber
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23540

Anyone have an experience with the Blackstone? Lately, in the last few months, all of a sudden, various people in the groups we overland with have been pulling them out at camp. Everyone that I know, loves them. I was afraid of the weight, but then I got to thinking, it would eliminate my Coleman and cast iron cookware.......... On the fence, it is big and bulky. I like stuff that I can stow in my Plano cases.........

Pic for reference.View attachment 183702
Blackstone's are great. Friend has a larger one on his deck. You can griddle almost everything, but pasta:). If it fits in the Plano that is a plus. Just remember what cleanup will be with that size griddle. Discadas (think Tembotusk) tend to be a little easier to clean as you can heat it back up and toss some water in it to boil clean.
Have fun, DZ
 
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Lanlubber

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Off-Road Ranger I

2,357
Mimbres, NM, USA
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Jim
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covey sr
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none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
They are nice ,but it is just a griddle. Your coleman and cast iron cookware are more versatile.
Does anyone out in OB land need anything more than a grille and a small stove for hot water. (No fire pits allowed) I thought everyone was a fast food addict. The only thing I see on youtube are people cooking hamburgers, hot dogs, eggs, bacon, hash browns, steaks, and pan cakes. Others use that funny looking reconstituted over priced satellite dish thingy (scottle I think).. LOL... I'm seriously pulling everyone's leg here.. I know there are some really good cooks out there in the boonies, but they are rare !
 

PCO6

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Newmarket, Ontario
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12534

Which folding tables are those? They look quite sturdy
I got them at Cabela's. They're sturdy and they fold up and go into a bag that is a little smaller than a typical camp chair bag. They go on sale from time to time and I think I paid about $95 CDN each for them (about $70 US). According to the link below they appear to be currently out of stock. They've carried them for a long time so my guess is that they'll be back.

Don't Forget Your Gear (cabelas.ca)
 

Bubba Tim

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Traveler II

808
Davie, Fl
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Tim
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Reyes
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You would be better served with a table with adjustable legs..
 

Road

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Advocate III

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Road
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My latest typical set up when camping. All most-used plates and sauté pans go on the orange tray and under the lid of the chuck box for travel. The rest of the kitchen stuff, including dish strainer and all the stuff on the fender, fits nicely into the black folding bag under the table. So two main pieces to pack or unpack, and I'm set up.

Having almost 8' of galley table (attaches to the trailer on two aluminum bars; folds in half for storage) to work with has made a huge difference in what, and how much, I cook when adventuring.

galley_8645-900.jpg


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FishinCrzy

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Explorer I

1,347
South Carolina, USA
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Rob
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Duncan
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My latest typical set up when camping. All most-used plates and sauté pans go on the orange tray and under the lid of the chuck box for travel. The rest of the kitchen stuff, including dish strainer and all the stuff on the fender, fits nicely into the black folding bag under the table. So two main pieces to pack or unpack, and I'm set up.

Having almost 8' of galley table (attaches to the trailer on two aluminum bars; folds in half for storage) to work with has made a huge difference in what, and how much, I cook when adventuring.

View attachment 189692


.
Road, if it is true that "He who dies with the most toys wins" you are way ahead of most of us! LOL!
 

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Road

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Road, if it is true that "He who dies with the most toys wins" you are way ahead of most of us! LOL!
.
I was in a Nat'l Park Visitor's Center years ago, talking to the ranger about trails and such, and told her how much I liked my new trailer setup and how it lets me stay back country longer.

She said "You guys and your toys..."

I said "I think of them as tools."

She laughed and said "Ohh, I see...tools."

Oh man, there are tons of folks who have way more than I do for fancy rigs, add-ons, all sorts of stuff. Just with their vehicle, even before getting set up for camping! Fancy comms, lots of dash-mount this and that, expensive nav systems, etc. All good if you really need it. Most don't, really.

I've tried to choose items, much of it bought used, I can use for living off-grid as well as extended back country camping adventures. Can't afford a fancy place to retire to on a lake or something, so am staying mobile as possible.

I do like my kitchen stuff, though.
 

FishinCrzy

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South Carolina, USA
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.
I was in a Nat'l Park Visitor's Center years ago, talking to the ranger about trails and such, and told her how much I liked my new trailer setup and how it lets me stay back country longer.

She said "You guys and your toys..."

I said "I think of them as tools."

She laughed and said "Ohh, I see...tools."

Oh man, there are tons of folks who have way more than I do for fancy rigs, add-ons, all sorts of stuff. Just with their vehicle, even before getting set up for camping! Fancy comms, lots of dash-mount this and that, expensive nav systems, etc. All good if you really need it. Most don't, really.

I've tried to choose items, much of it bought used, I can use for living off-grid as well as extended back country camping adventures. Can't afford a fancy place to retire to on a lake or something, so am staying mobile as possible.

I do like my kitchen stuff, though.
You're right of course. I was just thinking about that canoe and bike mostly. I looked up that canoe last night, amazing what they do with those materials. Tools, I inherited a bunch and have a warehouse full now. I really have to find a place to put stuff now before I buy it. But, it gives me a good feeling knowing I can fix most things and be fairly self sufficient. I just put that neat little fire pit grill you showed in the cart until I will be here to get it. 5 lb. propane bottle is on the way. I like cooking and kitchen stuff. My problem is the older I get the less I want to eat the same thing more than once or twice in a month. I have to keep looking for new and tasty things.
 
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Road

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You're right of course. I was just thinking about that canoe and bike mostly. I looked up that canoe last night, amazing what they do with those materials. Tools, I inherited a bunch and have a warehouse full now. I really have to find a place to put stuff now before I buy it. But, it gives me a good feeling knowing I can fix most things and be fairly self sufficient. I just put that neat little fire pit grill you showed in the cart until I will be here to get it. 5 lb. propane bottle is on the way. I like cooking and kitchen stuff. My problem is the older I get the less I want to eat the same thing more than once or twice in a month. I have to keep looking for new and tasty things.
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I understand that; finding new tasty things. I've learned with limited fridge and pantry space one can make a bunch of a foundation food (usually a protein), then use it a number of ways that week for a variety of different tasting meals. Chicken especially. I'm ever so slowly working on a Roaddude Food Cookbook of tried and true recipes possible when back country camping.

steak-mshrms-n-asparaguspartnerstove22-3450.jpg

,
 

TahoePPV

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I understand that; finding new tasty things. I've learned with limited fridge and pantry space one can make a bunch of a foundation food (usually a protein), then use it a number of ways that week for a variety of different tasting meals. Chicken especially. I'm ever so slowly working on a Roaddude Food Cookbook of tried and true recipes possible when back country camping.

View attachment 189889

,
That looks delicious.
 
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Road

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That looks delicious.
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It was, Rex. Was just above freezing in the mountains of east Tennessee.

I found some nice filet mignon on sale in town because it was about to go out of date, grabbed some fresh asparagus and mushrooms, added some sliced onion; sprinkled it all with some Stubb's Beef Rub (sea salt, molasses and coffee; he makes a nice chicken rub, too), seared that steak good one side and flipped it, turned the asparagus and mushroom onion medley, cracked a Shiner Bock and had a nice meal.

My kid, who's worked professionally in kitchens, taught me how to grill beef best. I used to keep checking it, flipping it from side to side, and pressing it down whether patties or steak. Wrong. Sear it to seal in the juices and don't press those juices out. Flip it once; a couple of minutes each side depending on how rare or not you want it. Simple advice but changed the way I cook most all proteins now.
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