Overland Safety: First-Aid Kits

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old_man

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I was an EMT in a previous life. I carry an extensive kit. The one thing I have found very handy to carry is a couple of bottles of water in my kit. I also carry a squirt top. Many injuries I have dealt with in the middle of nowhere entail a messy dirty wound. I like to have a way to flush out the debris before bandaging . I can use it to cool someone down and hydrate them without having to dig through everything else.

I am also diabetic so I carry a bunch of sugar packets from McDonalds. They work well without all the cost and hassle.

NOTE: for those of you who come upon a diabetic that is unresponsive, do not grab their insulin and give them a shot. Most times the problem is actually that they have gotten too much insulin for their exercise and intake level and they are suffering from low blood sugar and giving them insulin without measuring their blood sugar level and knowing what you are doing can easily kill them.
 

old_man

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A couple of other common items I like to keep in the kit are a roll of paper towel for general cleanup and Kotex. They were originally developed as wound dressings.
 

The Traveling Shepherd

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old_man

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Never said to use a tampon. Direct pressure using a Kotex or the equivalent has been used for decades. Not everybody is going to go out and buy a special product when they have something that could work in their bathroom. I carry a bleeding stopper as well, but there are other options.
 

The Traveling Shepherd

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Technically with severe bleeding it’s direct pressure, wound packing, tourniquet, or a surgical procedure. Clotting agents work fantastic if used in conjunction with these techniques but they’re rarely effective on their own.
of course you use them in conjunction with direct pressure, TQ. or other methods
There seems to be a rumor floating around that tampons make great blood stoppers, wound pluggers. That's what I was adressing
 

The Traveling Shepherd

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Never said to use a tampon. Direct pressure using a Kotex or the equivalent has been used for decades. Not everybody is going to go out and buy a special product when they have something that could work in their bathroom. I carry a bleeding stopper as well, but there are other options.
I agree, but I don't have my home bathroom with me when I travel so I have a kit. I'm paranoid like that
 

TnWalrus

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I was an EMT in a previous life. I carry an extensive kit. The one thing I have found very handy to carry is a couple of bottles of water in my kit. I also carry a squirt top. Many injuries I have dealt with in the middle of nowhere entail a messy dirty wound. I like to have a way to flush out the debris before bandaging . I can use it to cool someone down and hydrate them without having to dig through everything else.

I am also diabetic so I carry a bunch of sugar packets from McDonalds. They work well without all the cost and hassle.

NOTE: for those of you who come upon a diabetic that is unresponsive, do not grab their insulin and give them a shot. Most times the problem is actually that they have gotten too much insulin for their exercise and intake level and they are suffering from low blood sugar and giving them insulin without measuring their blood sugar level and knowing what you are doing can easily kill them.
Water bottles are a really good idea, If you get some Providine packets on Amazon you can mix it with some water in a Nalgen bottle and have a really good irrigation solution to clean wounds with. For nasty wounds I like an assortment of Steri Strips and some tincture of Benzoin swabs. I’ve seen kits that have suture kits in them, and unless you know what you are doing, chances are that you will just rip the skin and never get good wound closure. Steri Strips work great, or you can use super glue in a pinch. Just get the wound clean before you close it.
 
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old_man

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Benzoin is a really old school technique, and it works great. But from experience, it hurts like HELL. Works great on popped blisters as well.
 
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TnWalrus

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Benzoin is a really old school technique, and it works great. But from experience, it hurts like HELL. Works great on popped blisters as well.
Don’t get it in the wound and it won’t hurt so much. :yum: Just paint the edges to help the Steri strips bond. Of course its old school. Hell, I’m OLD. I got my EMT in 89, and my Medic in 96.
 

TnWalrus

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In that case, yes I am! Where I work, I’m the old man though. I’ve got a bunch of 20-30 somethings that I supervise.
 

smlobx

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I'll add a couple of comments to this great thread..

First, please get some good training such as WFA. I think most of us can agree that if we are in cell phone range and something serious happens we want to make the call asap and do what we can to stabilize the patient until qualified medical help arrives...

The problem occurs when you're out of cell range and at least an hour from being able to summon help. This is where outdoor medical training will come into play. Please get trained and keep your training up to date.

For myself I actually have three different kits. The first one is velcroed to the back of my headrest in my truck and has the basics to address potential car accidents.
The second is more extensive and I carry it on hikes in the back country where I'm usually out of cell service.
The third one is the extensive one that I keep in my camper and has just about everything I could possibly need to address situations I'm qualified to address.

Two things that I keep with me in the back country that I haven't seen mentioned is a headlamp. Remember accidents don't always happen during the day and using a headlamp frees your hands to address the situation. The second is a way to reach out for help if TSHTF. For me I carry a Garmin InReach that uses satellites to allow me to call for help almost anywhere...
 

Paladin2020

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I keep a First Aid kit on both sides behind the head rest of the back seat and a Trauma kit under the back seat driver side, plus two fire extinguishers.
 

AAONMS

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Many of us have reached the age or have had an illness where we take medications. On occasion, I am prescribed something that comes in a larger than standard container. My favorites are the containers that are a bit over 5” tall. It will fit enough items to cover basic needs with the bonus of being waterproof. They take up little room in a daypack or in my Jeep.
Among what I have in the container are:
Anti-diarrhea med
Alcohol swabs
Aspirin and ibuprofen
Pair of nitrile gloves
Celox (Blood clotting agent)
Band-Aids
Polysporin
Q-tips
Moleskin
Coflex
Gauze pads
Tweezers
Tick removal tool

Above meets my level of basic first aid training.
A personal example of training vs. gear: Fifteen years ago, while on a trailride, I crushed and nearly amputated a finger. We had an orthopedic surgeon in the club with us. He treated me with a sandwich bag, gauze, ice, and a cooler to transport me to the hospital. No Band-Aids, no aspirin or fancy gear. He wrapped the finger in gauze, put my hand in the plastic bag and then immersed the hand in the cooler.