Overland Safety: First-Aid Kits

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HappyOurOverlanding

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Great thread all. This is one item I am always looking to enhance. I have a small basic kit I carry. However, some of the items I read in this thread are on my list--i.e. splints, wound cleaning supplies that aren't the tiny 'wipies' along with others mentioned. Thanks for the info.
 
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Subzilla

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Great thread all. This is one item I am always looking to enhance. I have a small basic kit I carry. However, some of the items I read in this thread are on my list--i.e. splints, wound cleaning supplies that aren't the tiny 'wipies' along with others mentioned. Thanks for the info.
If you go looking for Sam splints very effective and take up very little room!

Sent from my P00I using OB Talk mobile app
 

Shallow Water Steve

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I'll just share, this is the kit I just put together for my cross country trip and the kit that will stay with the truck for many adventures to come. Grabbed a first aid pouch from Amazon since I already had most of the supplies on hand from work.




Top is Trauma: HyVent Chest Seals, Israeli Bandage, Combat Gauze, Celox Granuals, Saljets, CAT Tourniquet, Gloves, Cold Pack, Wound Closure Strips, Petroleum Gauze, Gauze Pads, CPR Mask, Shears.

Middle: I'm a huge fan of the Adventure Medical .7 kit. I grab this out of here for hikes or other activities I don't want to take this whole kit on. I've expanded some of the medication in this kit, but other than that its got just about everything you could need up to major trauma. This is where the medications, moleskin, band aids, creams, and ace bandage live, among other things they've managed to stuff in there. Behind it is their dental medic kit as well. The rest is another trauma bandage, betadine, oral and nasal airways, oral IV, bug spray, duct tape, and a triangular bandage.



The bottom pouch is a hodge podge of hygeine and other items that weren't in the Adventure Medical Kit or didn't fit cleanly elsewhere. Single use tooth brushes, hand wipes, floss, hydrocortisone packets, burn cream packets, sunscreen packets, ammonia inhalants, chapstick. Last but certainly not least, instant coffee packets!




Like many others have said, first aid kit is only as good as your training. This kit has everything I feel comfortable using, right up to my level of training. While I'd love to have sutures and other goodies, I'd do more harm than good even in the most exigent circumstance.
 

Jim SoG

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TreXTerra

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I have two CATS tourniquets in my overland rig, one in the large first aid kit and another in a PFAK on the back of the driver's seat. I hope I never need them (and I'm probably over-equipped), but with how few people I see on the trail with their own kits, I feel better having more than I should need.

Plus, I've rolled up on major highway crashes sometimes as much as 20-30 minutes before EMS arrive. With multiple casualties, I've completely exhausted the supplies in my older, smaller kit with a single incident.
 

xLandslidex

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I just want to add one small thing that i have noticed that no one has mentioned, and that is if you have pets with you on our trips majority of all first aid kits you can use on your pet. you can get premade kits designed for pets but the carry the same item as a normal kit with a couple exception. The number one thing is to have your vets number in case of an emergency.
 

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Looking forward to getting the most up-to-date recommendations for civilian emergency care. It’s free, open to the public, and certainly a much better source of evidence-based information. Let face it, the parroting of outdated/disproven/archaic information often found on forums is so 30 seconds ago!!!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/c-tecc-mid-year-meeting-tickets-51172691899
 

T.Shack

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Wow another great topic. i keep a small personal on in my bug out pack. I was able to get an expired full trauma kit at work they replace them every 3 to 5 years. I need to change out a few items to get thing back up to date.
 

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It drives me nuts hearing people tell me they will just use a belt or their Israeli bandage.
I hear ya. While knowing how to improvise a tourniquet or any other immediate first aid need from available items is important for those times you might not have a trauma kit handy, having the right tool for the job makes things far safer, reliable and more efficient. Knowing how to adapt, improvise and overcome is not an excuse for not being properly equipped.
 
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T.Shack

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I hear ya. While knowing how to improvise a tourniquet or any other immediate first aid need from available items is important for those times you might not have a trauma kit handy, having the right tool for the job makes things far safer, reliable and more efficient. Knowing how to adapt, improvise and overcome is not an excuse for not being properly equipped.
I really need to see what is out of date. It may be nothing. I really do understand the improvising when need to part. That
Is partly why I always have a belt on. I have used them to help splint ankles & make slings. Good old BSA upbringing teaches alot. Lol. Plus an RN mother & a Fire Captain dad! I did just add a second small emergency kit from Wally world. It has a small first aid kit an molar em blanket some water ect. For just less then 20 bucks. I figured it to be worth it
 
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Firemom

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Here is a great read on civilian use of tourniquets:(if you don’t have one, you need to get one)

http://trauma-news.com/2018/04/civilian-tourniquet-use-associated-with-six-fold-reduction-in-mortality/
Great article.
The “tourniquets are good” re-education process in the civilian and EMS world has been slow and rocky. I’m an old medic with many many years of “touniquet use = limb death and patient toxicity” training, but medicine is always evolving and advancing. New studies and an understanding of past vs present trama treatment situations and resorces make for new guidelines, and we as EMS and civilian providers need to evolve and advance with it.
It can be hard to let go of old “truths” but education on the current info allows an understanding of the why’s and what for’s. I have found that when starting any section of training that has been subject to major shifts in treatment recommendations, it helps people’s understanding by starting out with a brief past vs present reasoning, and “this is why things have changed” explanation. Overall this makes everyone far more receptive to the updated information.
The link you provided is a good example of the research supportive of tourniquet use.

A search on tourniquet studies will provide a ton of data. This study however is a bit different. https://www.israelifirstaid.com/blog/study-suggests-best-tourniquets-to-use-on-children-are-swatt-and-rats/
It studies tourniquet use in children and can be helpful for the Overlander traveling with human or animal kids. I personally carry the SWATT and CAT tourniquets. The CAT is very well known and effective. The SWATT is very effective, takes up very little space and can also be used as a pressure dressing, sling or immobilization adjunct. I like first aid equipment that is space and weight saving and can serve multiple functions.
 

Nickzero

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Make your kit easily to find and also easily accessible in your rig. Asure the kit wont get crushed by falling or moving objects in your rig. Always pack the correct medical supplies instead of the entire doctors office. The last thing you want is to get overwhelmed with the amount of supplies you have under severe stress. --- I agree with always having a TQ on your person when venturing away from your rig. Saving a life happens before you even leave the house for your trip. Come prepared with the necessities for your trip. Medical cannot be overlooked! (Check out SkinnyMedics website, he has some quality med kits pre-packed for those looking for one at a great price.) - NICKZERO
 

Rollin Dirty Overland

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I'm very happy to see awareness of trauma control and M.A.R.C.H. make the mainstream and everyone on board with proper emergency med kits. We have to know how to use these things! Having a tourniquet is not as good as you think if you don't know how or when to apply it. Several packs of gauze are no help if you don't know how to pack a wound to stop a massive bleed.

What I want to see next in this thread is everyone chime in with their training experience. An IFAK class? National Stop The Bleed? An invasive interventions class? Army CLS? What you got?

Me? Combat Lifesaver from U.S. Army. IFAK Lifesaver (X2), Stop The Bleed, Invasive Trauma Interventions, and K9 First Aide from Independence Training in Phoenix.
 
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What I want to see next in this thread is everyone chime in with their training experience. An IFAK class? National Stop The Bleed? An invasive interventions class? Army CLS? What you got?
On that note, the following guideline is worth the read for all of you traveling outside the reach of the 911 system. Yes, the first page has an "Active Shooter" tone to it but this guideline was established for "untrained" civilians (aka, First Care Providers) and can easily be applied to a remote setting. Please don't hesitate to initiate the treatment plans on pages 2-4 (INDIRECT THREAT CARE) whether you personally have called 911 or sent someone to do so. Your actions will most-likely make the difference in the Patient's outcome which is why this guideline is the foundation for all of the kits listed on our website:

Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) Guidelines For First Care Providers

Here's a downloadable file for you to keep in your kit:
 

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Nickzero

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Please don't settle for a cheap First Aid Kit form amazon or Walmart. First plan out what is necessary for your trip. Next go out and explore the web for a pre-assembled kit since that is gennerally the least expensive way to purchase your first aid supplies. I suggest using kits from Skinny Medic or any reputable online retailer like North American Rescue when building your kits.

After years of wasting money on trying to build my own kits I settled for a complete kit from Skinny Medic along with a few extras from NAR. Also check out the RATS TQ and CAT TQ for quick blood stopper applications. Here is a picture of what I have setup on the back of my passenger seat for quick access. Links below, please check them out for the best stuff. Field proven stuff for any line of work requiring medical attn.

North American Rescue: https://www.narescue.com/
Skinny Medic: https://shop.skinnymedic.com/
Mollee Panel: https://greyman-tactical.com/
RATS TQ: https://ratsmedical.com/

Screen Shot 2019-01-20 at 3.11.14 AM.png
 

Nickzero

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Just a reminder for people who carry fluids in the wintertime. Heat casualties and dehydration can hit people even in the dead of winter. Always be on the look out for it. That being said, if you carry fluids make sure you're not leaving them in your car. You dont want your NS to freeze!
Extremely important! Nice post.

Once I found myself sleeping in freezing temps in my rig. I was warm in my bag however once I woke up I was dry mouth and my water had frozen overnight. This was a nightmare since I needed water to cook with and to drink in the morning. I ended up using the heat from my engine to melt the ice that morning. Will always remember to keep my liquids in the bag with me or bundled up. Keeping hydrated keeps us sane and thinking clearly.