Over landing with a dog

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raptor510

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Ok, in short I’m wanting to begin taking my doggo over landing with me. I’ve got everything covered except his sleeping arrangement. I have a Tacoma with the long bed which I sleep in, and a storage drawer with a fridge & slide mounted to it. This leaves zero room for anyone but me to sleep inside. So my question is: what are the options for my doggo? I can easily bring his cot and blanket from home, and I have an awning on the rear of the truck that would keep him out of the rain, so I’m thinking just set his cot and blanket up outside the tailgate under the awning, then leash him to the swing out tire carrier so he doesn’t wander off, but with enough line so he can potty when he needs to. Thoughts?
 

TahoePPV

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How big is your dog? Could he sleep on top of the fridge?
 

TahoePPV

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I camp with my Bernese Mountain dog. She’s 95 pounds of sleeping wherever I am. Either in a ground tent or in my teardrop.
 
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raptor510

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He’s a chocolate lab weighing in at about 90lbs. There’s less than 2” between the fridge and the top of the camper.
He won’t potty at night, sleeps all night and holds it till I let him out in the morning.
He’s only 10 months old so sometimes he can’t help himself and will chew on things so sleeping in the cab alone isn’t an option for the time being. Im thinking for the time being I’m going to bring his crate with a few blankets and put it under a free standing awning I have.
 
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TahoePPV

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He’s definitely NOT done teething, so the cab would be a future choice. My last lab loved drywall. I came home once to find a hole in the middle of a wall. How she got her teeth into, I don’t know.
 
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Outdoordog

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He’s definitely NOT done teething, so the cab would be a future choice. My last lab loved drywall. I came home once to find a whole in the middle of a wall. How she got her teeth into, I don’t know.
Mine ripped up carpet, twice.

My 2 dogs sleep with me in a ground tent. They're 45 and 65 lbs.
 

TahoePPV

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Mine ripped up carpet, twice.

My 2 dogs sleep with me in a ground tent. They're 45 and 65 lbs.
i Removed the rear seat in my Tahoe. My doggie has a bed in there to lay or sit on. At night the same bed goes into the tent or teardrop. Until I did that she never really got comfortable. Now she knows it’s her spot.
 

MarioT'sCJResto

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Ok, in short I’m wanting to begin taking my doggo over landing with me. I’ve got everything covered except his sleeping arrangement. I have a Tacoma with the long bed which I sleep in, and a storage drawer with a fridge & slide mounted to it. This leaves zero room for anyone but me to sleep inside. So my question is: what are the options for my doggo? I can easily bring his cot and blanket from home, and I have an awning on the rear of the truck that would keep him out of the rain, so I’m thinking just set his cot and blanket up outside the tailgate under the awning, then leash him to the swing out tire carrier so he doesn’t wander off, but with enough line so he can potty when he needs to. Thoughts?

Well this a subject that I have discussed over the last few months on this venue and I alway get great feedback. If you scroll around you will find a secondary thread that you can also 'tap' into for some tips.
I like to always start with the words; Speaking for myself here as everyone has their own level of experience when it comes to traveling with their four paw companions.

Over the last year I have planned my rig and gear around my 3 overgrown rug rats, tossed away the idea of an RTT and I'm currently planning on taking my 3 winter camping up in Northern NY.

The first questions that come to mind here are:

1. What locations do you have mapped out (If you don't mind me asking)?
2. Does your puppy get excited and wrap itself around a tree if you tie the puppy outdoors to a tree with the extended cable?

* If you're headed up in the north country; were you have Big Game I would take precaution when it comes to leaving him tied up. Not only is he a puppy that might have the urge to run and sniff, but I would be concerned about what might come in camp at night.

Shopping around I found a very inexpensive 4 walled canopy from Cabela's that might fit your needs. The Caravan V Series would make a great shelter on the ground, and I would add a crate for added protection / peace of mind. If you find yourself in a colder climate you can always pic up a Mr Heater Buddy for the pup.

For myself I decided to stay on the ground with a White Duck Canvas Bell Tent and Stove, and I just picked up a second Bell Tent for my two 20 month black mouth curs. I plan on using this setup with two crates and Mr Heater Buddy, and my oldest will stay with me in the main tent.

(I know this is long winded so I'll wrap it up with)

  • Check out GPS collars - I use Tractive GPS collars; they have an affordable premium app tracking package for $100 a year, a strobe light which works wonders at night and the app is very user friendly with a lot of cool features.
  • Pet ID Chip
  • Dog crates as mentioned - You will also find great options at the sporting goods stores with cold weather insulation.
  • Reflective Collars, Vests
  • Most important - if the rule is two gallons per day (Water Storage) per person, then I would calculate 1 gallon per pup per day, and a Pet First Aid Kit

Using a cable to tie the puppy out can also lead to issues if you're pup runs around, and around the rear tires and can lead to injury or worse. (My pups will run around in circles and get trapped)

I will post my pics of my trips as we head out this winter, and if you ever need anything please don't hesitate to send me a direct message

By the way this reply is way too complicated; before watching all these overloading video's on Youtube I just tossed the pups in the SUV and hit the road. Winged it!

1st Pic - GPS Tracker for Wanda - 24 hour history (Alert options available by setting up a virtual fence)
 

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USStrongman

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My $0.02 is simple. If your dog is your family, you find a way for him/her to sleep where you do, not outside. Maybe he/she isnt old enough yet? Only you would know. If its a dog that is used to being outside in different weather types and outside often, then thats a different story.

You can see in my avatar my 175lb Great Dane / Bull Mastiff. He is huge, but the best dog Ive ever had. He and I sleep together in our ground tent or in really cold or rain/snow, the back of the Jeep.
 

ThundahBeagle

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One thing I know is, NO way would I leave my pet outside at night. I dont even leave him tied out beyond dusk. Coyotes, wolves, foxes and whatnot would absolutely have thier way with a domestic dog, especially one that is literally hamstrung being tethered. It's true that Beagles often run off and survive a night or a week out in the elements, returning with a frayed metal cable trailing behind them as they poop out a rabbit skull, but they return thinner and harrowed (but oddly kind of happy in thier view), but often injured. And I've seen what a coyote will do to a Beagle when they compete for the same prey. Personally, I would not want outside, uncovered, un-kenneled, unfenced sleeping to be the norm for my dog unless I was sleeping on the ground outside with him.

When we camp, my dog loves to get in the sleeping bag with me and shuffle down to my feet. Keep in mind, Scout the ThundahBeagle is less than 30 pounds, of course. I love the Tocomas but with a 90 pound dog, it might be good to get a bigger truck? Just one man's opinion.

If we have to sleep in the cab, my truck is the "double" cab -aka extended cab. The whole rear bench seat is his. He has a Kurgo Tru-Fit Harness and tether to the seatbelts. I have a bench seat cover so he doesnt ruin the upholstery. He can ride or sleep back there quite comfortably, even is I recline my seat all the way
 
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rumbledawg

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My $0.02 is simple. If your dog is your family, you find a way for him/her to sleep where you do, not outside. Maybe he/she isnt old enough yet? Only you would know. If its a dog that is used to being outside in different weather types and outside often, then thats a different story.

You can see in my avatar my 175lb Great Dane / Bull Mastiff. He is huge, but the best dog Ive ever had. He and I sleep together in our ground tent or in really cold or rain/snow, the back of the Jeep.
beautiful dog, love mastiffs
my DixieLou passed 4 yrs ago, she was right around 240lbs when she died
IMG_0530.JPG
 

rumbledawg

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ya, it bites their little lives are so short...i prefer my dawgs company waaay more than any human....(except maybe the wifey..)
D-lou is digging for bones in that big kennel in the sky
DVUg4jiVMAA0u4o_opt.jpg
 
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ThundahBeagle

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Havent personally had to go through the loss of a pet in a long time. I hope I dont have to for a long time yet.
 

MidOH

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A Choco lab has nothing to worry about from 'yotes. Ours would just sleep at the feet of the horses when we went camping.

I'd switch to a large ground tent for both of you for now. Later he'll likely just prefer sleeping under the truck. Leashing to the tire carrier might not be pretty, if you're the kind of person that's forgotten anything..........ever.
 

ThundahBeagle

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A Choco lab has nothing to worry about from 'yotes. Ours would just sleep at the feet of the horses when we went camping.

I'd switch to a large ground tent for both of you for now. Later he'll likely just prefer sleeping under the truck. Leashing to the tire carrier might not be pretty, if you're the kind of person that's forgotten anything..........ever.
MidOH,

What makes you say a choc lab has nothing to worry about from coyotes? A domestic Pit Bull (American Staffordshire) wouldn't stand much chance. I would respectfully disagree. It's not really a matter of size. Coyotes are known to take down deer. Those wild animals are driven for food to survive. A domesticated dog of any type is not.

Look at wolf and coyote tracks in the snow sometime. The move straight along to where they are going. They do not run crisscross along any given path or meander like our pups picking up on new and exciting scents. No. They live out there and move straight along because they already know what's out there and make a bee line where they are going. There isnt a domesticated dog that stands much chance (barring devine intervention or a .357) if a wolf or a pack of 'yotes are hungry.
 

Ursa Major

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To make the case that coyotes are intensive in the wild is an understory. I'm studying to be an ecologist, and in my studies we learned that coyotes are as adaptable to their surroundings as humans are. One word fact making them very different from wolves is that, with wolves, you can take out just the alpha and the pack disperses, not coyotes. When you take out the alpha of coyotes, it triggers a race to breed a ton, setting up a "new" alpha. So that said, and the fact they are more omnivores than strict carnivores, they can be even more deadly than once thought. Be careful is all I'm saying.