On board air or portable tank

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EricGagne

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How many batteries to fill a 37" tire?

Good luck with that. While my portable electric stuff has become more powerful, stamina, it has not. And those batteries loose half their charge when the temps drop. My electric impact eats a battery in just a few uses in the winter.
I watched a review on YouTube, a guy reinflated four 38" tires from 5 to 38 psi with one 4.0 amp/hour battery....not bad at all imo.
 

dwb133

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Have a new 2019 Tacoma and want/need a air source for re-inflating tires. Options are the ARB vehicle mounted twin compressor which would be mounted under the hood or the Power Tank portable CO2 tank which would be mounted in the bed or on the rack. Just curious what you all are using and why. Thanks!!!
I had an onboard for 15 years on my other van. Worked fine but times I needed to take my air farther than my hoses could reach to do something. So on my new rig I bit the bullet and got the ARB dual portable, way over priced but after using it four or five times it is the best. I can take it out and have a buddy use it, or use it in the garage, just an all around really nice unit.
 
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Shane Waters

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Really like this battery operated idea as I to have lots of dewalt batteries. Going to look into for sure.
 

Kwikvette

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I haven't seen Viair compressors mentioned at all; quite a bit less than an ARB and you don't have to carry them with you if you don't want.

Only downfall is having to connect them directly to your battery; that or you can make a plug that'll connect to the front/rear of your vehicle the same way you'd connect a winch mounted on a hitch plate.

A friend of mine that ran an ARB onboard compressor has already gone through 2 of them in the last two or three years. They just don't seem to last for him, but at least customer support has been great.

Personally, I use a 5lb Powertank and I love that I can fill my 32's from 20 psi to 40 psi within seconds. A 5lb tank can last me almost the whole year, but that's because I don't have to air down as much otherwise I would've opted for a 10lb tank.

If plans change, I'll just buy another tank. Removing the regulator is pretty easy anyway.

20190725_093438.jpg

(Been too lazy to drill and install the bracket into my bed)
 
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Ive got the little Viair 88p and am really impressed for $65. It very quickly gets my 31" tires up from 15-30 psi. I also really like that the gauge is built into the compressor itself, because you need to switch off the compressor to get an accurate pressure reading anyway. It comes with a little carry pouch and is easy to set up and put away. I considered going with a mounted setup, but sometimes you just dont need to spend so much money.
 
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Caliber1

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I totally agree, the more CFM the better. Nothing quite finishes off a trail like spending an hour inflating my 35's to 60psi in the heat. Its just like everything else you buy for your rig, Go big or go home!
 

dwb133

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I use the ARB dual portable system. It’s mounted in the rear of my Sparinter and works flawlessly. The beauty of being portable is that if someone needs air and are out of reach of the hose I just carry it over to them. Pricey as hell but so far very worth it.
 

Dustinfromohio

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I’ve got the viair 400p. Only used it a few times so far but I love it. Very fast, well built, comes with a nice carrying bag. It does get very hot during use so I ended up letting it cool off for a few minutes before zipping everything back up, not sure if that’s completely necessary though
 

Specter

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I use an ARB portable as well. My wife is a physician so calling into work isn’t an option. I like that I can deflate her tires if there’s snow and toss the unit in her Subaru for her to fill up if the snow is plowed after her shift. We also own a small tractor, and I can inflate the tires on it whenever needed, no matter where it is located at the time. Finally, we are considering an overlanding trailer, and I wanted something that is mobile for filling up tires further than my rear wheels. Expensive, but priceless.
 

Contributor III

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I picked up a Viair 400p automatic for overlanding and after this last trip was not impressed with the fill times. I have a 10lb co2 when Im in my jeep but this trip was with my truck (35s), wife’s GC (33s) and trailer (33s) and airing up was brutal. I need to find a better quicker solution for both the truck and GC.
 
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Pathfinder I

How many batteries to fill a 37" tire?

Good luck with that. While my portable electric stuff has become more powerful, stamina, it has not. And those batteries loose half their charge when the temps drop. My electric impact eats a battery in just a few uses in the winter.
I use a 24 volt li-po battery powered compressor. I can air up my 4X33's about 4 times before it starts to slow down. I have a impact and drill that use the same batts so I always have 3 or 4 charged up, I have a sine wave inverter that runs the charger if needed. Batteries last 8-10 months in storage before needing to be topped off. They have a 40 volt model out now, didn't have that 2 years ago.
 

Charles M

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I have a 10# tank and love being able to fill four 35 tires in a few minutes. I can fill these tires 3 or 4 times with a full tank. If needed I can swap a tire with my impact wrench or run other air tools too. I like having plenty of air available for other things like blowing up a mattress or blowing the dirt or dust away there is plenty of dust in Nevada... lol

The cost? You can get a 10# tank for less than a $150... A fill up for around 20 bucks. So with the money I save over the cost of a $600 compressor I can do 22 fill ups or 352 tires...

You know what they say "One is none and two is a spare.."

I still carry my twin cylinder compressor for a spare. I got a tank because I was filling tires with my compressor it exceeded the duty cycle and shut down for about an hour after filling 3 tires so, I had to sit in the desert sun waiting for it to cool down... Plus it had taken twenty minutes to fill three tires.

So for me having both is the best of both worlds. Or I guess you could carry two compressors or a bicycle pump for a spare....

Either way they both fill tires so, it is up to you to decide what is bast for you.
 

Lindenwood

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I can fill these tires 3 or 4 times with a full tank.

The cost? You can get a 10# tank for less than a $150... A fill up for around 20 bucks. So with the money I save over the cost of a $600 compressor I can do 22 fill ups or 352 tires...
I like numbers, so this just caught my attention :) .

Two questions:
1) Is it 3 or 4 times? That is a 33% difference :) .
2) Do you really fill your tires up 3 times and take the near-empty tank out?

I only ask because I would be surprised if most folks go longer than two trips (1x re-inflation each, with maybe some dust-blowing and such) before refilling.

So, that $600 compared to a $150 tank* is really about 180 tires, or 45 wheeling trips, before you break even and the ARB wins the cost debate.

Three final considerations, then:
1) Isn't the Powertank like $300+? Can your average bro reliably get a functional 10lb tank setup for $150? If so, it is probably fair to also consider the occasional ARB Twins on sale for $450-500. (Also, of note, my Puma 12v is only ~90 secs slower for all 4 tires than an ARB Twin, but only costs about $250-275--the Smitty 5+ CFM compressor is in a similar arena for even cheaper).

2) Going back to the relatively extreme $600 to $150 comparison, we basically come down to folks evaluating how long they are willing to wait to make up the difference. If you wheel every weekend, and especially if you inflate other rigs' tires, even the ARB is going to pay for itself pretty quickly. If you wheel once a month by yourself (and never inflate pool toys or use air tools, it would indeed take years to make up that difference.

3) Finally, it is worth noting the convenience of having CO2 filled. I use $50/hr as my personal labor cost, and 20 minutes of my time running to the paintball or SCUBA shop nearly doubles the time-cost of a CO2 fillup. So, using the above example, I would be looking at ~25 trips--less, if I air others' tires-- before I broke even.

Just some thoughts :) .
 
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Charles M

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"Lindenwood, post: 376278,
I like numbers, so this just caught my attention :) .

Two questions:
1) Is it 3 or 4 times? That is a 33% difference :) . It depends on how low I go when I air down and also for comparison it would depend on the tire size and pressure you are going back to.
2) Do you really fill your tires up 3 times and take the near-empty tank out? I do 3 times because I do not want to be inconvenienced with running out of air in the middle of nowhere.

I only ask because I would be surprised if most folks go longer than two trips (1x re-inflation each, with maybe some dust-blowing and such) before refilling. I did 2 trips once with two days of blowing off a lot of dust each night to cook and also other around the shop projects and it still had a little left in the tank. So, 3 trips of just airing up is easy to do.

So, that $600 compared to a $150 tank* is really about 180 tires, or 45 wheeling trips, before you break even and the ARB wins the cost debate. At my rate it will take a few years to get to 45 trips.

Three final considerations, then:
1) Isn't the Powertank like $300+? Don't waste money on a power tank. Can your average bro reliably get a functional 10lb tank setup for $150?
Getting a tank for $150 is easy, just go tot a gas supplier and buy a tank , get a regulator and hose. I paid $150 and a guy In our Reno OB club picked one up even cheaper.
If so, it is probably fair to also consider the occasional ARB Twins on sale for $450-500. (Also, of note, my Puma 12v is only ~90 secs slower for all 4 tires than an ARB Twin, but only costs about $250-275--the Smitty 5+ CFM compressor is in a similar arena for even cheaper).

2) Going back to the relatively extreme $600 to $150 comparison, we basically come down to folks evaluating how long they are willing to wait to make up the difference. If you wheel every weekend, and especially if you inflate other rigs' tires, even the ARB is going to pay for itself pretty quickly. If you wheel once a month by yourself (and never inflate pool toys or use air tools, it would indeed take years to make up that difference.

3) Finally, it is worth noting the convenience of having CO2 filled. I use $50/hr as my personal labor cost, and 20 minutes of my time running to the paintball or SCUBA shop nearly doubles the time-cost of a CO2 fillup. So, using the above example, I would be looking at ~25 trips--less, if I air others' tires-- before I broke even. If you use $50.00 as your personal time cost then you need to add that to air up time to right? For me a fill up takes maybe 15 minutes of my time I drop it off and pick it up and my gas supplier is 100 yards from where I work. I am adding a few more hoses and fittings to my set up and I think I will be able to air up 4 tires in less than 5 minutes time.


Just some thoughts :) .
 

Charles M

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Here is a follow up on the cost of a CO@ system.

10 poubd Tank on Amazon $75.00

Adjustable Regulator $39.95

Air hose Harbor freight $ 5.99

Air chuck Harbor Frt. $ 3.99

Fill up at local gas place $ 19.0

Total cost ready to go is $ 143.93

I am sure if you shop for prices or you already have a hose and chuck your initial cost will be much less. In my case I went with more high end stuff for about the same price because I get a professional discount or should I say a friendly neighbor deal.
If you want to go cheaper and or lighter you can get a 5 pound tank around $35 and fill it for $10.00 and it wont take up as much room inside or outside.


I am putting together a 4 port manifold with quick disconnect at each wheel well so, I can air up or down all four tires from one place. Air up, with a preset regulatgor flip the valve, go help or talk with the others for a few minutes then disconnect and go.
 

64Trvlr

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I've had a 80cuft nitrogen bottle with a Victor high pressure regulator (200 PSI) in my Willys since I started building it in the early 90's. The small quality compressors were very expensive then and I used what I had and it's works great for almost 30 years now. I like nitrogen over CO2 because it doesn't freeze up when you use air tools in cold weather and never changes volume with temperature.

Sorry for the poor photo, I'm redoing the interior of the Willys and stuff is piled everywhere.

P5270415.JPG

I have a Viair compressor with a 7 1/2 gal storage tank in my E-350 van and it works fine for what I need in the van.
 

Brewbud

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I have several CO2, Nitrogen and SCUBA tanks in my garage, but I don't want the extra weight or the hazard of high psi compressed gas in the interior of my rigs. I know many people love them but they are not for me. I am looking at getting a portable ARB twin right now. I have been using a couple of MV50s in my Jeep and truck for many years now but I have had to repair them many times. This weekend one let me down. My buddy's Vivair let him down and other Jeep's Vivair compressor had too light of a duty rating to be of much help. I am taking it as a sign that I need to invest. Actually, to be honest, it is my excuse to my wife to invest. :laughing: A lot of gift cards for Amazon help too.
 

Downs

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I daily carry air source is a Viair 88P. Works great for my samller stock sized tires. When I go out on trips I'll sometimes throw my 5lb CO2 tank in the back that I refill from my 20lb CO2 tank I keep in the garage for air around the property away from my compressor. On the trail the little 5lb bottle will refil my tires at least 4 times, and do it as fast as my at home compressor. I've never ran the 20lb tank out on the trail and for almost a year it was my shop compressor since my old compressor died. Regularly ran my impact gun and air ratchet off of it.

For what it's worth unless you just gotta have that Powertank brand name on your vehicle screw it and build your own setup. You can find used CO2 cylinders of various sizes for well under 100 dollars, I got my 5 lb bottle for 40 bucks and my 20lb bottle for 60. Just make sure they have a valid Hydrotest date or you'll have to fork over 30-50 more dollars to have it hydrotested. You can get high flow regulators off of Ebay for 70ish dollars.

Then instead of trying to find a place to refill the fancy powertank cylinder on the spot, you just go to a welding supply or gas supply and exchange the tank straight out. Take the hundreds of dollars you saved and put it in your gas tank.

The obvious advantage of the electric pumps is they don't run out like a CO2 tank. That's why that electric pump is always in my Jeep.
 
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