Winch options

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WJ - Firefly

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I dont like the lack of protection underneath the radiator support and how high the wench sits on the Hanson bumper.
I plan to fab a skid plate/grate after I see how to anchor it to the bumper. I don't mind the height of the winch as it keeps the approach angle higher. Thanks for the input!
 

Lipek

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How about if you just make a receiver in the front that way you can mount the winch on the cradle and connect to the front or rear when needed.
 

Overland-Indiana

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How about if you just make a receiver in the front that way you can mount the winch on the cradle and connect to the front or rear when needed.

I personally don't like that setup.... Winches are heavy and I don't wanna store or have to muscle it when on the trail. I'd rather have a built in winch that all I have to do is anchor and winch.

I have seen some nice setups like that, it just isn't my cup of tea.
 
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Overland-Indiana

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You'd instal the winch before leaving for the trip...
I'm not a fan of that set up either just giving another option .

The hidden winch mount is only about $275 so by the time I got some sort of receiver and mounted a winch to the a receiver mount I'm sure it would cost just as much. I think the hidden mount is nice, it keeps a nice stock appearance and a clean look.
 

Lipek

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The hidden winch mount is only about $275 so by the time I got some sort of receiver and mounted a winch to the a receiver mount I'm sure it would cost just as much. I think the hidden mount is nice, it keeps a nice stock appearance and a clean look.
I agree especially if you're not concern with approach angles and don't have a need for a full metal bumper.
 

Overland-Indiana

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I agree especially if you're not concern with approach angles and don't have a need for a full metal bumper.
I really don't need a steel bumper... If approach angle becomes a problem many WJ owners have trimmed their bumpers, I have not done it yet since I have yet to need it. Most the trails I run are basically un-maintaned dirt roads.
 
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TreXTerra

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I was just listening to a podcast about winches, apparently, most winch companies (including Warn) include a "water clause" in the warranty. Essentially, if you do any kind of water crossing you void your warranty. Also, apparently Warn doesn't even attempt to waterproof their casings, they are left open so water and condensation can drain out - but that also means mud and grit can get washed in.

Some brands that don't have a water exclusion clause:
  • Runva (Chinese company, couldn't find their warranty info online)
  • T-Max (5 year mechanical, 2 year electrical warranty)
  • Ironman (3 year warranty)
  • Roadrunner (5 year)
I will be designing my MkII bumper that will have a winch mount. I'd like to keep the package as small as possible to keep as much air going into the radiator and to keep a good approach angle. Based on what I've learned about Warn and most the larger makes, I think I will actually avoid them, the cost is part of it, but if I'm going to spend that kind of money on a piece of gear, I want to know that the warranty will be there if it fails.

I'd love some feedback from the community on this. I know that Warn has been the gold standard for years, but I have found that going with the company that has something to prove is often the best product and at a better price than the established brands.

Also, I weigh in at about 5,400 lb with a full tank of fuel and my recovery gear (but no camping gear or spare fuel). What weight winch should I aim for?
 
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Lipek

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I personally am a great fan of Superwinch Talon. I've had it for a couple of years on my FJ it has seen a ton of work in all kinds of climate and always performed flawlessly.
@TreXTerra you should shot for a 10,000lb winch.
 
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Ranger

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I got a superwinch 8500, which for my 4runner is plenty, especially with some snatch blocks and thinking. Amazon, $299 shipped.
 

Comanche

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I'm in the winch market myself. It will my very first vehicle mod. I have narrowed it down the three models all in the same price ball park.
The gross GVR listed on the door is 5700 so according to the internetz I should be looking for a winch with a capacity of >8550 .
a. Quadratec Q9500is with real dyneema rope $499
b. Smittybuilt X2O synthetic $549
c. Warn M8000 $579
People swear by the warn and say it's bullet proof. I've been assured it should be plenty winch for my 4 door jeep, but I'm leaning toward the Quadratec.
The quandary is that I don't expect to use it very often, but absolutely need it to work when I do.
This was why I was told to steer clear of Warn's imported line of VR winches.
 
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expeditionnorth

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I bought the smittybilt 12K comp (synthetic line) since I want double the power of what the rig weighs fully loaded
nothing to complain about so far a year later
I have yet to get stuck to use it fully
initial line loading & testing was most impressive
I got it shipped to the door for around $550
 
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Cory1139

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I'm looking at getting a winch. I think I prefer synthetic rope but I really don't pay the price for it. My biggest concern is maintenance of a cable line vs. a synthetic line. Is there that much difference?
 
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4xFar Adventures

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I think the biggest maintenance issue with steel is keeping it from kinking. That's probably the fastest way to ruin the cable. Rust to a lesser degree, can be mitigated by a light application of oil/silicone spray. If it's sprayed directly on the line it'll get gummy and attract everything on the ground and work its way inside the cable strands. Instead, spray some on an old rag and wipe it down the length of the cable. This is probably only needed a couple times of year depending on where you live. Road salt in the winter can wreak havoc so maybe a winch cover would be a good investment.

Back to the kinking of steel cable. If you attach the hook/thimble outside the fairlead and onto a shackle on your bumper, change where you attach it from time to time. This will help prevent the line getting permanently deformed when it gets cinched from spooling in. Keep an eye as the cable is being wound back onto the drum. When it's not under a load it can form a gap between the wraps and then cross over itself. If it's close to the drum and then winched under a heavy load, the outer wrap s (or layers) can pinch the cable between the gaps, causing a kink.

A similar thing can happen when the cable is spooled out and wants to coil around itself. If this happens, and the winch exerts a load on the cable, it can draw the cable tight and the coil will form a kink. Before attaching the hook/thimble make sure there are no coils in the cable. The same thing applies when using any flat strap for recovery as well.

A kink in steel cable will be the weak point. Multiple kinks will lead to even more strength degradation over the entire length of cable and becomes the likely place for the cable to fail/break. Tying a knot in synthetic line has a similar effect. The tighter curvature in the knot will take more load than the outer, putting more load on fewer strands. This can generate a lot of heat and cause the line to actually melt. I have a piece of rope from a friend that got cut initially through a couple strands and the rest actually melted together as the winch kept pulling it apart. Pretty crazy to see, knowing that the melting point of Dyneema is around 300*F!
 
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boehml

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I'm looking at getting a winch. I think I prefer synthetic rope but I really don't pay the price for it. My biggest concern is maintenance of a cable line vs. a synthetic line. Is there that much difference?
Synthetic rope is much safer and easier to handle, that alone is worth the price. Buy once, cry once; spend the money on synthetic in my opinion.
 
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expeditionnorth

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Synthetic rope is much safer and easier to handle, that alone is worth the price. Buy once, cry once; spend the money on synthetic in my opinion.
if it fails it drops to the ground unlike steel cable that snaps back & can kill anyone in its path

synthetic is easy to clean in a 5 gallon bucket with soap & water, stretch it apart like a chinese finger trap & remove the debris
 

maktruk

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if it fails it drops to the ground unlike steel cable that snaps back & can kill anyone in its path
No cable, strap, or rope of any kind should ever be deployed without weights installed in at least one, preferably two locations on said tether. Do not trust marketing, synthetic can also snap back in the right situations.