Re-fueling from your Gerry can | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Re-fueling from your Gerry can

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RGILL

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This has probably already been suggested but here is my two cents on trying to gas up on the trail. I have never not made a mess when pouring gas from my can into my rig. So on my last build I mounted my fuel cans higher then the gas cap, now I use a siphon bulb and transfer fuel via a hose. No more mess!! I purchased a boat siphon bulb and hose then added about a 2 foot piece of stainless tube that drops down into my fuel can. This keeps the hose in place so you don't have to fiddle with keeping it in the can.
 

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This has probably already been suggested but here is my two cents on trying to gas up on the trail. I have never not made a mess when pouring gas from my can into my rig. So on my last build I mounted my fuel cans higher then the gas cap, now I use a siphon bulb and transfer fuel via a hose. No more mess!! I purchased a boat siphon bulb and hose then added about a 2 foot piece of stainless tube that drops down into my fuel can. This keeps the hose in place so you don't have to fiddle with keeping it in the can.
I use race style cans because they are way easier to deal with and can be used without spilling anything. I have nowhere to mount cans on either of my vehicles so they either get strapped to the cargo basket of my compass ( or trailer if I have it with me) or right at the back in my tj with all windows open or top off ( usually top is fully open and hald doors open as well.)
The race cans have a hard portion at the end of the hose that hold into the fuel filler quite well, and they drain quickly. I'm shirt and the jeep is tall so I usually throw it up on my shoulder then open the air inlet and no mess.
I have considered doing exactly what you are saying though. No need to hoist up fuel on my shoulder lol.
 
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ThundahBeagle

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I use race style cans because they are way easier to deal with and can be used without spilling anything. I have nowhere to mount cans on either of my vehicles so they either get strapped to the cargo basket of my compass ( or trailer if I have it with me) or right at the back in my tj with all windows open or top off ( usually top is fully open and hald doors open as well.)
The race cans have a hard portion at the end of the hose that hold into the fuel filler quite well, and they drain quickly. I'm shirt and the jeep is tall so I usually throw it up on my shoulder then open the air inlet and no mess.
I have considered doing exactly what you are saying though. No need to hoist up fuel on my shoulder lol.
Would a kayak bilge pump, or fish tank drain pump work? Then it wouldnt matter if the cans were high or low (no comments from the peanut gallery!) and you ought to be able to move the gas, as long as the hoses reach
 

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Would a kayak bilge pump, or fish tank drain pump work? Then it wouldnt matter if the cans were high or low (no comments from the peanut gallery!) and you ought to be able to move the gas, as long as the hoses reach
I would imagine it would.the race cans have a large opening in the top before the hose. Could probably almost fit an electric sump in them lol. I am planning on building a rack for the tire carrier of my bigger jeep.to hold them, I may add a super siphon or something to list of parts lol.
 
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TahoePPV

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Would a kayak bilge pump, or fish tank drain pump work? Then it wouldnt matter if the cans were high or low (no comments from the peanut gallery!) and you ought to be able to move the gas, as long as the hoses reach
No!

At best the the internal parts would rapidly fail due to solvent action. Then there’s always a chance of a stray spark causing a fire.
 
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ThundahBeagle

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No!

At best the the internal parts would rapidly fail due to solvent action. Then there’s always a chance of a stray spark causing a fire.
Ok. However, they must make something similar that withstands the corrosive action of gasoline. You could work it by hand. I dont know exactly but I'm sure something could be rigged up.
 

mep1811

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It is JERRY can. After the German fuel can of WWII.

A super syphon is the best method I've found to transfer fuel. The trick is to have a good place to put the can above the fuel tank.
 
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M Rose

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Ok. However, they must make something similar that withstands the corrosive action of gasoline. You could work it by hand. I dont know exactly but I'm sure something could be rigged up.
It’s called the primer bulb for a boat…
Ogrmar Fuel Line Assembly 3/8" Inner Dia 5/8" Outer Dia Hose Line Marine Outboard Boat Motor RVs Fuel Assembly with Primer Bulb Steel Hose Clamps 6FT
Or the Jiggly Hose from above, or the super syphon…. Personally I just use my old pre CARB compliant spouts on my jerry cans.
 

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The super syphon hoses work great. For long trips where fuel supply can be an issue, I carry a jerrycan or two. These are mounted just above the fuel filler cap. I have attached the jerrycans in a way, that they do not even have to be removed for refueling them and also not for refilling the fueltank from the jerrycans.

Seitenansicht_Landy.JPG
 

mep1811

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The super syphon hoses work great. For long trips where fuel supply can be an issue, I carry a jerrycan or two. These are mounted just above the fuel filler cap. I have attached the jerrycans in a way, that they do not even have to be removed for refueling them and also not for refilling the fueltank from the jerrycans.

View attachment 212933
I had a similar set up on my Land Cruiser. I could refuel from the roof without removing the cans.
 

El-Dracho

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I had a similar set up on my Land Cruiser. I could refuel from the roof without removing the cans.

That's good. This makes refueling from the jerrycan very easy and you can do it right away when there is free capacity in the fueltank. This means that you don't have to carry the fuel around in jerrycans for an unnecessarily long time, which is unfavorable in terms of weight distribution, but where it is also safer, namely in the fueltank.

By the way, what just comes to my mind in addition. Please always remember that in different countries, there are different regulations for carrying jerrycans. Likewise, this can be an issue at borders in terms of customs regulations if the jerrycans are filled.
 

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Would a kayak bilge pump, or fish tank drain pump work? Then it wouldnt matter if the cans were high or low (no comments from the peanut gallery!) and you ought to be able to move the gas, as long as the hoses reach
I would be cautious using any electrical pump that was not treated for use in a hazardous environment. Its the fumes, and it just takes one spark, stay with a manual hose. Just my two-cents
 

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When old school methods work, I stick with them. Note the modified nozzle which became necessary with the advent of “unleaded” gasoline and the smaller fill tubes. I’ve rarely if ever spilled a drop of gasoline. D1122D9E-EDFF-4437-AE6D-2A133B1BE999.jpeg
 
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I would be cautious using any electrical pump that was not treated for use in a hazardous environment. Its the fumes, and it just takes one spark, stay with a manual hose. Just my two-cents
most kayak bilge pumps are manual. The corrosive nature of gasoline would be your biggest issue here, I think