OB Approved Overland Bound Comms Frequency Guide

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greydog

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Contributor III

816
Albuquerque, New Mexcio
Member #

14890

Ham Callsign
KA5KLX
Its a really good idea to go the distance and get the Ham ticket and have the CB also. But please don't stop with the technician only go for the general you wont regret it. We need all the HF guys we can get!!
 
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greydog

Rank IV

Contributor III

816
Albuquerque, New Mexcio
Member #

14890

Ham Callsign
KA5KLX
My wife and I both have the general ticket and and have had some really wonderful contacts while camped out in the mountains of Colorado. Pretty cool talking to the east coast while at eleven thousand feet!!
 
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KC2BUN

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Advocate I

1,879
Salem County NJ
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Its a really good idea to go the distance and get the Ham ticket and have the CB also. But please don't stop with the technician only go for the general you wont regret it. We need all the HF guys we can get!!
I have regrets about not getting my general ticket, then again the code was necessary when i took my test
 

RyanC

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Pathfinder I

2,268
Pinckney, MI
Member #

1410

Ham Callsign
K1RAC
I had my HF rig up at expo east but being in a valley with a very compromised vertical antenna and a not very motivated user ment I only heard one local net.
 
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KC2BUN

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Salem County NJ
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Now that is a very interesting idea.
Ive seen it used at a Field Day a decade ago. The coax coil and helium tank are the bulkiest bits
Weather balloon(36"+)
Helium and tank
Coax(100'+)
Safety line/rope(125'+)
In low/no wind conditions it works amazing
 

MTN RNR

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Advocate III

1,769
San Diego 92130
First Name
Ted
Last Name
Thompson
Member #

13782

Ham Callsign
WD6TED
I'm working on studying for my general right now. One thing that looks like it would be fun is combining overlanding with some SOTA (Summits On The Air) activities (doing HF from summits). You can do some in 2m and 70cm but most is done in HF.
 

moonpatrol

Rank I
Member

Traveler I

233
Petaluma, CA
Ham Callsign
KM6URN
Re: 146.46 — I have seen this a few places now. I am honestly wondering what the need is for a dedicated overland calling freq when we have the well established 146.52? Honest question, I am a newer ham and unfamiliar with band planning. Not knowing any better I’ve left my radio on 52 during my last few trips.
 

MTN RNR

Rank V
Member

Advocate III

1,769
San Diego 92130
First Name
Ted
Last Name
Thompson
Member #

13782

Ham Callsign
WD6TED
146.52 is the national simplex frequency for the 2m band. That's where you go to make a simplex contact with anyone who is monitoring that frequency. After making a contact it is recommended you move your conversation to another frequency within the simplex region of the 2m band (146.40 - 146.58). 146.46 is within the simplex region and is by convention the common frequency forr Overland Bound activities (and I think off-road activities in general). It's not a rule, just a convention. (Graphic below courtesy of the ARRL website).

2m band plan.jpg
 
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Kent R

Executive Director
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Influencer II

4,069
Placerville, CA
Member #

1632

Ham Callsign
K6KNT
146.460 was designated as our contact freq. because it is the unofficial off road frequency. Remember the designated channels are a starting point. I personally monitor 146.46 and 146.52. I get way more replies on .460 than .520.
 

Kent R

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Influencer II

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Placerville, CA
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Ham Callsign
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My family has always used 146.580 as our frequency for communication(pre cell phones)
thats whats so great about Ham, you have a lot of frequencies to choose from. Here in the Sierra Foothills it is common for people to use 146.400 as a secondary trail frequency. It works well for us mainly because it currently doesn't not interfiear with any local repeater inputs.

Each area will do something different, all we did at OB was help with a starting point.

Our comms committee will be publishing information soon regarding Channels and frequencies and they will be working on organizing ham crams throughout the US.
 
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KC2BUN

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Salem County NJ
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thats whats so great about Ham, you have a lot of frequencies to choose from. Here in the Sierra Foothills it is common for people to use 146.400 as a secondary trail frequency. It works well for us mainly because it currently doesn't not interfiear with any local repeater inputs.

Each area will do something different, all we did at OB was help with a starting point.

Our comms committee will be publishing information soon regarding Channels and frequencies and they will be working on organizing ham crams throughout the US.
Sounds great, here on the east coast the interferences can be annoying. I'm considered an old ham at 35yo LoL
I think I've had my ticket for 23yrs now.
That being said if someone steps on me in simplex I boost up go high power ;) petty I know. Lately there has been alot of illegal frequency use :(
 

MTN RNR

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Advocate III

1,769
San Diego 92130
First Name
Ted
Last Name
Thompson
Member #

13782

Ham Callsign
WD6TED
Sounds great, here on the east coast the interferences can be annoying. I'm considered an old ham at 35yo LoL
I think I've had my ticket for 23yrs now.
That being said if someone steps on me in simplex I boost up go high power ;) petty I know. Lately there has been alot of illegal frequency use :(
There are quite a few illegal frequency users here in San Diego as well. When I'm home and around San Diego I primarily use repeaters rather than simplex. I find, generally speaking, that people who use the repeaters and repeater networks are licensed and more polite. Check out some of your local ham clubs. I have a hand held log periodic 5 element 2m/70cm antenna make by Elk antennas. With that I can hit repeaters easily over 100 miles away with my handheld radio. From a local summit in San Diego I could be clearly heard on a repeater on Mt. Wilson in Los Angeles over 120 miles away using only 100mW of power. It works better than the 50W transmitter in my vehicle (but I was on a 1550 ft summit). It's part of my standard overlanding equipment now. Breaks down to a small package. Arrow antennas make good yagi handheld antennas too.