Options when an electric winch is not possible

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The other Sean

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One other thing to consider, depending on vehicle, but when swapping in a winch mount, you may be removing the OEM crash bar behind the bumper cover which will negate some of the weight you are adding. When I added the winch mount to my Nissan, I found the crash bar and oem Cast tow hook were 41lbs, So, the weight of the winch mount was an addition of 0lbs, only the weight of the winch was actually added.

With that said, if you are already running a hi-lift, adding in the lift mate attachment allows you to pick up one wheel and possibly shovel material or stack something under to help get yourself out.
 
bought come along before hi lift like that but it broke frist try and later when i fixed it couldnt move car from stuck position. so those just for light winching, hi lift is for hard stuff. but first lift car with hi lift not tow.
If your hand winch broke or wouldn't pull the car then it wast rated for this type of recovery.

A hi lift takes forever to winch more than a couple inches and must be reset every 5 minutes and is a lot more dangerous.

A properly rated hand winch will always out perform a hi lift jack when winching not to mention it is a whole lot safer.

 

scalman

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this cost fortune and wieghts a ton . my come along broke by cable coming off.. but then no other car could pull my car out too so that was too hard task maybe. but again if you need winch your car , think again maybe you just need to lift it high and put something under wheels and it will drive itself. just pulling car if its stuck hard will brake something or someone.
 
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TerryD

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Any type of pulling system, be it a come-along, tirfor, Hi-Lift kit or full on winch should be rated at 1.5x the weight of your vehicle. Using a snatch block or yarding block and doubling your line is an advantage of the vehicle mounted winches and tirfors. It can be done with the Hi-Lift if needed but man is that going to take forever to get anywhere doing. Most come-alongs are already double line pull so there's not a lot you can do there.

You also never want to pull with less than a couple wraps on the drum of any come-along or winch. Warn recommends 5 wraps on the drum so that the friction of the rope against the drum is doing the pulling and not the anchor hardware on the drum.
 
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4xFar Adventures

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For your winch drum, keep a minimum of 5 wraps of steel cable on it. If you have synthetic rope, a minimum of one complete layer of rope should remain on the drum.

The Hi-Lift is great as it is not a single use tool compared to a Come-Along, and generally rated to higher WLL. For Hi-Lift winching that's 5,000 lbs. Usually I find if you have to winch with the Hi-Lift, you're better off jacking the vehicle up first and placing Maxtrax or something else with less resistance than the ground to make the winching easier. If you're in those situations often enough, you'll be better off getting a proper winch installed on the vehicle.
 
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bought come along before hi lift like that but it broke frist try and later when i fixed it couldnt move car from stuck position. so those just for light winching, hi lift is for hard stuff. but first lift car with hi lift not tow.
Most come alongs well break before doing much of a recovery. OK for light work but not pulling a 4-5k rig that is stuck.
 
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Boostpowered

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Really you should have everything a electric winch for pulling forward and rear, come alongs as backup and you can winch your rig back onto a trail from the side or filp it over in the event of rollovers, a hilift as a backup to a backup and to use as a jack, some sort of tracks whether homemade or bought will help when there is no anchor or your stuck too deep for the winch. Then there is your brain you can tie ropes to your tires and use your own rigs power to pull you out of some pretty nasty stuff. Ive gotten out of bad situations using floormats or gathered sticks/logs when i was young and didnt think recovery gear was worthwhile, where there is a will there is a way. Go slow and use your head trust me you wont be the first person to ever get out of a crappy situation on the trail just be prepared to do some sweat equity.
 

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I HAVE MOST BASES COVERED NOW (winch). But for manual use,....the Hi-Lyft with the recovery accessories....chains, shackles, etc, along with a 2 ton and 4 ton 'come-along's.
The cable pullers are easier to use, and are easier to stow. When combined with straps, you get some length versatility. That rear 'stinger' (D-shackle) in the tow receiver also gives you a solid recovery point, when 'forward' is no longer an option.
 
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Dalton Kemak

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I have read a good bit of this thread. From my experience, I started with a Smittybilt XRC4.0 on my 03 blazer then moved it to my 01 Dakota, and then my 92 XJ. Even though it was only rated at 4K, with a snatch block, it never had an issue even pulling my XJ (in her lighter years) at 3800 pounds out of a high center spot. On that note, I recently bumped up to the 9500 that they offer, but that's not relevent. I rarely need my winch, but when I do, it's worth carrying around. And backed by a good AGM battery, it has plenty of power, and without a doubt could probably drag me to a good spot on it's own should the truck decide not to run anymore. As for long pulls, I got an extra 100 feet of cable with a loop at each end that I use as a doubler when I'm way out there. It also will depend on how you wheel. I have had to use mine to pull trees from roads, or people from ditches, (Upstate NY; out here it's sunny one minute and a blizard the next). If it was me I'd put somethihng between a 4k and an 8k on the front, run some good heavy leads to it, and call it a day. Just think if it saves you from a tow bill just one time, it's paid for itself.

NOTE* Just because it says 4000 pound capacity, doesn't mean it will pull it. Pay attention to duty cycle, and at what draw. It might pull 4K, but at 185 amps, which your renegade won't handle. Duty cycle varies by manufacturer and quality. Personally, I'd shop for a smittybilt (NO AFFILLIATION) that's what's proven reliable to me.
 
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old_man

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I have run a multi mount winch setup for 20 years. You add a simple and fairly lightweight 2" receiver on either the front or rear, or both. The winch goes in a cradle and you keep it inside out of the elements. You only pull it out and hook it up when you need it. Personally I have large welding cable run to the front and back equipped with Andersen style 400A connectors. My winch still looks like new. I actually mounted a receiver in the vehicle and use it as a holder. You don't want a winch chasing your around inside a vehicle if you hit the brakes real hard or in a roll over.
 
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Desert Runner

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One of the things I also did for my recovery gear, was purchasing a JACK-MATE accessory for my Hi-Lyft jack. It helps make the jack more versatile in it's recovery persona. You can use it as a stronger end piece, than what it originally came with it. It also can be used on uneven rocks as a base that with it's pointy end, can be wedged in a rock for lifting. With it's 'chain-slot' it is safer than a hook and chain. There are 'on-line' video's That show it in use.
 

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Desert Runner

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96181 I also have this little piece of kit also. I originally bought it for use as the picture shows. HOWEVER, in reality while it will work on steel bumpers, I question it's viability on stock OEM bumpers. It will likely bend that bumper somewhat when used. That hook will however grab a bull bar like a TJM or ARB with no risk to the bumper, as they are much stronger than OEM. It can also work on a STINGER rear hitch recovery point 3/4" D-Ring. It will also work on a car haulers D-Ring tie down (welded) for a lift point up to a certain point.
 
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Desert Runner

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I'm going to look for a quality HD jumper cable carrying case for use as a bag for a winch cable extension. This would both keep it clean and protected from the elements, while allowing a wrapped/dressed cable when not in use. I have straps for this, but cable might be a good addition, while allowing the ability to anchor my truck while in France and the ''Cliffs of Dover' are the nearest recovery point. When living in the desert, and not the forest (trees/anchor points), such a scenario is not uncommon.....:anguished: I'm not kidding (tongue in cheek) Reality probably is that the "PULL PAL" would be the best option. However as many have o pinioned, this is a heavy, expensive, and bulky item, that when carrying with you takes up substantial room. The yellow recovery web strap and sand anchor ???, is best left for beach sand recoveries, and even the old bury a tire system, as some dirt environments out here needs dynamite/jack hammer to excavate in, and even a pick-ax will tax your commitment. A shovel, well, that might be a overnight commitment:sweat: A few years back I came across a couple of guys who had gotten themselves stuck in a silt bed. They had a 4x4, and a winch, but nothing within 2 miles(really) that offered a place to anchor to. After being there in 105 degree temps for 4+ hours they were real happy to see me.

I also need to go buy a 6 ton bottle jack also, as the one I used to have, blew a seal. Much cheaper to replace than repair. A set of recovery boards will be the best option for those who are not stuck in rocks. I encourage newcomers to read all the RECOVERY THREADS in OB here for ideas and direction. They will steer you into the direction your personal trek will take you. Modest outlays of money for gear can be done, especially if you like to CONVOY with friends, as others will most likely have some also. This is a good thread, that will bring a lot of options.....front and center! Watch the YOU-Tube videos Micheal and others have done also.
 
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