New to Overlanding, curious about RTT reality

  • Hi Guest, you may choose a LIGHT or DARK theme that works best for you with the "Style Chooser" button at the bottom left on this page!

Navin

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Fort Mill, SC, USA
First Name
Nate
Last Name
Harris
Ham Callsign
N5VSH
So I'm planning on outfitting my Land Cruiser for Overlanding. I've been looking at RTTs a lot lately. One thing I can't get past is that it looks like a major hassle to break camp of I want to explore during the trip. Am I over thinking this? Clearly these things are really popular. I know that a hard shell tent would go up and down much faster, but they have their drawbacks too. Perhaps I'll start with a sleeping platform and go from there?
 
  • Like
Reactions: sabjku

Dave K

Rank III

Advocate II

579
California, USA
First Name
Dave
Last Name
K
I think it really depends on what your version of overlanding is. I almost never stay in the same spot more than one night. If I did, I would probably not go rtt. I have an ARB Simpson III which is a traditional flip style tent. I find it to be a bit of a pain as much as I set up and take down. I am looking at switching to a hard shell just to make it that much faster/easier. Part of it because my cruiser is kind of tall so I end up having to climb around a lot to deal with it.

If you stay put in a camp and want to go exploring in your ride, really spend some time thinking about your setup. Shade, water, tent, cooking, etc., if any of it is attached to your rig you’ll have to deal with it in some way or another before you leave. Also, think about how you driving off with those things may affect those in your group that stay behind in camp.

If you don’t know what suits you best, buy a super cheap ground tent, a note pad and a pen. Get out on some trips and start figuring out what is best for how YOU want to do things.
 

EXPO_D1

Rank II
Member

Member I

301
Bakersfield, CA, USA
First Name
James
Last Name
C
Member #

17468

I feel obligated to answer as I recently bought a used rtt. I then proceeded to spend 9 days camping with it. I have to also tell you previously that I slept mainly in my vehicle. I did have a tent as well but prefer the safety in my vehicle. Anyways I wouldn't ever go back to a normal tent or sleeping in the vehicle. The rtt while not as convenient as I thought it might be gives me so much satisfaction. It's probably not for everyone. My pros and cons list. Pros, simple and convient(over a tent). Cons, heavy and expensive. Good luck and if possible try one out. It's what sold me on one.
 

Navin

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Fort Mill, SC, USA
First Name
Nate
Last Name
Harris
Ham Callsign
N5VSH
Thanks Dave, that's good advice. I have done lots of camping and what I like least about camping is the setup and tear down of camp. It's got to be a REALLY dry spot for my tent not to at least be damp on the bottom (well my footprint anyway). And when it rains, well that tear down is just going to suck. The hardshell RTTs look good for setup and tear down, very fast, the downside that I can figure is space for other stuff in there besides yourself. Like where do I put my shoes when I enter? If it's a rainy day am I stuck laying down all day or would a camp chair fit up there? I guess seeing one of these in person is something I need to try and do too. And some of this is just thinking out loud. My current tent is actually a 4 person tent mainly because I take off all my riding gear and store it in the tent with me at night. That way if it rains at night, or is raining when I wake up I can get dressed in the tent before I exit. Not something I would have to do in 4 wheeled overlander.
 

EXPO_D1

Rank II
Member

Member I

301
Bakersfield, CA, USA
First Name
James
Last Name
C
Member #

17468

Thanks Dave, that's good advice. I have done lots of camping and what I like least about camping is the setup and tear down of camp. It's got to be a REALLY dry spot for my tent not to at least be damp on the bottom (well my footprint anyway). And when it rains, well that tear down is just going to suck. The hardshell RTTs look good for setup and tear down, very fast, the downside that I can figure is space for other stuff in there besides yourself. Like where do I put my shoes when I enter? If it's a rainy day am I stuck laying down all day or would a camp chair fit up there? I guess seeing one of these in person is something I need to try and do too. And some of this is just thinking out loud. My current tent is actually a 4 person tent mainly because I take off all my riding gear and store it in the tent with me at night. That way if it rains at night, or is raining when I wake up I can get dressed in the tent before I exit. Not something I would have to do in 4 wheeled overlander.
Tie the laces and hang from the ladder(if it has one) . I fit all of my sleeping gear and night time/morning stuff in the tent with me. I suppose as space allows.
 

Navin

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Fort Mill, SC, USA
First Name
Nate
Last Name
Harris
Ham Callsign
N5VSH
I feel obligated to answer as I recently bought a used rtt. I then proceeded to spend 9 days camping with it. I have to also tell you previously that I slept mainly in my vehicle. I did have a tent as well but prefer the safety in my vehicle. Anyways I wouldn't ever go back to a normal tent or sleeping in the vehicle. The rtt while not as convenient as I thought it might be gives me so much satisfaction. It's probably not for everyone. My pros and cons list. Pros, simple and convient(over a tent). Cons, heavy and expensive. Good luck and if possible try one out. It's what sold me on one.
Yeah, I think I need to figure out how to try one out for sure. FWIW I have a 100 series Land Cruiser and so space would be at a premium in there as well.
 

EXPO_D1

Rank II
Member

Member I

301
Bakersfield, CA, USA
First Name
James
Last Name
C
Member #

17468

This style of rrt fitted my needs better than I knew when I bought it. As I ustand the hard shell type are easier to setup. But the simple nature sold me. It really sets up in 5ish minutes.
Romove cover.
Use ladder to unfold tent.
Remove some bungies.
Setup bed.

Photos for reference(arb Simpson rtt) IMG_20190728_154539.jpegMVIMG_20190729_081907.jpeg
 

Paris0514

Rank III
Founder 500
Member

Advocate II

628
Kansas City
First Name
Aaron
Last Name
Paris
Member #

0006

Ham Callsign
N0KTP
Hey Navin!

I have have slept in several types of tents in my life time. I have had three RTT’s; ARB, CVT, and a FSR. All three were comfortable and did as promised.

The problems RTT’s fix are:
Off the ground- security, more air movement, less mess when packing up from the ground
Mattress integrated
Normally very minimal setup and setup time

Problems RTT’s create:
Dirty cover - taking the cover off after traveling all day it is filthy, putting it back on in the morning its filthy
The Ladder- the ladder depending on model is narrow and somewhat a pain to ascend and descend (also a safety hazard for the youth and elderly and hammered)
The vehicle is fixed once deployed
Additional weight on roof of vehicle

There are some who have disdain for the RTT. There are those who want to try one because of the novelty.
Those that hate it I think didn’t know how they were intending to use it. Some they cant get beyond the issues RTTs create.

I have done several 10 day trips with my bride and kids. We were up and down every day. We didn’t mind the tear down because its reduced from that of normal ground tents.

We now have a AT Overland Habitat. It’s a great product for pickups but it to has limitations.

One of the best RTT options in my opinion is the Eezi-Awn. Their RTT’s quality is second to none. The materials and craftsmanship is really well done. The cover is also one of the better features as it has a ratchet design.

If you think you might want a hard shell version there are more and more out there. James Baroud, Bundutec, Mangollini, to name a few have been around for quite a while. Others like Eezi-Awn, CVT, and iKamper have also produced their own hard sided RTTs recently. Hard shells go up and down a little faster and cleaner.

The last option would be to forgo the RTT altogether with your current vehicle and choose something like the Oztent.

I have been really impressed with these ground tents when I have had the opportunity to see them in person. They setup quickly and there are several versions depending on what you think you want to do.

My two cents.
 

Navin

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Fort Mill, SC, USA
First Name
Nate
Last Name
Harris
Ham Callsign
N5VSH
Thanks Paris! Those Oxtents look amazing. They might be exactly what I'm looking for actually. Something like an RV3 or 4 would be great for days on location, clearly very sturdy and goes up and down very quickly. Thanks for the share!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Paris0514

Enthusiast III

As others have said the RTT really comes into it's own when you camp in a different spot each night. This is mainly because you don't have to hunt around for a place to pitch a tent. Traditional ground tents have requirements to get a good pitch on the ground -- can't be to rocky or Rooty, if it rains it's a pain, etc. RTTs eliminate all that messing.

The setup and teardown of an RTT solo is about the same as my ground tent, so it's a wash. But the ability to just 'camp' basically anywhere is where the real time is 'saved' on the trips. We used to have to hunt around all over the place for a good place to camp, and this could take well over an hour some days (or force us into maintained campgrounds with designated tent pads). The RTT means that when we decide to stop, we have never had more than 15 minutes delay between making the decision and finding a space.

There are animal protection advantages to the RTT as well, and they are more comfortable in general than ground tents (Thicker mattress, better circulation, etc.)

However our next tent will be a hard shell. Hard shells have almost all the advantages of an RTT but none of the disadvantages, especially if you buy/make the right one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sabjku

sabjku

Rank VI
Member
Supporter

Advocate I

4,327
Alexandria, VA
First Name
Steve
Last Name
B
Member #

13840

@Navin , I'll throw in my opinion, based on experience, as well. I have a Tepui Autana on my trailer(traditional soft shell tent) which I've had for a few years, an FSR hardshell power tent on my Jeep, and an Oztent. Anything that's not attached to your vehicle(ground tent, Oztent, hammock, etc) will provide a much easier route for you to get out and explore, without having a lot of time devoted to breaking camp. That's actually part of the reason I did a trailer and the Tepui in the beginning. Park the trailer, set up camp, and be free to go in the Jeep-that part is awesome. I quickly realized that bringing a trailer all the time was not going to be convenient, so I went the Oztent route. I definitely like the Oztent setup, but it's not a RTT, and there's something to be said from a security perspective with RTT's-being up off the ground is nice.

I recently decided to do a Rhino Rack on the Jeep and picked up the FSR hardshell. By far, this is the absolute best set up for me. It's all on the Jeep, it deploys SO much easier than a soft shell tent, and breaks down even easier. I have no problems with the minimal time it takes now to pack the tent up and hit the trail. I wish I would have just went the hardshell route in the beginning, but you never know until you try.
 

Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

4,149
On the road in North America
Member #

6589

I'll throw my two cents in here.

I've used all kinds of shelter over the more than fifty years (I know, I can't believe it when I count it up) I've been wandering and camping, from tarps over a rope between trees to fancy two room ground tents with floors, to vans with cupboards and counters. I have to say having a hardshell RTT is the best single solution to having quick up/quick down shelter I've ever used. It's always ready to go in any kind of weather, for just one night or more, or even if moving around during the day. No need to find a flat smooth piece of ground big enough for your tent--which can be difficult in some backcountry places. Just anywhere you can pull your vehicle will work when you have a RTT.

PREFERENCE: Even if I did not have it on my trailer, I'd keep it and put it on my van or more regular height vehicle, I like it that much. It is just such an easy, comfortable, solution. It has been completely trouble and maintenance free. Bought mine used from a guy who used it on a trip with his son, then didn't want it any more. I didn't think I'd like it at first, I really didn't, and got it primarily for company, along with an OZTent RV-5, which is THE best ground tent ever, but has proven to be too much of a package to haul around regularly.

Everyone who slept in the hardshell said how much they dug it, never slept better, how comfy, etc. So I started using it and now I hate giving it up when others come to camp. I haven't brought my OZTent in over a year. Might sell it, actually.

MOVING REGULARLY: Even when traveling with my adult kid and moving around more than I do when solo camping, we'd stop in a roadside pull off, overnight it in a park, or could use it for afternoon naps or to get out of the sun. Undo four latches, give it a shove, and it pops open ready for either of us to use. All bedding, sleeping bag, comforter, pillow, paper towels, LED light, all stay right up there when it's closed. Closes up just about as quick, so no big deal to close up if you want to run into town or go exploring. Seriously, not cumbersome in the least to open or close back up.

LADDER: It really is no big deal either, not at all. I'm retirement age and have had this tent out camping somewhere around 500 nights in the last 22 months. I don't find the ladder too narrow or too hard to navigate getting in or out, daytime or nighttime. It's a ladder. If you've ever used an extension ladder, this is no different, just nowhere near as tall.

Kids love it and none have had a problem crawling up there or getting down. They always want go up in the tent to read, nap, or play house when in camp. I haven't met a kid yet who didn't know how to climb all over a jungle jim or huge playground set; getting in and out of this hardshell RTT is easier.

And, I have never had a hard time at all with the ladder after having a mess of beers.

RELAXING: Perfect for chilling on a rainy day even without an annex,--I do it all the time--though I am designing a snap-on or hook-n-looped cover/annex to cover the ladder/entry side that will contain my shower and potty area and do double duty as a changing area on the ground. I doubt I'll use it as an area in which to hang out, though, when the RTT is right up the ladder.

FOOTWEAR, PERSONAL STUFF IN THE TENT: What I do is keep a TV tray up there at the corner by my shoulder and a regular small doormat inside at a corner by my feet. I tried keeping my boots hanging right outside, but they stay drier and gather less morning dew if inside. I use the TV tray for keeping a cup from spilling or a bottle of water from tipping over, and books, flashlight, whatever I want to keep from rolling away or getting lost in the covers.

Here's an image or two of using it in different situations but for quick overnights:

roaddude_milkyway-over-lowm-8879-900.jpg

Borderlands in West Texas when I didn't even bother raising the rack or setting up anything else but a table and chair. Just undid four latches and gave the top half a shove. Looks small when seen with the trailer and canoe, but is 54" wide and 82" long inside. Plenty roomy for two adults, and even a kid if all family.


padrens_1145-1000.jpg

Beach camping on the Gulf of Mexico. Pulled in here after dark and popped the tent up in minutes, again, not even bothering to raise the rack or get out other gear. Got my bike out in the morning to scout down the beach.


swissarmytrailer_8081-900.jpg


Last week or so lake camping in the woods of New Hampshire, ready for big rain with the whole awning out and four corner extensions up and rigged. The RTT is perfect in the rain: I usually leave both end window covers zipped down about 4-5 inches even in heavy rain without water getting in, and the entry flap not zipped down at all, just screened, because it has the little awning over it with side walls.

After having this hard shell RTT and using it so much over the last couple years, you couldn't convince me to even try a folding RTT for myself. No cover to mess with or store or have cover half your vehicle when off, and I have a hard surface on which I can strap my solar panels or other gear when driving, and take 'em off when in camp.

There are a lot of hard shell vendors out there, and some are made in the same two or three factories, just private labeled. I've learned you don't have to pay top dollar for the bigger names to have a product that will last and serve you well.
 
Last edited:

Navin

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Fort Mill, SC, USA
First Name
Nate
Last Name
Harris
Ham Callsign
N5VSH
I'll throw my two cents in here.

I've used all kinds of shelter over the more than fifty years (I know, I can't believe it when I count it up) I've been wandering and camping, from tarps over a rope between trees to fancy two room ground tents with floors, to vans with cupboards and counters. I have to say having a hardshell RTT is the best single solution to having quick up/quick down shelter I've ever used. It's always ready to go in any kind of weather, for just one night or more, or even if moving around during the day. No need to find a flat smooth piece of ground big enough for your tent--which can be difficult in some backcountry places. Just anywhere you can pull your vehicle will work when you have a RTT.

PREFERENCE: Even if I did not have it on my trailer, I'd keep it and put it on my van or more regular height vehicle, I like it that much. It is just such an easy, comfortable, solution. It has been completely trouble and maintenance free. Bought mine used from a guy who used it on a trip with his son, then didn't want it any more. I didn't think I'd like it at first, I really didn't, and got it primarily for company, along with an OZTent RV-5, which is THE best ground tent over, but has proven to be too much of a package to haul around regularly.

Then everyone who slept in the hardshell said how much they dug it, never slept better, how comfy, etc. So I started using it and now I hate giving it up when others come to camp. I haven't brought my OZTent in over a year. Might sell it, actually.

MOVING REGULARLY: Even when traveling with my adult kid and moving around more than I do when solo camping, we'd stop in a roadside pull off, overnight it in a park, or could use it for afternoon naps or to get out of the sun. Undo four latches, give it a shove, and it pops open ready for either of us to use. All bedding, sleeping bag, comforter, pillow, paper towels, LED light, all stay right up there when it's closed. Closes up just about as quick, so no big deal to close up if you want to run into town or go exploring. Seriously, not cumbersome in the least to open or close back up.

LADDER: It really is no big deal either, not at all. I'm retirement age and have had this tent out camping somewhere around 500 nights in the last 22 months. I don't find the ladder too narrow or too hard to navigate getting in or out, daytime or nighttime. It's a ladder. If you've ever used an extension ladder, this is no different, just nowhere near as tall.

Kids love it and none have had a problem crawling up there or getting down. They always want go up in the tent to read, nap, or play house when in camp. I havent met a kid yet who didn't know how to climb all over a jungle jim or huge playground set; getting in and out of this hardshell RTT is easier.

And, I have never had a hard time at all with the ladder after having a mess of beers.

RELAXING: Perfect for chilling on a rainy day even without an annex,--I do it all the time--though I am designing a snap-on or hook-n-looped cover/annex for the ladder/entry side that will contain my shower and potty area and do double duty as a changing area on the ground. I doubt I'll use it as an area in which to hang out, though, when the RTT is right up the ladder.

FOOTWEAR, PERSONAL STUFF IN THE TENT: What I do is keep a TV tray up there at the corner by my shoulder and a regular small doormat inside at a corner by my feet . I tried keeping my boots hanging right outside, but they stay drier and gather less morning dew if inside. I use the TV tray for keeping a cup from spilling and books, flashlight, whatever I want to keep from rolling away or getting lost in the covers.

Here's an image or two of using it in different situations but for quick overnights:

View attachment 113428

Borderlands in West Texas when I didn't even bother raising the rack or setting up anything else but a table and chair. Just undid four latches and gave the top half a shove. Looks small when seen with the trailer and canoe, but is 54" wide and 82" long inside. Plenty roomy for two adults, and even a kid if all family.


View attachment 113431

Beach camping on the Gulf of Mexico. Pulled in here after dark and popped the tent up in minutes, again, not even bothering to raise the rack or get out other gear. Got my bike out in the morning to scout down the beach.


View attachment 113435


Last week lake camping in the woods of New Hampshire, ready for big rain with the whole awning out and four corner extensions up and rigged. The RTT is perfect in the rain: I usually leave both end window covers down about half-two thirds open, and the entry flap not zipped down at all, just screened.

After having this hard shell RTT and using it so much over the last couple years, you couldn't convince me to even try a folding RTT for myself. No cover to mess with or store or have cover half your vehicle, and I have a hard surface on which I can strap my solar panels or other gear when driving, and take 'em off when in camp.

There are a lot of hard shell vendors out there, and some are made in the same two or three factories, just private labeled. I've learned you don't have to pay top dollar for the bigger names to have a product that will last and serve you well.
Thanks Road, I think this has solidified my decision for a hardshell RTT.
 

100RNR

Rank V
Member

Traveler I

I'll throw my two cents in here.

I've used all kinds of shelter over the more than fifty years (I know, I can't believe it when I count it up) I've been wandering and camping, from tarps over a rope between trees to fancy two room ground tents with floors, to vans with cupboards and counters. I have to say having a hardshell RTT is the best single solution to having quick up/quick down shelter I've ever used. It's always ready to go in any kind of weather, for just one night or more, or even if moving around during the day. No need to find a flat smooth piece of ground big enough for your tent--which can be difficult in some backcountry places. Just anywhere you can pull your vehicle will work when you have a RTT.

PREFERENCE: Even if I did not have it on my trailer, I'd keep it and put it on my van or more regular height vehicle, I like it that much. It is just such an easy, comfortable, solution. It has been completely trouble and maintenance free. Bought mine used from a guy who used it on a trip with his son, then didn't want it any more. I didn't think I'd like it at first, I really didn't, and got it primarily for company, along with an OZTent RV-5, which is THE best ground tent over, but has proven to be too much of a package to haul around regularly.

Then everyone who slept in the hardshell said how much they dug it, never slept better, how comfy, etc. So I started using it and now I hate giving it up when others come to camp. I haven't brought my OZTent in over a year. Might sell it, actually.

MOVING REGULARLY: Even when traveling with my adult kid and moving around more than I do when solo camping, we'd stop in a roadside pull off, overnight it in a park, or could use it for afternoon naps or to get out of the sun. Undo four latches, give it a shove, and it pops open ready for either of us to use. All bedding, sleeping bag, comforter, pillow, paper towels, LED light, all stay right up there when it's closed. Closes up just about as quick, so no big deal to close up if you want to run into town or go exploring. Seriously, not cumbersome in the least to open or close back up.

LADDER: It really is no big deal either, not at all. I'm retirement age and have had this tent out camping somewhere around 500 nights in the last 22 months. I don't find the ladder too narrow or too hard to navigate getting in or out, daytime or nighttime. It's a ladder. If you've ever used an extension ladder, this is no different, just nowhere near as tall.

Kids love it and none have had a problem crawling up there or getting down. They always want go up in the tent to read, nap, or play house when in camp. I havent met a kid yet who didn't know how to climb all over a jungle jim or huge playground set; getting in and out of this hardshell RTT is easier.

And, I have never had a hard time at all with the ladder after having a mess of beers.

RELAXING: Perfect for chilling on a rainy day even without an annex,--I do it all the time--though I am designing a snap-on or hook-n-looped cover/annex for the ladder/entry side that will contain my shower and potty area and do double duty as a changing area on the ground. I doubt I'll use it as an area in which to hang out, though, when the RTT is right up the ladder.

FOOTWEAR, PERSONAL STUFF IN THE TENT: What I do is keep a TV tray up there at the corner by my shoulder and a regular small doormat inside at a corner by my feet . I tried keeping my boots hanging right outside, but they stay drier and gather less morning dew if inside. I use the TV tray for keeping a cup from spilling and books, flashlight, whatever I want to keep from rolling away or getting lost in the covers.

Here's an image or two of using it in different situations but for quick overnights:

View attachment 113428

Borderlands in West Texas when I didn't even bother raising the rack or setting up anything else but a table and chair. Just undid four latches and gave the top half a shove. Looks small when seen with the trailer and canoe, but is 54" wide and 82" long inside. Plenty roomy for two adults, and even a kid if all family.


View attachment 113431

Beach camping on the Gulf of Mexico. Pulled in here after dark and popped the tent up in minutes, again, not even bothering to raise the rack or get out other gear. Got my bike out in the morning to scout down the beach.


View attachment 113435


Last week lake camping in the woods of New Hampshire, ready for big rain with the whole awning out and four corner extensions up and rigged. The RTT is perfect in the rain: I usually leave both end window covers down about half-two thirds open, and the entry flap not zipped down at all, just screened.

After having this hard shell RTT and using it so much over the last couple years, you couldn't convince me to even try a folding RTT for myself. No cover to mess with or store or have cover half your vehicle, and I have a hard surface on which I can strap my solar panels or other gear when driving, and take 'em off when in camp.

There are a lot of hard shell vendors out there, and some are made in the same two or three factories, just private labeled. I've learned you don't have to pay top dollar for the bigger names to have a product that will last and serve you well.
Pretty much everything he said, with little variation.
Love my RTT.P1030080.JPG
 

PNW EXPLR

Rank VI
Member
Supporter +

Influencer I

3,898
Kennewick, WA, USA
First Name
Michael
Last Name
Denniston
Member #

3030

Thanks Dave, that's good advice. I have done lots of camping and what I like least about camping is the setup and tear down of camp. It's got to be a REALLY dry spot for my tent not to at least be damp on the bottom (well my footprint anyway). And when it rains, well that tear down is just going to suck. The hardshell RTTs look good for setup and tear down, very fast, the downside that I can figure is space for other stuff in there besides yourself. Like where do I put my shoes when I enter? If it's a rainy day am I stuck laying down all day or would a camp chair fit up there? I guess seeing one of these in person is something I need to try and do too. And some of this is just thinking out loud. My current tent is actually a 4 person tent mainly because I take off all my riding gear and store it in the tent with me at night. That way if it rains at night, or is raining when I wake up I can get dressed in the tent before I exit. Not something I would have to do in 4 wheeled overlander.
It will depend on the tent you choose wether it will have space to store stuff. I am able to leave all bedding and real pillows in mine.
As far as rainy days go, remember, you can also install an awning. Now you can hang out outside in you chair instead of the tent.
There are hanging storage bags for shoes and other stuff.
It takes me just a few minutes to bring my tent down if I want to explore.
 

ScottE

Rank VI
Member

Traveler III

3,338
Austin, TX
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Etkin
Member #

13439

So I'm planning on outfitting my Land Cruiser for Overlanding. I've been looking at RTTs a lot lately. One thing I can't get past is that it looks like a major hassle to break camp of I want to explore during the trip. Am I over thinking this? Clearly these things are really popular. I know that a hard shell tent would go up and down much faster, but they have their drawbacks too. Perhaps I'll start with a sleeping platform and go from there?
20190529_163846.jpg

Breaking down camp is supper easy. Even if I camp in the same spot setup and take down are really easy. Go out and explore and setup back up in no time.