Need An Overland Vehichle | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Need An Overland Vehichle

Discussion in 'General Overland Discussion' started by Bobert_60, Dec 5, 2018.

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  1. Bobert_60

    Bobert_60 Rank I
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    Location:
    Kansas
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    Hi everyone, I've been looking at overlanding for awhile now and I was just about to take the plunge last week, but unfortunately I totaled my Jeep Wrangler TJ in a winter storm, yikes!
    Originally I was thinking about just buying another TJ but the main reason I'm hesitant is because of how loud it is on the highway, I don't think I can sit for more than 3 hours straight in the darn thing, which is a shame because I love everything else about it. She did pretty well off-road too.

    Long story short I'm 18, I have 15K to play with and I want a moderately capable vehicle in its stock form, that's easy to work on (I'm pretty mechanically inclined, working on that TJ was easy as heck)
    I also want a vehicle with a manual transmission, something about it just makes me feel really nice, I don't hate automatics but I would much rather drive a stick.

    15K
    Easy to Work on
    Reliable
    Manual Trans
    Moderately Comfortable

    One vehicle Ive been looking at in particular is the Toyota FJ cruiser, and there are a few 2007 model years around my area that fit the budget.

    Thanks for all your input
     
    TacoVenturer87 likes this.
  2. Arailt

    Arailt Rank III
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    FJs are nice. You could get a manual second gen Tacoma in your price range.

    You could always snag an 80 or 100 Series Cruiser, 4th gen 4Runner, or GX470 in your price range as well. No manuals though.

    All capable, reliable, and very comfortable.
     
    Cdaug, Bobert_60 and PB&Me like this.
  3. Fozzy325

    Fozzy325 Rank III
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    Here is my 2 pence,
    Toyota is almost always reliable
    Standard transmission has limited you to the FJ - I love standard and I would love it if every vehicle still sold it. But Automatic comes with so many cool things with downhill decent, automatic dif loc, better fuel economy two les things to worry about in tricky situations off roading.
    moderately comfortable - don't get a jeep again.

    make sure its 4wd as you can get 2wd versions of the FJ
    MASSIVE risk is the MASSIVE blind spot when looking behind right. no window to see cars in in your mirror blind spot.

    Don't spend all 15k now but save some to upgrade things like suspension lift, wheels, and overland gear

    I looked on carguru, -
    Here are some other options
    2005 Toyota 4Runner SR5 V6 4WD - $12,995
    2004 Toyota Tacoma 2 Dr V6 4WD Extended Cab LB - $12,900 - Kansas City, KS This is a sweet looking ride
    2006 Toyota Tundra Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB - $12,950 - Harrisonville, MO - has winch and offroad tyres
     

    Attached Files:

    Bobert_60 likes this.
  4. smritte

    smritte Rank III
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    Location:
    Ontario California
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    You wont go wrong with the FJ. When you look into a new automotive hobby or sport, you need to look at the aftermarket support. For off-road that would be Toyota and Jeep. When it comes down to dependability and resale, now were talking Toyota. I have owned many Toyota's and Jeeps. Each one has a purpose. My 04 TJ is heavily modded, some of them were done to repair the poor engineering done by Jeep. My Land Cruiser is fairly modded, there are no real engineering issues to worry about. I have driven my TJ on multi day trips. Nice squishy suspension and good seats made for a pleasant trip. When I got my Cruiser is when I realized the Jeep wasn't that comfy after all. Ive done more repairs to the Jeep over the years from parts failing that have nothing to do with my mod's or the way I drive (radiator,water pump,crank sensor...). The cruiser its just normal stuff. Jeep just turned 60k and cruiser 220k.
    I have never owned a 4 Runner. My son has one as do several of my friends. Nice vehicles. I was looking at the FJ and wasn't happy with the layout. There's a bunch of people who like them though.
    There's my 2 cent's opinion.

    Oh...I can sleep in the cruiser, try that in the TJ.

    Scott
     
  5. Jeff B

    Jeff B Rank II
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    I have a TJ and a JK, so I know where you are coming from with the TJ. They are great fun. Like the previous posters have said, get something that will be reliable, especially if you are going into back country. Having the extra room in a slightly bigger vehicle is nice. I would recommend the Toyotas as mentioned above, but also Nissan Pathfinders and Frontiers. They are also reliable. My father has an 06 Pathfinder that is great and has tons of room, power, and is decent off road in stock form with street tires.
     
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  6. Bobert_60

    Bobert_60 Rank I
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    Kansas
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    #6 Bobert_60, Dec 5, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
    Space was definitely a issue with the TJ, unless I go with an LJ (Tj unlimited- has a longer wheelbase) its unlikely that ill get another jeep.
    I actually prefer finding a vehicle as stock as I can because building it is half the fun imo, also the 15k is just for the purchase of the platform. I have a bit more money saved for mods.

    Also cant say that I like the 4th gen 4runner, my parents have a 5th gen and I like that one much more. Idk I think the 4th gen just looks too bubbley I guess. I like sharp edges lol

    Edit: also I know Toyotas are reliable as all heck but most of the options I'm seeing have 120k+ miles
    this is also going to be my DD so are any alarm bells ringing with mileage that high?
     
  7. Fozzy325

    Fozzy325 Rank III
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    Now if you want an awesome vehicle and want to work on it then a Land Rover Discovery II, reliability is a bit of an issue and it needs to be a vehicle by a mechanically minded driver.
     
  8. Arailt

    Arailt Rank III
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    A Toyota is just getting broken in around 120k. Just make sure you can verify the proper maintenance has been performed throughout the life of the vehicle (regular oil changes, diff fluid around 60k, timing belt around 90k if it has a timing belt, etc.).

    I know I’m not making friends here, but if reliability is a concern, I would steer clear of Jeep. I’ve owned three and none of them made it past 60k without issues. Water pumps, o2 sensors, electrical gremlins galore.
     
  9. smritte

    smritte Rank III
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    What he said.

    Scott
     
  10. Bobert_60

    Bobert_60 Rank I
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    as much as I loved my tj I definitely feel ya, I ended up replacing the entire front suspension (myself of course) it wasn't too much of an issue for me because of how simple it is to work on a solid axle.
    One thing I know form sure though, the 4.0 straight six with a manual would chug right through a nuclear holocaust, that engine is a freaking legend.
     
  11. Arailt

    Arailt Rank III
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    I drove a 2001 TJ for 6+ years and loved it. I still miss it. Super fun vehicle. I also had a ‘99 XJ. Both with the 4.0. I always hear how bulletproof that motor is, but after two with the same problems around the same mileage, I scratch my head. Not to mention I had a rod snap and go through the block on my TJ haha

    [​IMG]

    They were really easy to work on, so that made it kind of all right. The electrical problems on both are what led me to sell them. My XJ was a mess inside. Pwr windows all failed within a year, dash and lights would work intermittently. Auto trans was sloppy at 60k. The TJ started turning my lights on/off when I used the left turn signal in the rain. Chased wires for hours. Never found a solution. Both vehicles were relatively stock, meticulously maintained, and neither had any electrical accessories/upgrades.

    Conversely, I pushed my ‘09 Tacoma way harder than I did either of the Jeeps. Lifted it with larger tires, used it to haul way more than it was rated for on a fairly regular basis. Never had a problem.
     
  12. Ben Cleveland

    Ben Cleveland Rank IV
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    As far as Toyota is concerned, see what everybody else said above. I agree.

    As far as how much to spend, I'm going to suggest something a bit different. Don't save a lot of that 15K for mods. Spend almost all of it on the vehicle itself, save like 1000 for repairs. If you still have some left after a year or so, then start dropping it on mods.

    At 18, the last thing you need is a vehicle that's randomly failing and giving you expensive repair bills. And while toyotas are quite reliable, the difference in age and remaining life is large if you compare a or 10K vehicle to a 14K one.

    For example. I purchased my 2003 4runner, with 197K on it, for $6000. This year it cost me over 2500 in unexpected AC repairs. That's not the same as a hub or water pump that you can change out in your driveway. I do all my own repair work, except for AC and alignments. The thing is, this rig is a reliable rig! Its just 15 years old, and has 200K miles on it. And parts failed. So do yourself a favor, while your earning potential is about the lowest its ever going to be, get yourself a rig that is a little newer and has more life left in it, so you won't have to worry about fixing it, and can spend more time, money and energy on increasing that earning potential (IE college, trade school, fill in the blank).

    Just my opinion, its worth about what you paid for it ;)
     
  13. Fozzy325

    Fozzy325 Rank III
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    Great thing about this forum is the wealth of experience. You have heard from several different people and their advice.
    All you need to do is read through them and try to understand what everyone is saying.
    Understand what your long and short term situation is and fit the advice around it
     
    TacoVenturer87 likes this.
  14. Cpol

    Cpol Rank VI
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    E3576E2E-B278-49B7-8858-9C5672292964.jpeg Tacoma is the way to go
     
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  15. Kipp

    Kipp Rank I
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    I have to agree with a lot of people - get a Tacoma - I’ve owned two jeeps and three Tacomas. Two door jeeps were my favorite - doors off, top off, great on trails and even around town. Not that fun on the highway and I had too many mechanical issues with both of them. Tacomas were bullet proof - never an issue - still great on trails and good on the highway. Get a cap and you have an inexpensive place to sleep.

    I like the FJ, but really hated the blind spot when I drove a friends FJ.
     
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  16. ZThunder98

    ZThunder98 Rank I
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    Buy a older jk Rubicon even if you have to pick it up out of state 14 or 15 k will get you a nice 2 or 4 door
     
  17. Knitron

    Knitron Rank III
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    I drive a 99 GMC Yukon. Yeah she's a little bigger, but she's solid, easy to work on. I can find parts anywhere for dirt cheap, and I haven't had to do much too it all. She's quiet and confortable.
     
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  18. TacoVenturer87

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    If the vehicle you're looking at has been modified, MAKE SURE it was done properly. Spend $50 or more and have a mechanic you trust come with you to take a look at it.
    As for picks: all your choices are good, pick the vehicle that fits your lifestyle best!
    Lastly, like everyone said, make sure you get a good rig and don't cheap out on something that will keep you going in the remote places we tend to get haha

    Stay safe and have fun.

    Keep us posted!
    My Taco below :)
    20180929_155519.jpeg
     
    Arailt likes this.
  19. 79 GMCbeast

    79 GMCbeast Rank I

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    "Overlanding vehicle" in todays definition of "overlanding vehicle" 15k will get you some wheels, tires and maybe a scottle. A tacoma with a 4×4 camper was for sale at Expo East for 90k ...yes' Tacoma..hahah"Easy to work on" hmmm are u a mechanic/technician? Look, buy something that can be your daily, along with suiting your needs to "overland" whatever your definition of o overlanding is. You dont need to break the bank, and buy all the unnecessary bullshit thats on the market that is labeled "overland" Michael and Corey have well over 200k on their rig, and they keep it simple. MY truck is a 1979 GMC jimmy. I have a beed platform, on board air compressor and 5 gal water tank for drinking and an occasional shower.
    I was getting caught up in all the hype of "whats needed to overland" but found myself not going anywhere. I was coming up with every excuse as to why i wasnt ready to travel. When i did finally get out, i soon realized i didnt need have the crap that i spent shit loads of money on. The basic necessities is what i needed. Food, water, first aid, fuel for cooking and heat along with of course a kitchen setup/coleman stove. Ive What i felt most relevant :
    A capable rig
    recovery gear
    tools for repairs,
    tire repair and
    multiple sources of communication. Cell, cb, and ham, and yes ive used all 3.
    Ive learned from the following
    (#0582) Dan Rich is a perfect example. His term "form follows fuction" nails it. See Michaels rig walk aroung on Dan Toyota
    @overlandbound
    @primaloutdoors
    @coyoteworks
    @liveworkwonder

    Beginners like @trailspinTV, the expo west series was very helpful coming from a beginner's standpoint.
    Anyway, ive rambled way too much..just get out and do this shit! Good luck
     
  20. Wanderer

    Wanderer Rank 0

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    Carlsbad CA
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    I have been a jeep guy for along long time starting with my first in 1977 cj7 golden eagle i am a geologist so i get to spend alot of time off road there are many good choices out there and as iook back i often rememberbthis big old beast chevy suburban i drovebit through a blizzrd out of jackson hole one year wherebyou couldnt even see anything but some tracks in the snow this was the lsst of the old k style bodies a 3/4 ton with a 350 auto the thing had captains chairs wher both arms folded down like an easy chair an an auto locker the about a rig like that is you coukd do alot theres always parts you could go with an rtt or aluminess style rtt the other thig to consider is a toyota pu the older one with a pop up little camper
     

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