Is Goose Gear worth the money?

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MMc

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Funny, I was a co-owner for a company the made fly material boxes for fly tiers. They are very complex and were labor intensive. We always heard I have something like that I made for a tenth of the your price. We were a for profit business not for fun. We had tools, not the weekender tools but high end cabinetry tools. The time it took to design and prototype it was a major expense. We often would prototype and make a changes as we used the product. All of those cost adds up and need to be recovered. You can’t compare what you do at home to what a business needs to do. When you add up all cost to run a business, overhead, market and generate a profit it’s tough to do. Goose Gear is a very good product and is a fair price, the fit and finish are very good and you are buying the design and the time it takes perfect it. If you want to design and fab a product do it, remember to add you time to the cost, and ask yourself, is this a cost executive to me? This doesn’t factor your personal enjoyment, which can be a big factor. Your mileage may vary.
 

Vanhalo

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@Vanhalo

Hide this message from your SO. :) As the baseplate could be made with a jigsaw, handdrill/driver, some drillbits, hardware, glue, and sanding paper/block. If this was all you were building you can get all the tools for under $100 at china freight/princess auto.

Heck for under a grand you could get a maslow cnc, router, and computer to run it.

Boort
Well I wish I had known about the Maslow.

I ran a CNC machine back in the 90s.

I always put my projects on Autocad 1st.
 

Boort

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@bgenlvtex

Sure, what would you like to know?
The Maslow was a low cost (<$1k to be up and running) Kickstarter project with a fairly large open source community similar to OB. There are a number of small companies now building kits and the community has been building and improving CNC system and software capable of working with 4x8 sheets of plywood. The main site is available at Maslow that hosts the main community and forums and the satellite companies run a handful of other websites offering full kits and design improvements. These setups are NOT going to be as fast or accurate as a typical entry level flying gantry CNC like the Shopbot or a commercial CNC, but it costs less than $1k, takes up far less floor space in the home shop and once tuned are accurate enough to produce large items like a custom baseplate.

You program the tools with various software packages from free Open source tools (MakerCAM, Inkscape, Freecad) up to fullblown commercial Aspire3d, Autocad, etc. Please understand that there will be a learning curve with any of these tools as well as setting up and tuning even with one of the "hit the ground running" kits. If you want it done quick the jigsaw, drill and a set of custom cardboard templates traced with a pencil and fender washer would be be the way to go.

@Vanhalo
It's a really cool project. I really miss my local Makerspace where I had access to a 4x8 Shopbot, a CNC Laser cutter, 4x8 shopbot converted to plasma cutter, and just about every other awesome maker tool for wood metal automotive and even sewing and other "soft arts"! I still have my little home built CNC router and if I ever get around to purging my garage of old projects that I don't seem to ever finish, I'll have a Maslow mounted on one wall just for projects like this.

@MMc
Please don't misunderstand my comment as belittling GooseGear or any of the others producing products in this space. Elsewhere on this forum I have posted a full cost and time breakdown for my custom 2 drawer setup showing that even excluding time and tooling the materials cost was ~1/2 of a low cost commercial setup and ~1/3 of the closest GG setup. I fully understand that much of their cost is a result of how much time goes into the R&D of their products so that they fit right the first time in their customer's vehicle and work with the rest of their drawers, slides and other accessories. As I mention earlier in this thread I have access to a full wood shop (probably worth every bit of the $6k + Vanhalo mentioned) and have mentioned in other threads how DIY is a factor of trading time for money. Woodworking happens to be a hobby of mine and a way that I get to spend quality time with my Dad so I'm often willing to trade time in the shop and save some of my cash for spending on gas for trips. (Hopefully with dad and/or other friends.)

My comment was meant to point out to those who WANT a custom baseplate system for their rig (that may or may not be commercially available at any cost depending on their rig) a baseplate is really only a piece of plywood that is cut and drilled to fit in their vehicle and it does not need to cost a lot of cash to get to that end result.

Boort
 
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MMc

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@MMc
Please don't misunderstand my comment as belittling GooseGear or any of the others producing products in this space. Elsewhere on this forum I have posted a full cost and time breakdown for my custom 2 drawer setup showing that even excluding time and tooling the materials cost was ~1/2 of a low cost commercial setup and ~1/3 of the closest GG setup. I fully understand that much of their cost is a result of how much time goes into the R&D of their products so that they fit right the first time in their customer's vehicle and work with the rest of their drawers, slides and other accessories. As I mention earlier in this thread I have access to a full wood shop (probably worth every bit of the $6k + Vanhalo mentioned) and have mentioned in other threads how DIY is a factor of trading time for money. Woodworking happens to be a hobby of mine and a way that I get to spend quality time with my Dad so I'm often willing to trade time in the shop and save some of my cash for spending on gas for trips. (Hopefully with dad and/or other friends.)

My comment was not directed at anybody. It was made at the posters at large that have little understanding of the cost of what it takes to run a business. I love working in wood and designing a system to secure loads in my truck now. I like what you did with the drawer setup it was detailed and well presented. Most folks look at a GG like system and think I can do it at home, some can and do, great! My point is it’s not a hobby.
I have looked at doing a 32 mm system for overlanding, being kinda retired I don’t want to put in the time and effort when I can road trip instead.
 
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SAFETYRUNNER

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Wanted to share this as I saw someone brought up 8020. I used their stuff for my rear build out. Looked at goose gear, but way too much money for what I felt like I was getting. Plus their kit wouldn’t allow the fridge size I wanted. Running a Dometic 95. Plus I used one of the boxes for storing my rear power. 8020 has some really good stuff. Extrusions are cheap, connectors not so much. But love that it is modular, and I can change it up later.
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I love how this is perfect for your needs, which makes it a great build. I have some t-slot and connectors from an old work test set-up. Looking for inspiration for my 5th Gen 4Runner. Thanks for sharing.
 

HollyMav

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Wanted to share this as I saw someone brought up 8020. I used their stuff for my rear build out. Looked at goose gear, but way too much money for what I felt like I was getting. Plus their kit wouldn’t allow the fridge size I wanted. Running a Dometic 95. Plus I used one of the boxes for storing my rear power. 8020 has some really good stuff. Extrusions are cheap, connectors not so much. But love that it is modular, and I can change it up later.
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Amazing build! Jealous of how it turned out. What slides are those? Where did you get them?
 

Boort

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What slides are those? Where did you get them?
@HollyMav

I can't speak for @deFine_overland but those slides look very similar to the Ryadon ones that I used for my Drawer system. I used their Made in USA, 3600 Series 500 LB Full Extension Lock in/Out Drawer Slides. ( http://ryadon.com/product-detail/?id=395 ) Their sales and tech support were great to work with, even on a small sale of just a few slides, both before and after the sale. There are other brands from China all over amazon but I found the cost difference was minimal and went with the Ryadon ones. After 2 years I've go no complaints.

Boort
 

TahoePPV

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@Boort @bgenlvtex thanks for that Maslow rabbit hole. I’ve been going over all the projects I’ve done or have thought about for my rig and teardrop (& kayak). Now I’m thinking of even more!
 
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smlobx

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I looked into getting a rear seat delete platform for my Gladiator but after looking at it more carefully decided to build one myself for less than $100 instead of a grand!

It came out great and I detailed the process on another forum..


You can also see a few other people who customized their designs for some additional ideas.
 
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jaymar

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Has anyone done their own GG-style panel / seat delete system for an 80 series Land Cruiser (with or without drawers/fridge?
 
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Boort

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Has anyone done their own GG-style panel / seat delete system for an 80 series Land Cruiser (with or without drawers/fridge?
I've not done the GG-style panel / seat delete but the 98 LC is really easy to pull the rear seats. I beleive that the 80 series would be very similar, if not the same. We had one 2nd row seat pulled in about 20 mins from a friend's when we needed more space for a trip. Took another 20 or so to put back in. 4-5 bolts if I remember correctly. Much easier than my 4 runner and the seats are independent so easy to pull just one side or the other w/o removing both. (again unlike my 4 runner :) )

Once the seat(s) are pulled building the panel would be a matter of:
1) Determining the height you want then Making a few spacers to lift a piece of cardboard to that height.
2) Making a cardboard template at the height you want the plywood to sit. Basically trading the edge of the truck to account for any lumps, bumps or other things you need clearance for. (Looking at the GG seat delete this looks like the front edge of the wheel well, a bit of the door pocket and the speaker bulge.)
3) After double checking your fitment of the template get a piece of 3/8 or 1/2" Baltic birch plywood and cut it to match your template. Using a sander, sand and refine the fit then sand off any saw marks on the edges to your desired appearance level.
4) With the fitted plate in place on your spacers check for level and adjust as needed.
5) Make the side plates/supports. With the plate in place make cardboard templates for the inner and outer vertical supports. (Just like steps 2 and 3 for the main plate)
6) Put dowel centers (or if less costly in your area cut up some matching metric bolts and grind to a point then thread them in so they stick up a bit) in each of the seat /seatbelt mounting holes, place the plate over and make sure it is in the right place. Press down to mark the holes for drilling the mounting holes. Drill the counter sinks and mounting through holes.
7) Mount and drill side plates/supports
8) Mark and make cutouts in top if desired
9) Finish with bedliner or paint of your choice.

Boort
 

jaymar

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SoCal
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I've not done the GG-style panel / seat delete but the 98 LC is really easy to pull the rear seats. I beleive that the 80 series would be very similar, if not the same. We had one 2nd row seat pulled in about 20 mins from a friend's when we needed more space for a trip. Took another 20 or so to put back in. 4-5 bolts if I remember correctly. Much easier than my 4 runner and the seats are independent so easy to pull just one side or the other w/o removing both. (again unlike my 4 runner :) )

Once the seat(s) are pulled building the panel would be a matter of:
1) Determining the height you want then Making a few spacers to lift a piece of cardboard to that height.
2) Making a cardboard template at the height you want the plywood to sit. Basically trading the edge of the truck to account for any lumps, bumps or other things you need clearance for. (Looking at the GG seat delete this looks like the front edge of the wheel well, a bit of the door pocket and the speaker bulge.)
3) After double checking your fitment of the template get a piece of 3/8 or 1/2" Baltic birch plywood and cut it to match your template. Using a sander, sand and refine the fit then sand off any saw marks on the edges to your desired appearance level.
4) With the fitted plate in place on your spacers check for level and adjust as needed.
5) Make the side plates/supports. With the plate in place make cardboard templates for the inner and outer vertical supports. (Just like steps 2 and 3 for the main plate)
6) Put dowel centers (or if less costly in your area cut up some matching metric bolts and grind to a point then thread them in so they stick up a bit) in each of the seat /seatbelt mounting holes, place the plate over and make sure it is in the right place. Press down to mark the holes for drilling the mounting holes. Drill the counter sinks and mounting through holes.
7) Mount and drill side plates/supports
8) Mark and make cutouts in top if desired
9) Finish with bedliner or paint of your choice.

Boort
I hadn't thought of the press-down-on-points thing; instead I was pondering the probable imprecision of measuring from the sides of the panel vs the sides of the truck to mark the right spots for the holes. :)
 
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Boort

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I hadn't thought of the press-down-on-points thing; instead I was pondering the probable imprecision of measuring from the sides of the panel vs the sides of the truck to mark the right spots for the holes. :)
Another option for locating holes on the same plane. Once you can define a reference corner you can use a 6-fold drilling guide for each hole. This tool is used by carpenters, tile installers and drywall pros to locate and drill holes for plumbing and electrical fixtures. Lots of Youtube videos on how to use one.

Boort
 
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