Hi-Lift: How many people NOT running them?

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Are you running a Hi-Lift?

  • Yes

    Votes: 57 42.5%
  • No

    Votes: 70 52.2%
  • Yes but all for looks and/or extra piece of mind

    Votes: 7 5.2%

  • Total voters
    134

RichieFromBoston

Rank V
Member

Influencer I

2,846
Nahant Ma.
Member #

3728

I carry and USE my hi lift extreme a lot, But I also really travel and really wheel. So the hilift is a go to. Lots of people claim safety, but lets remember lots of people have super duper overland rigs they dont actually crawl, climb or work on themsleves. So safety is relevant, its a tool. use it wrong and pay the price.
 

Boostpowered

Rank VI
Member

Pathfinder II

3,126
Wolfe City, TX, USA
First Name
Justin
Last Name
Davis
Member #

14684

Both farmers and handymen have figured out long ago hilifts arent the best idea. When will off roaders figure it out? Most of my hilift hate comes from experiences on the farm. If you dont fear the hilift it will give you a reason eventually given you use it alot. Im not saying dont use one just be mindful that it can injure, maim, or even kill you even if you think your doing everything safe, thats usually the most dangerous time to use it when you feel like everything going good then last thing you hear is a pop.
 
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Lindenwood

Rank V
Member

Advocate II

2,522
Ft Walton Beach, Fl
First Name
Jacob
Last Name
McDonald
Member #

2636

Both farmers and handymen have figured out long ago hilifts arent the best idea. When will off roaders figure it out? Most of my hilift hate comes from experiences on the farm. If you dont fear the hilift it will give you a reason eventually given you use it alot. Im not saying dont use one just be mindful that it can injure, maim, or even kill you even if you think your doing everything safe, thats usually the most dangerous time to use it when you feel like everything going good then last thing you hear is a pop.
Are you saying they will just break under load, or is that "pop" the sound of them slipping?
 

tjZ06

Rank V
Member

Enthusiast III

1,455
Lincoln, California, USA
First Name
TJ
Last Name
Adams
Member #

20043

I'm not running/carrying one yet - but it's "on the list." My sliders will work well for a hi-lift, and eventually I'll have bumpers I can use one on. That said, for actually changing tires (as opposed to using the hi-lift to get unstuck or other uses) I find a good bottle jack is almost always easier. Yes, you have to crawl around on the ground to setup a bottle jack under the axle, but doing-so you don't have to droop-out the whole suspension in order to lift the tire up and change it.

-TJ
 
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Boostpowered

Rank VI
Member

Pathfinder II

3,126
Wolfe City, TX, USA
First Name
Justin
Last Name
Davis
Member #

14684

Are you saying they will just break under load, or is that "pop" the sound of them slipping?
The pop sound is your bones being broken when either pins fail and rig slams to the ground , the shaft fold in half from over 8k being applied, one of the pins getting stuck causing the handle to flail like crazy or the whole rig falls over because your not on level ground or the ground is softer than thought.
 

Tupenny

Rank V
Member
Supporter

Pathfinder I

2,268
Longwood, Florida
Member #

14242

I have a hi-lift however have not needed it yet; I agree they are dangerous and also agree that many things can be under the right conditions and in the right hands. I've practiced the hi-lift and have sliders and front/rear bumper that are notched for its use. So I feel ok with it.

However I'm looking at bottle jacks also to carry and then rely on the hi-lift for a more specific situation. Something that's not changing a tire. I like the option of tool selection and the redundancy of lifting options.
 
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RoarinRow

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Elk Grove, CA, USA
First Name
Rolando
Last Name
Nispiros
Member #

17011

I don't know anyone who has ever owned a hi jack and never thought of having one or something like it until I got my lift lol. I did get a bottle jack thingy though.
 

Lindenwood

Rank V
Member

Advocate II

2,522
Ft Walton Beach, Fl
First Name
Jacob
Last Name
McDonald
Member #

2636

The pop sound is your bones being broken when either pins fail and rig slams to the ground , the shaft fold in half from over 8k being applied, one of the pins getting stuck causing the handle to flail like crazy or the whole rig falls over because your not on level ground or the ground is softer than thought.
Well that all just seems a little dramatic....
 

eagle_A40

Rank VI
Member
Supporter

Influencer I

3,128
Prairieville, Louisiana
First Name
Michael
Last Name
*
Member #

19666

I carry a Hi-Lift Jack. I have almost 50 + years of experience using this type of lifting mechanism(Farming and Industrial). You need to be very careful when utilizing one.

Before using, ask yourself:
"What is the worst that can happen while using it? "
"How can I mitigate the possibility of lose to myself, others around me and the vehicle itself?"

Follow the procedures that you come up with while using the jack.

Also see, Imminent Threat Solutions

I also carry wheel chocks and a bottle jack.
 

Sasquatch SC

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

3,326
Spartanburg, SC, USA
First Name
Trey
Last Name
Hayes
Member #

17253

The ARB BushRanger X-Jack is legitimately the best piece of recovery gear I have and is also the most versatile jack I have ever had. I have used the Hi-Lift style jacks before for changing out a tractor tire and they are sketchy at the best of times. Bottle jacks can also be pretty sketchy. The X-Jack can literally be pushed up under whatever with only an inch of space available and will lift 8k+ lbs up 30" using the fumes from your exhaust if you only have a single pipe or with a compressor if you have dual pipes. It doesn't take up much space since it deflates back flat so it isn't hard to find a spot for in your rig. I've used my x-jack from everything from taking the wheels off to lifting out of a bog to get traction boards under the tires. Since the bag conforms to the vehicle as it inflates, you don't have to worry as much about being dead on to a lift point. I threw a set of folding wheel chocks I got from Amazon into the carry bag just in case they are needed.
 
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JimBill

Rank IV
Member

Enthusiast II

1,356
Tres Pinos, CA
First Name
James
Last Name
Madison
Member #

18747

Yes and No!

Yes: A Hi-lift sits mounted to the front bumper on the 76 Cherokee, mostly to add weight to help overcome the 3 leaf ROUGH Country springs, and the garage is too full of crap anyhow so it is a nice out of sight, out of mind storage spot. It also looks intimidating in the rear view mirror of the driver in front of me when he/she is going under the speed limit or cuts me off in traffic. The Cherokee is mostly in retirement now, occasionally making a county dump or parts store run.

No: I carry a 6 ton bottle jack kit and stock jack in my current overlander - 03 WJ. Don't want the weight and there is little to hook a Hi-Lift to with the WJ plastic wrap around bumpers. Besides, on adventure far from home I am not solo, someone in the group always has one. And on the highway, AAA is always a lazy phone call away.
 
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RainGoat

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,011
Kirkland, WA
Member #

6791

The ARB BushRanger X-Jack is legitimately the best piece of recovery gear I have and is also the most versatile jack I have ever had.
Good to hear! I’ve owned one for 16 years but never used it - primarily because I find it’s packed size a huge PITA to pack in a small-mid sized SUV. I’ve been thinking about making a small deck where I could slide it, my privacy tent & my Tiregater underneath everything.
 
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Sasquatch SC

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

3,326
Spartanburg, SC, USA
First Name
Trey
Last Name
Hayes
Member #

17253

Good to hear! I’ve owned one for 16 years but never used it - primarily because I find it’s packed size a huge PITA to pack in a small-mid sized SUV. I’ve been thinking about making a small deck where I could slide it, my privacy tent & my Tiregater underneath everything.
I don't use the bag that originally came with it, I put mine in an old gym bag. My overland rig is a 2019 Subaru Outback so it is smaller than pretty much everything else. My space is even more limited because I have to keep my backseat open for my 90+ lbs Doberman co-pilot. I have a Wilco Hitchgate so I can carry a full-size spare and also because the temporary spare & kit that came with the car was useless once I lifted and went to the bigger tires. Getting rid of that stuff gave me the benefit of a pretty big cavity beneath the rear floorboard. I can fit the x-jack, air compressor, some basic tools, tow rope, jumpstarter box thingy, and some extra tie downs in that space. I'm looking at getting some Front Runner boxes soon to transfer some of that stuff onto the roof because I will soon hopefully be filling that space with some AGM deep cycle batteries to power a fridge.
 
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systemdelete

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

I carried a hi-lift for years on my ‘74 bronco, and used it often. Now I’m older, in a different shape(round) and have no business being on the working end of a hi-lift. I’ve gone towards more stock rigs, that use more stock style jacks.

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