Hi-Lift: How many people NOT running them?

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Are you running a Hi-Lift?

  • Yes

    Votes: 57 42.9%
  • No

    Votes: 69 51.9%
  • Yes but all for looks and/or extra piece of mind

    Votes: 7 5.3%

  • Total voters
    133

KSTrekker

Rank IV
Member

Advocate III

1,097
Lenexa, KS
Member #

9644

@KSTrekker

Do you have sliders? I ask because I’ve been working w Safe Jack to figure out the best way to lift the LR3/4s using their jack. I have sliders (not my truck in the pic) and it makes a world of difference as there are multiple areas for the jack and stand to make contact. Without sliders it gets tricky. And yes, without a way to hold the truck while you add pieces to the Safe Jack, the jack won’t lift the truck high enough to work. It’s not as easy as one would think to find a good location for the jack and stand under these trucks. I haven’t found a good solution yet. I can make it work on trucks without sliders but not in a way that your average owner (aka mall crawlers) would use it.

Chris
I plan on adding sliders, not only for the side and bottom protection, but to add jack points (pretty much why I don't carry a Hi-Lift now).
 
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Lindenwood

Rank V
Member

Advocate II

2,522
Ft Walton Beach, Fl
First Name
Jacob
Last Name
McDonald
Member #

2636

Even with sliders, lifting from the wheel is much safer as it not only eliminates risk of the jack nose slipping, but pretty much guarantees the jack wont hit the vehicle.

My hydraulic jack actually broke a while ago, but since then I have used my Lift-Mate to jack up three separate vehicles for routine maintenance, placing jackstands under the vehicle once lifted. Havent even bothered replacing the broken trolley jack. 91OGqTRe-xL._SL1500_.jpg
 
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justjames

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,836
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Member #

9429

I'll add a little to the history side. I grew up at a farm country repair shop. Every farm had at least one jack if not more. In those days, we called them Handy-Man Jacks. I'm not sure if they became Hi-Lift or if there was some other transition.

They were used for all the obvious lifting of trucks, tractors, trailers, etc. They were also used to stretch fence wire in the same manner we use them today for winching. Around the shop they were used to clamp things to be welded or spread things needing repair. Since most serious farm equipment repairs involved welding, I've see them occasionally welded to a truck frame then the repair finished while the jack held things in place. Then the jack was cut off to be used again. Obviously, this practice would not pass muster with today's metallurgists.
 
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DK_XV

Rank V
Member

Traveler I

2,007
Easton, WA
Member #

6936

I just placed my order for one and some rock sliders.

Attended the NW overland rally where that had a clinic on how to use that high lift, lift mate, and winch kit to jack up, cast and winch your truck. It was really great to take that and get some hands on time with trained professionals on how to use it.

I had it on my list of things to get, but I didn't want to get one and have no idea how to use it safely. I missed part two of the session due to some trail rides, but also got some traction boards to assist further. Will feel a little more confident to try things and be able to self recovery out of them now.

@DK_XV | PNW | '17 Colorado Diesel
 
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bendts

Rank III
Member

Advocate I

576
A Pasture in Wisconsin
First Name
Bendt
Last Name
S
Member #

13509

Ham Callsign
N0WTR
I have one - Its mounted to my roof rack - Takes up no room for other gear. If I need it, it's there. If I don't, its there till I (or someone else) needs it. Its a tool just like everything else you carry "Just in case".
 

Kyle & Kari Frink

Rank VI
Member

Advocate III

3,689
San Diego, California
Member #

6376

@SAC-CA-Runner

It's as you said there will be that one time when you will need it and you'll wish you had it lol.
The only advice that I can give is:
  1. There are already a lot of great comments listed above on pros/cons/peoples opinions.
  2. There are a couple attachments for the Hi-lift that I think are money.
    • The first one being is a piece that basically turns the Hi-Lift into a manual "Jaws of Life", it can be used to pry open doors and act as a spreader. Lets be honest if someone rolls their vehicle, something bad escalates quickly such as a fire, and this does happen. They can't get out because for whatever reason the only exit is smashed i.e. (door/window). This tool would literally save the day, now granted this is all hypothetical. But still nether the less it would come in handy in such situation, cause you never know.
    • The other attachment would be to turn the Hi-lift into a "come-along", because lets say either your winch gets broken, or you forgot the controller, or you forgot your bubba rope, your maxtraxs for some crazy reason are not getting the job done. I could go on and on because stuff breaks and we all forget stuff. But the come-along versatility of the Hi-Lift could be what gets you unstuck.
  3. It can also be used to clamp/hold stuff together for repairs. I have personally never used it for such an occasion but could see how it could work depending on the situation.
  4. @Lifestyle Overland The last reason I have is a demonstration shown by Kevin from Lifestyle Overland using it in a choke point to "scoot" his Turtleback trailer over in a series of lifts to be able to make it through the tight squeeze. He has an amazing video showing just that! You could potentially do the same with a vehicle in such a bind. He also explains you should know/have experience with what you are doing before attempting lol. The video is on his YouTube page Lifestyle Overland, its the one of his family and friends venturing out to Anza Borrego Desert.
I personally have never had any problems with our Hi-Lift.
I have used it numerous times for different reasons, and think it works just fine for how it was intended and designed to be used.
I think a big thing most people don't think about is the one time you do have to change a tire, and your in a spot out on a trail/rock crawling. Where accessing the axle or body/frame to lift the vehicle up to change out the tire isn't possible due to the terrain. That is where the Hi-Lift has the advantage, depending on if you have good lift points i.e. (rock sliders, steel bumpers, a tow point with a D-link) you would be able to get the vehicle up.
 

ohiowrangler

Rank V
Member
Supporter

Pathfinder I

2,055
Newark, Oh
Member #

3644

I started carrying mine on the hood, but then I couldn't put my windshield frame down(my favorite way to ride). I used it twice on a trail ride. Then I left it in the shed, till I could have used it, instead of my winch. I have since had an IDEA, yes an idea, that does surprise some of my friends. I designed a mount for my swing out tire carrier. So the moral of the story is, I am now carrying my HI-LIFT again. Can I get along without it, Yes. Does it now take up enough space to leave it home, No. Just my input, Ron.
 

Lost-Again

Rank V
Member

Contributor III

1,402
Texas
Member #

13072

Ham Callsign
KG5FXD
I've had one ever since my old CJ7 days. I'll use the analogy of power saws. Potentially dangerous and scares the hell out of me. So, every time I use them I respect that danger and treat them accordingly.
 

Brayden keller

Rank IV
Member

Influencer III

808
Virginia
Member #

12413

I’m new to wheeling and don’t even know if the high point would work on my 4Runner, I have sock bumpers and the stock running board but I am starting to build my recovery gear, any other “essentials” people have used and would recommend?
 

Lindenwood

Rank V
Member

Advocate II

2,522
Ft Walton Beach, Fl
First Name
Jacob
Last Name
McDonald
Member #

2636

I’m new to wheeling and don’t even know if the high point would work on my 4Runner, I have sock bumpers and the stock running board but I am starting to build my recovery gear, any other “essentials” people have used and would recommend?
...See above post
Even with sliders, lifting from the wheel is much safer as it not only eliminates risk of the jack nose slipping, but pretty much guarantees the jack wont hit the vehicle.

My hydraulic jack actually broke a while ago, but since then I have used my Lift-Mate to jack up three separate vehicles for routine maintenance, placing jackstands under the vehicle once lifted. Havent even bothered replacing the broken trolley jack. View attachment 54714
I have armor on all 4 sides and will never lift from anything but the lift-mate except if I needed to cast my rig sideways out of deep ruts.
 

Nickzero

Rank VI
Benefactor
Member

Advocate II

3,984
Sanford Florida
Member #

12727

There are many uses for the Hi-Lift farm jack when stuck out in the middle of nowhere alone. It can be used in conjunction with a few feet of chain and a hooked strap to manually winch yourself out of a sticky situation. Thats if your rig doesn't have a winch. It can also jack up your lifted rig on the beach with the use of a wooden flat bored.
 

Boostpowered

Rank VI
Member

Pathfinder II

2,913
Wolfe City, TX, USA
First Name
Justin
Last Name
Davis
Member #

14684

I mainly use my hi lift jack on the farm to lift my tactor, i have used it once on the trail as a winch. Im very cautious when using hi lifts i watched a farmer get his teeth knocked out by the handle when it didnt fully seat and let loose
 

DieselPilot

Rank I
Member

Traveler I

271
Georgia and Florida
Member #

6521

No I only use a large bottle jack. Truck is just to tall and dangerous to use a hi lift on. Much less I don’t have any real good jacking points for one.