Fake Overlanding?

  • Hi Guest, you may choose a LIGHT or DARK theme that works best for you with the "Style Chooser" button at the bottom left on this page!

MidOH

Rank V

Traveler III

1,268
Mid Ohio
First Name
John
Last Name
Clark
Ham Callsign
YourHighness
Someone took a pic of their truck on a flat dirt road?

Well yeah, 90% of Overlanding in the US is easy dirt roads and pavement. Still doesn't make anything less useful. I can take my Mustang to a hotel in Keywest, but I'd rather take my truck and ground tent to a campground there. A large portion of this hobby is just car camping.

Those pics of the LR competitions in Africa........... That's just the 1% highlight reel. The rest of the time they're on flat dirt roads, same as us.
 

DoggMan1163

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Big Sandy, TX, USA
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Beard
Member #

17899

I remember in my younger days I used whatever vehicle I had and went a lot of places that 4 wheel drive vehicles were going most of them thought I was nuts yes I did get into some bad situations and got stuck a few times but with Jack's and a come- along always managed to get out but the main thing is that I had a good time made alot of friends along the way
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lanlubber and Road

Nick_Gomez81

Rank I
Member

Traveler I

233
Land O' Lakes, FL, USA
First Name
Nick
Last Name
Gomez
Member #

16702

I think its easy to get caught up in labels like “overlanding” and what-not. I have access to property in New Mexico and Tennessee that my family and I visit regularly. We like to make a road trip out if it and hit trails when in these places. I have a Jeep with a rack and a rooftop tent. I mostly travel without any other support vehicles so I have a winch and recovery gear. The rooftop tent makes it comfortable to camp without worrying about mud in TN or rocks in NM. For me and my family we just call it camping. I love the “Overlanding” community and its support along the journey. Don’t get caught up in labels.
 

DrivingTacoLoco

Rank V
Member

Contributor II

1,798
2418 Jefferson Ave, Winston-Salem, NC, USA
First Name
Rich
Last Name
Weiss
Member #

19056

Vehicles are tools. The better and more capable the tool the more you can do with it more efficiently. We may not always have the need for all the capability of the tool but when you do you are glad you have it. I buy a tool based on what I think I will need and I can afford. I bought a 2010 Tacoma because It was the best I felt I could get for my needs and the money I was willing to spend. As I earn more money I put more into upgrades because it's my hobby. Not to show off but for my personal satisfaction.

While I may think someone else who spent more to actually do less isn't right for me, I don't look down upon them or accuse them of being posers.

$20K for audio gear isn't right for me but it is where you choose to spend your hard earned dollars is not for me to question. I'm happy for you that it provides satisfaction to you.

What's important is the music not the gear. For many of us "Overlanders" it's not about the rig it's about the adventure or getting out in nature, or 100 other things that provide personal satisfaction. If setting up the rig is part of that then fantastic! It certainly gives me satisfaction to build out my rig.

I have trips in the planning stages but I could be hit by a bus tomorrow. If I never get to do my long adventures I will die happy knowing I enjoyed seeking (not acheiving) adventure and getting satisfaction and happiness in the process.

Why do you care what I call my activities? Why would I care what you think? I don't do it for you or to impress anyone but myself.

All of this discussion says more about you than it does about us.

You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.

William J. H. Boetcker
 

Lanlubber

Rank V
Member

Traveler III

2,327
Mimbres, NM, USA
Member #

16986

Ham Callsign
none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
Yes, but sometimes arguing just for the sake of the argument is fun! :tonguewink:
And yes it is a valet argument we are having, if you make a statement like "I'm an overlander" you better be prepared to explain what it is. Because in this case, the word overlanding has a history, a history of self-reliant, long distance travelling over land to remote locations. And if you use the word “overlanding” in a way those 4 ingredients are not present it is logical you get these questions.

In my opinion, this discussion is not about the OB principles, it is about the actual word Overlanding and what it means. The OB principals do not describe overlanding. I'm 100% behind the OB principals, but I’m not an overlander, I’m a camper and so is 99% of the rest here in the forum. We (or you because I’m not) only want to call it overlanding because than you have an excuse to buy expensive stuff you don't need but is really cool and you really really want because you want to display a certain lifestyle to the world.

In my definition a few post above, I mentioned crossing borders. This is because I'm European, I totally agree that you can "overland" in the US or in AUS without crossing borders.
I also mention time (months, years). This for me is a critical part of the definition. If you don't ad time in the definition, every person who drives to a campsite for the weekend is an overlander?
It would be the same as calling every person who ever read a book about a topic an "expert". Yes, we all would want to be, but face it, we are NOT.

The same goes for overlanding, we all want to be overlanders, but most of us don't have the time or the means to do it. But since overlanding sells, on FB, Instagram and Youtube, we fake our way through by making up a new definition so we can call ourselves an overlander!

This is not a negative post by any means, but it seems that there are some people here that find it terrifying that not all members think exactly the same as they do. And of course in this case don't want to be exposed.
I love OB and the OB principals and yes overlanding sounds way more sexy than car camping.

So let’s all agree not to agree on the meaning of the word “overlanding”. Get out there, start a campfire and meet people. It is way more fun having this discussion around the campfire with friends instead of here on the forum.

Outfit ,Explore, Connect
Personally I don't buy anything to "show off", as you seem to think people do (some may but not the majority) ! I don't know how many people use facebook or instagram or any other source of social media, why should you care ? I don't use any and I'm sure many others don't either. Again, it sounds like your just jealous of "THINGS" other people have that you do not have.
I buy what equipment I think I need to go wherever I "might" want to go. Distance has nothing to do with overlanding as long as I have a destination, I am overlanding. How hard it is to get there and back has nothing to do with describing overland either. I don't necessarily go to camp specifically, but on the way to where I'm going, depending on distance, I will boondock camp to save money and to enjoy that lifestyle in an disbursed manner. I agree that if you go somewhere and you never get "off road" that is not overlanding, it is traveling.
You seem to be putting everyone in the same category into which you fit yourself. Who cares how often or how many times a year one goes overlanding ? Because the guy next to me has a camp trailer, 4x4, winches and retrieval equipment, solar, 12v refer, and other equipment is his or her business and makes them no more or no less an overlander than myself.
There is no specific definition of overlanding, so why are you trying to define it into a specific category for which there is none. As a matter of fact I personally never use the word overland to describe where I plan to go. I only use the word overland in this forum because this is the OB forum. Otherwise I'm just going boondocking, whatever that entails, and with whatever piece of equipment I feel I need to do it. Neither word is glorious and dosent need to be.
Lastly, I don't fake anything ! I don't think others fake anything either, I could be mistaken by some. I think you could have used the word "pretentious" to describe "some" but you don't need to be throwing everyone except yourself into some category that is demeaning because they have and you have not.
Lanlubber
 

Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
Dude
Member #

6589

Personally I don't buy anything to "show off", as you seem to think people do (some may but not the majority) ! I don't know how many people use facebook or instagram or any other source of social media, why should you care ? I don't use any and I'm sure many others don't either. Again, it sounds like your just jealous of "THINGS" other people have that you do not have.
I buy what equipment I think I need to go wherever I "might" want to go. Distance has nothing to do with overlanding as long as I have a destination, I am overlanding. How hard it is to get there and back has nothing to do with describing overland either. I don't necessarily go to camp specifically, but on the way to where I'm going, depending on distance, I will boondock camp to save money and to enjoy that lifestyle in an disbursed manner. I agree that if you go somewhere and you never get "off road" that is not overlanding, it is traveling.
You seem to be putting everyone in the same category into which you fit yourself. Who cares how often or how many times a year one goes overlanding ? Because the guy next to me has a camp trailer, 4x4, winches and retrieval equipment, solar, 12v refer, and other equipment is his or her business and makes them no more or no less an overlander than myself.
There is no specific definition of overlanding, so why are you trying to define it into a specific category for which there is none. As a matter of fact I personally never use the word overland to describe where I plan to go. I only use the word overland in this forum because this is the OB forum. Otherwise I'm just going boondocking, whatever that entails, and with whatever piece of equipment I feel I need to do it. Neither word is glorious and dosent need to be.
Lastly, I don't fake anything ! I don't think others fake anything either, I could be mistaken by some. I think you could have used the word "pretentious" to describe "some" but you don't need to be throwing everyone except yourself into some category that is demeaning because they have and you have not.
Lanlubber
You may be barking at the wrong guy, Jim, as you basically agree with most of his points. From here seems like you're more at odds with the original poster...

I agree completely with @GeoCampers #4771 recent response and don't think he is trying to define or put everyone into a specific category at all, nor is he being demeaning or negative in any way I can see. It is simply his point of view based on his own experience.

I think--judging from my own experience and how my mind has changed a lot about 'things', gear or types of vehicles needed, cost involved and all the other crap y'all are getting so wound up about--that once folks actually get out there and put a bunch of miles under your wheels and bunch of time under your belt, you may see and feel differently than just imagining how something or another should be done or what it should be called.

And, to those thinking this discussion is beating a dead horse or "oh god not another of these threads" it is obviously a point folks are trying to figure out how they feel and where they stand.

*As long as this is dialogue and civil, not debate and angry like so much of the world has been conditioned to be, then it is constructive and positive.*

People need a place to air what they feel, and to feel out others as to what they think. When it is civil discourse (all have a right to their opinion and I'd like to hear yours), not angry debate (i'm right you're wrong and i'm gonna prove you're wrong), then oftentimes a greater knowledge emerges.

That's good for everyone.



 

Lanlubber

Rank V
Member

Traveler III

2,327
Mimbres, NM, USA
Member #

16986

Ham Callsign
none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
Webster's NW Dictionary defines O'ver-land as - - - "by, on, or ACROSS land".. If this is what you do you are "Overlanding".
It does not call camping, fishing, hunting, overlanding. Although you may have to overland to do any of these things and others. There is nothing "FAKE" about overlanding. The word "Fake" is defined as, "to make something seem real, by deception, a fraud, counterfeit, sham or false". This should end this debate, it should disprove any thought of someone being a fake if they are out there anywhere that is not home, though you may have to "overland" to get home !! :tearsofjoy:
 

stoney126

Rank VI
Founder 500
Member
Supporter

Influencer II

3,278
Secret lair.
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Stoner
Member #

0408

Let's keep it civil, Inserts passive aggressive comment. Hahahaha . Since I'm the "those people" I'll respond . There is so much info here and in the core principals noted that if they were actually here to find out where he or she stands, the debates, arguments , pros and cons, budget no budget builds etc etc etc.. are here documented and some closed because it always goes down the same path.

These posts are to start shit plain and simple. If I'm off base then I apologize but I mean come on. Common sense answers the question do you need a 80k dollar veh. to drive on straight line dirt road . Obviously you do not and to start a thread about is not seeking knowledge , it can be to share you opinion but its ine that has been beaten to death . But Of course this is the internet and things get misinterpreted all the time.

So much time and energy wasted in what the next guy or gal is doing. Take that time and plan your next trip or how your going find what type of food to bring, should I bring the dog? This thing we do is about fun and enjoying the short time we have, dont waste it worring about trival nonsense . You dont get that time back.

*This isnt meant to sound angry or hostil
 

Lanlubber

Rank V
Member

Traveler III

2,327
Mimbres, NM, USA
Member #

16986

Ham Callsign
none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
Let's keep it civil, Inserts passive aggressive comment. Hahahaha . Since I'm the "those people" I'll respond . There is so much info here and in the core principals noted that if they were actually here to find out where he or she stands, the debates, arguments , pros and cons, budget no budget builds etc etc etc.. are here documented and some closed because it always goes down the same path.

These posts are to start shit plain and simple. If I'm off base then I apologize but I mean come on. Common sense answers the question do you need a 80k dollar veh. to drive on straight line dirt road . Obviously you do not and to start a thread about is not seeking knowledge , it can be to share you opinion but its ine that has been beaten to death . But Of course this is the internet and things get misinterpreted all the time.

So much time and energy wasted in what the next guy or gal is doing. Take that time and plan your next trip or how your going find what type of food to bring, should I bring the dog? This thing we do is about fun and enjoying the short time we have, dont waste it worring about trival nonsense . You dont get that time back.

*This isnt meant to sound angry or hostil
Thank you, I feel the same and I am a newbie too OB. I have gained a wealth of info from many of it's members and all is appreciated immensely !
 

Steve

lost again...
Founder 500
Member

Experimenter I

3,719
Lorain County, OH, USA
First Name
Steve
Last Name
.
Member #

202

Wow. The fact that you can off-road just fine in a van that looks like it has some minor suspension and wheel upgrades does put a different light on things.
That's the whole principal behind this forum. It isn't about what you drive, or how much you spend. Click on Road's links, and note that he lives in that setup nearly full time, and has adventured more so far this year in the SW deserts, Texas beaches, southern back bayous, and NE woods than most folks do in a lifetime. All the while, meeting interesting folks, soaking in (and becoming part of) the local culture, and teaching us vicariously through his stories.
 

Tim Roberts

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,441
Santa Clarita, CA USA
Member #

16810

Yes, but sometimes arguing just for the sake of the argument is fun! :tonguewink:
And yes it is a valet argument we are having, if you make a statement like "I'm an overlander" you better be prepared to explain what it is. Because in this case, the word overlanding has a history, a history of self-reliant, long distance travelling over land to remote locations. And if you use the word “overlanding” in a way those 4 ingredients are not present it is logical you get these questions.

In my opinion, this discussion is not about the OB principles, it is about the actual word Overlanding and what it means. The OB principals do not describe overlanding. I'm 100% behind the OB principals, but I’m not an overlander, I’m a camper and so is 99% of the rest here in the forum. We (or you because I’m not) only want to call it overlanding because than you have an excuse to buy expensive stuff you don't need but is really cool and you really really want because you want to display a certain lifestyle to the world.

In my definition a few post above, I mentioned crossing borders. This is because I'm European, I totally agree that you can "overland" in the US or in AUS without crossing borders.
I also mention time (months, years). This for me is a critical part of the definition. If you don't ad time in the definition, every person who drives to a campsite for the weekend is an overlander?
It would be the same as calling every person who ever read a book about a topic an "expert". Yes, we all would want to be, but face it, we are NOT.

The same goes for overlanding, we all want to be overlanders, but most of us don't have the time or the means to do it. But since overlanding sells, on FB, Instagram and Youtube, we fake our way through by making up a new definition so we can call ourselves an overlander!

This is not a negative post by any means, but it seems that there are some people here that find it terrifying that not all members think exactly the same as they do. And of course in this case don't want to be exposed.
I love OB and the OB principals and yes overlanding sounds way more sexy than car camping.

So let’s all agree not to agree on the meaning of the word “overlanding”. Get out there, start a campfire and meet people. It is way more fun having this discussion around the campfire with friends instead of here on the forum.

Outfit ,Explore, Connect
Wow, arguing for the sake of arguing. It’s an interesting way to converse with others. Enjoy your camping and have a nice day!
 
  • Like
Reactions: DoggMan1163

grubworm

Rank V

Pathfinder I

1,685
Louisiana, USA
First Name
mike
Last Name
c
Member #

17464

These posts are to start shit plain and simple.
Ha! That is very true and these type of threads do get a lot of interaction. I posted a thread about a solar set up I did for my tear-drop and was hoping to get some additional input and I got crickets. I also posted a thread in my regional area asking about camp spots on the Buffalo River...over 100 views and ZERO replies...plus I see a good bit of legit questions asked with no replies...BUT threads like this and the ones about Overlanding being elitiist, etc. do get the responses. It doesn't take long to see a pattern. And yes, there are good threads like the one about 12v refridgerators that are good threads and helpful and informative with lots of interaction, but they are hit and miss on what people will respond to. Stirring shit is a guarantee to get interaction...hell, I'm on this thread! Why? Because that is where the action is. I'm guilty for even feeding into these threads, but there are some great posts that come out of it and I do see some great philosophies that might just help restore my faith in mankind. Sure a lot of threads stir shit, but they also seem to bring some people closer together as well. It's people...we're all defunct in some form or fashion I guess, so I just go along with it until someone replies to my post about camping on the Buffalo River.... :)
 
Last edited:

stoney126

Rank VI
Founder 500
Member
Supporter

Influencer II

3,278
Secret lair.
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Stoner
Member #

0408

Ha! That is very true and these type of threads do get a lot of interaction. I posted a thread about a solar set up I did for my tear-drop and was hoping to get some additional input and I got crickets. I also posted a thread in my regional area asking about camp spots on the Buffalo River...over 100 views and ZERO replies...plus I see a good bit of legit questions asked with no replies...BUT threads like this and the ones about Overlanding being elitiist, etc. do get the responses. It doesn't take long to see a pattern. And yes, there are good threads like the one about 12v refridgerators that are good threads and helpful and informative with lots of interaction, but they are hit and miss on what people will respond to. Stirring shit is a guarantee to get interaction...hell, I'm on this thread! Why? Because that is where the action is. I'm guilty for even feeding into these threads, but there are some great posts that come out of it and I do see some great philosophies that might just help restore my faith in mankind. Sure a lot of threads stir shit, but they also seem to bring some people closer together as well. It's people...we're all defunct in some form or fashion I guess, so I just go along with it until someone replies to my post about camping on the Buffalo River.... :)
Dammit know I gotta look for you post on buffalo river. Hahaha
 

trikebubble

Rank V
Member

Advocate I

2,522
Penticton, BC
Member #

1969

Someone took a pic of their truck on a flat dirt road?

Well yeah, 90% of Overlanding in the US is easy dirt roads and pavement. Still doesn't make anything less useful. I can take my Mustang to a hotel in Keywest, but I'd rather take my truck and ground tent to a campground there. A large portion of this hobby is just car camping.

Those pics of the LR competitions in Africa........... That's just the 1% highlight reel. The rest of the time they're on flat dirt roads, same as us.

Truck on a flat dirt road? I resemble that remark....



37388588_10155380564181637_561246547916881920_o.jpg
 

Berkshire Overland

Rank I
Member

Contributor I

233
552 Riverton Road, Riverton, Connecticut, USA
First Name
Jason
Last Name
Fuller
Member #

18767

In this day and age where almost every sqft. of land is owned, preserved and or managed with road or two tracks connecting it all there is a lot of nostalgia for the past. Wagon trains, John Hanning Speke, Roald Amundsen, Camel Trophy.... alas I am totally fine with weekend on some less travel roads, in place I haven't seen and and maybe a country store with great food. As long as your out in the real world enjoying nature it a good day, You get my meaning!
 

adventure_is_necessary

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

3,626
Emporia, KS
Member #

7082

Watch:

Jason explains his view of Overlanding and an overland rig well.

My $0.02 is find a rig that can do what you want to do, regardless of what it is. Then find it's limits and things you'd like out of it, then modify. I drive a 2004 Jeep WJ with a short lift and 31" tires. This is plenty to do what I want and more. It handles well both on and off-road, and I can rely on it. It is old and had been beat on, but I trust it. I spend the $$ to keep it reliable and spend $$ on mods that make sense to me and my driving style. It doesn't matter what you drive or where you drive (within reason [Tread Lightly]), but it's more about the adventure along the way and sometimes the destination.
 

Billiebob

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,760
Nakusp, BC V0G 1R0, Canada
First Name
Bill
Last Name
Tobey
Member #

18893

The better and more capable the tool the more you can do with it more efficiently.
So well said until "efficiently"
Plus "better, more capable"

The factory be it Jeep or Toyota or Land rover have way bigger Research & Development budgets than any Aftermarket Parts Seller. Matter of fact, almost every aftermarket part you bolt on creates stress, weakness on some other part, leading to more mods $$$$$ causing something else to break.

All fine for wheeling guys who get together for epic rides and carry enough tools and parts to build a new vehicle but if you are overlanding? Travelling far from help and civilization. The last thing to do is modify anything and create a weak link.

The past 5 years I have been removing the lift, stepping down in tire size, returning to the stock spec Jeep built it to to get that "Trail Rated" badge. And liking it more every day.

Personally, stock is better and more capable than modified.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DoggMan1163