Fake Overlanding?

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Tim Roberts

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I think it is hard to define an exact terrain for overlanding. While it is certainly off the beaten path the path is not always beat up. In my personal experience I have done a lot of smooth trails both sandy and very muddy needing 4x4, tracks with ruts, grooves, rocks and steep inclines and up hill runs without 4x4. I have also been in the desert running for 50 miles at speeds of 60 mph... When I was in Moab for a few months I did all sorts of trails some were at a snails pace others I had fun spinning tires and sliding through turns.

Camping for me is certainly a part of it. With out group we have done over a 100 miles off road and I am pretty sure a corolla would not have made all of it but, maybe some parts.. My camping might be in a tent or the back of my 2 seater Tahoe or even just under the stars on the ground.

My guess is many of those videos are taken in areas with smoother trails or maybe they are like my wife and I when get into the rough sections we are often to busy hanging on to video it and we seldom if ever get out to video the action.

Either way I think overlanding can be varied in many ways terrain, vehicles, tents or lack of tents, distance or number of days.

I would also point out jeeps are not the average overland vehicles too.
Well said! I think another great way to explain Overlanding is to read the Overland Bound Core Principles. To me it means it’s a little bit of everything! You can be at one end or the other! Just get out and enjoy!
 
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MDBIGHORN

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Wow. The fact that you can off-road just fine in a van that looks like it has some minor suspension and wheel upgrades does put a different light on things. It's just that, why is this forum filled with highly upgraded Jeeps and other common off-roading type vehicles? A serious lift kit + suspension and wheel upgrades is a lot of money, why are there so many people doing this? I've seen pre-built "overland" Jeeps for $80-100k. Why on Earth would anyone spend that kind of $ on a Jeep when they could be overlanding just fine on pennies in comparison? Am I missing something?
I'm divorced on a shoestring budget I have a ram 1500 STOCK with a cap that I paid $200( cap not truck) for so I can throw my stuff in the back and take my 4 year old out and do something fun if its a kayak, fishing or just camping now days kids need things other than the internet and bad news on tv. Its quality time I'll never forget times with my family being outdoors or just together. Family and friends come first not a truck. Don't try to pee in my Cheerios salty pants.
 

Correus

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Hi, I'm new here but I'm curious about the overlanding I see on many youtube channels. It seems to me that what they're doing is going on flat, very well-worn offroad trails which look like a Corolla could cross them let alone a lifted Jeep. Also I see them crawling along, so I wonder if they might as well be driving Corollas. I had this idea of overlanding being something like long-range off-roading, or off-roading with camping mixed in. Off-roading to me meant crossing a terrain you couldn't in a regular commuter vehicle. Do I have an incorrect concept of overlanding or is what these guys are doing amounts to pretend overlanding?
Google "First Overland London-Singapore by Land Rover". Tons of info about this journey - this is true "overlanding".

Read the following article - this is true "overlanding".


Read the following article and research "Barbara Toy" - this is true "overlanding".


And I could share a lot more.

One thing to note - none of these people had all the fancy shmancy toys and gadgets people feel they MUST have today. And before anyone says "but those trips took place before we had all of these toys and gadgets" - not true, the Hylands' trip was in 2015/2016.

And now they are about to recreate the "First Overland" trip using SI Land Rovers and no fancy shmancy toys and gadgets to the extent so many do today.
 

LonestarXV

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Wow. The fact that you can off-road just fine in a van that looks like it has some minor suspension and wheel upgrades does put a different light on things. It's just that, why is this forum filled with highly upgraded Jeeps and other common off-roading type vehicles? A serious lift kit + suspension and wheel upgrades is a lot of money, why are there so many people doing this? I've seen pre-built "overland" Jeeps for $80-100k. Why on Earth would anyone spend that kind of $ on a Jeep when they could be overlanding just fine on pennies in comparison? Am I missing something?
Personal preference and situations, like many things in life everyone has their own preferences. I've seen cars off-roaded in harsh climents in third world countries doing things off-road that would be considered recreation here. I've also seen people with "built" Jeeps that will never leave the pavement because it's all about the look. I really like the practical daily nature of my Subaru Crosstrek and while you won't catch me on any rock crawler trails it's more than capable to get out and explore and more so than a lot of SUVs and trucks too. I also have a 95 toyota 4runner that was my daily driver until it wasn't able to fulfill those duties due to stuff breaking too often. When I got that 4runner I was not in a position to buy a vehicle over $5k and as such I got the best I could with my budget. My point is it doesn't matter what you drive it's what you do with it, not meaning go hit a 3 diamond trail with a brand new Honda Civic, but do find what works for you and your wants/ needs and don't sweat what others have found fits them.
 

MDBIGHORN

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I replied to a post a minute ago but this is more what I was trying to get to. In Texas when I was a kid it wasn't overlanding if we went camping for two weeks we just hopped in our suburban and went camping no phones no gps a map and a compass. I may not get far enough of the beaten path all the time but we still enjoy ourselves. Now its three generations. 20190713_180639_HDR.jpg2019-08-17 22.14.10.jpg20190727_130301_HDR.jpg20190712_203907_HDR.jpg
 

Charles M

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By most dictionaries on line it is pretty simple and wide open to interpretation as are the rigs and people on this forum...

Overlander is "One who travels over land '

So I guess sailing or on a boat does not count... lol

This forum keeps it pretty simple the same as most dictionaries. How one goes about it is entirely up to them and should not be criticized or defined by someone else. We are all free to travel over land in our own method... 200 years ago an overlander was walking, in a wagon or maybe on a horse or yak or ????

Some people keep it simple, some go way over board and some like myself just enjoy spending time building a cool rig that hopefully is prepared for when I actually do get time to go travel... I wish I could spend a year on the road in other countries but, I do have to make a living... Although I have been fortunate enough to put 30,000 miles on my rig in the last two years..

Let's not get hung up on definitions but, instead spend what time we have getting out and traveling over land...
 
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Kipp

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Hi, I'm new here but I'm curious about the overlanding I see on many youtube channels. It seems to me that what they're doing is going on flat, very well-worn offroad trails which look like a Corolla could cross them let alone a lifted Jeep. Also I see them crawling along, so I wonder if they might as well be driving Corollas. I had this idea of overlanding being something like long-range off-roading, or off-roading with camping mixed in. Off-roading to me meant crossing a terrain you couldn't in a regular commuter vehicle. Do I have an incorrect concept of overlanding or is what these guys are doing amounts to pretend overlanding?
All this reminds me of old martial arts movie " Mine is the one true Kung-fu" and then they fight.. There is too much discussion about what is true overlanding. There is so much to explore and have fun and I really don't get all these debates around "what is overlanding..."
 

AdventurousRover

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I think the perfect example is the Mongol rally. For me you can justify this as overlanding but you aren't even allowed with expensive rigs. If your rig surpasses a certain budget then you need to take along the amount in additional weight. This results in a lot of corrolas doing the trip thru areas where there even aren't any roads. Overlanding is all about the journey going from point A to B, not the tools that you bring along!
 

Boostpowered

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We all definately have different definitions of what overlanding is to each of us. Ive also noticed each of us have different definitions of offroad also if you have passenger cars pass you "off road" that is a sign that your not really off road, when im offroad there is no passing the trails are single track and that corolla would be stuck within 50 yards. Each of us lives in our own little world and experiences vary just like one mans trash is another mans treasure, one mans dirt road is another man off road trail.
 

Tim Roberts

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All this reminds me of old martial arts movie " Mine is the one true Kung-fu" and then they fight.. There is too much discussion about what is true overlanding. There is so much to explore and have fun and I really don't get all these debates around "what is overlanding..."
I guess it’s the need of some to debate everything? I prefer to go out and see this beautiful country and meet many of its wonderful people. Life is to short, get out and enjoy it! I do it in my truck off-roading and on pavement ( Overlanding )
 

lando50

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There is alot of bashing in this forum of the people that spend money on their rigs,i live in Miami Fl,my guest is that the bashing people would be complaining all the time about the people spending money in lambos,Ferrarys,and all kind of exotic cars,when a Corolla :grimacing:would do the same
 

Billiebob

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Overlanding is not how much money you spend or save. It is about the experience of leaving what you are comfortable with and challenging yourself culturally, emotionally, with food, new people, cultures, language. Heck most homeless people overland more than I do. Overlanding is also about being self sufficient, be that with $100K of equipment or a bicycle and a bit of cash. But if all you are doing is touring to see the sights, well you are touring.
 

Robert OB 33/48

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Overlanding is about exploration, rather than conquering obstacles. While the roads and trails we travel might be rough or technically challenging, they are the means to an end, not the goal itself. The goal is to see and learn about our world, whether on a weekend trip 100 miles from home or a 10,000-mile expedition across another continent.
Quote from Overland Journal.
We treasure the great outdoors, but also all the cultures of the world. We do have a politic opinion, but have respect for Religion, Political direction and Cultural rules, as long as they are non discriminating in any form.
But, for us, socializing, being together, helping eachother and travelling together is more important as politics, religion, etnical background, or gender.
We respect all people and their way of life, as long as they accept that we, in their eyes and way of life are different as well.
We respect the right of being in the Outdoors of everybody, and we hope they all respect our right as well.
Living together on this planet, is a must, not a privilege. Sharing this planet is a must, lets treasure this.
 

GeoCampers #4771

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So after a day well spend discussing this in the whatsapp group (yes, i had nothing better to do today). For me Overlanding is the following: "Overlanding is self-reliant overland travel to remote destinations where the journey is the principal goal. Typically, but not exclusively, it is accomplished with mechanized off-road capable transport (from bicycles to trucks) where the principal form of lodging is camping, often lasting for extended lengths of time (months to years) and spanning international boundaries."

That means, 99% of us are just campers, adventurous campers, but campers. That's what it was called for the past 100 years. The reason most of us like to call it overlanding is just to have an excuse to buy stuff you don't need but really really want. Compare it with for example tennis, 99% of the people playing tennis are just doing that, PLAYING tennis , only a small 1% (or less) are real tennis players. A portion of the 99% dreams of being a tennis player and is buying stuff they don't need but really want because Federer or Nadal has it.
The same goes for the outdoor enthusiasts. A small % are real Overlanders, the rest of us (me included) are dreaming of that lifestyle. and the stuff we buy is a reflection of that dream, and for some the closest we ever get to realise the dream. So if you feel better by calling what we do Overlanding, be my guest. But for me, I never use the word Overlanding or overlander, I’m not, I’m an adventurous traveller.
 

PapaDave

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Hi, I'm new here but I'm curious about the overlanding I see on many youtube channels. It seems to me that what they're doing is going on flat, very well-worn offroad trails which look like a Corolla could cross them let alone a lifted Jeep. Also I see them crawling along, so I wonder if they might as well be driving Corollas. I had this idea of overlanding being something like long-range off-roading, or off-roading with camping mixed in. Off-roading to me meant crossing a terrain you couldn't in a regular commuter vehicle. Do I have an incorrect concept of overlanding or is what these guys are doing amounts to pretend overlanding?
It’s a valid question. To me there’s 3 main components:

Off roading- looking for obstacles i.e. the Rubicon
Camping- staying put for a weekend in one spot
Overlanding- combo of the 2 with a new campsite each night

This was my campsite at 9500’ feet in the eastern Sierra’s, not too difficult to get up there, but the point was to get there via whatever road needed. :)

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