Fake Overlanding?

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Lanlubber

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I give this guy credit for tackling that trail with his RTT... I guess he's not fake
-TJ
No thanks, I'm not spending 30-$60,000 to crawl over a bunch of boulders just for kicks. I want peace and tranquility not heart attacks.
That's just rock crawling, which is a sport not overlanding per sae IMO.
 

tjZ06

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No thanks, I'm not spending 30-$60,000 to crawl over a bunch of boulders just for kicks. I want peace and tranquility not heart attacks.
That's just rock crawling, which is a sport not overlanding per sae IMO.
I was mostly making a joke/point that making arbitrary distinctions about what is/is not Overlanding based on the severity of the terrain somebody travels is just silly. I suppose you helped prove my point, the Original Poster was opining that just driving down a dirt-road that even a Corolla could drive isn't Overlanding because it's "too easy." Now you state the guy above isn't Overlanding because it's "too hard." It seems if a trail isn't "just right" somebody is quick to say it's not Overlanding? But who defines "just right" (besides the 3 bears)? I think each individual defines "just right" and their journey is uniquely their own. Some will overland in a Corolla, some will Overland on tons and 40"+ tires.

If you watch the dude's channel 99.99% of what he does isn't like that, and is actually rather mild. I just give him the tip 'o the hat for not being afraid to try something harder - especially because he has a Rubicon on 37"s. I've seen far too many Rubis on 37"s that won't so much as "crawl" over a parking block at the mall, so it's nice to see he uses it to its full capability. Even he states it's not really his desired path though (he was part of a group run which was split-up and he was put in the group going that way...). Is he not an Overlander just because that trail fell between two of his campsites for the trip?

-TJ
 

Lanlubber

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I was mostly making a joke/point that making arbitrary distinctions about what is/is not Overlanding based on the severity of the terrain somebody travels is just silly. I suppose you helped prove my point, the Original Poster was opining that just driving down a dirt-road that even a Corolla could drive isn't Overlanding because it's "too easy." Now you state the guy above isn't Overlanding because it's "too hard." It seems if a trail isn't "just right" somebody is quick to say it's not Overlanding? But who defines "just right" (besides the 3 bears)? I think each individual defines "just right" and their journey is uniquely their own. Some will overland in a Corolla, some will Overland on tons and 40"+ tires.

If you watch the dude's channel 99.99% of what he does isn't like that, and is actually rather mild. I just give him the tip 'o the hat for not being afraid to try something harder - especially because he has a Rubicon on 37"s. I've seen far too many Rubis on 37"s that won't so much as "crawl" over a parking block at the mall, so it's nice to see he uses it to its full capability. Even he states it's not really his desired path though (he was part of a group run which was split-up and he was put in the group going that way...). Is he not an Overlander just because that trail fell between two of his campsites for the trip?

-TJ
I've always said overlanding is akin to our forefathers in their covered wagons. I remember a movie I once saw about the Mormon's going west and crossing the Rockies. They too managed to get over the mountains by hoisting their Rig's up the mountain with ropes and pullies (early day winches) after hoisting their mules and livestock up the mountain the same way. So if this jeep crowd had a destination they were indeed overlanding. Destination is a key word. If they were just challenging their rigs to climb a mountain, then come back down, then it's a sport.
I have watched this guys utubes and he has a boo coo of money sponsers. I consider him a traveler of sorts and camping equipment tester.
 
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tjZ06

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I've always said overlanding is akin to our forefathers in their covered wagons. I remember a movie I once saw about the Mormon's going west and crossing the Rockies. They too managed to get over the mountains by hoisting their Rig's up the mountain with ropes and pullies (early day winches) after hoisting their mules and livestock up the mountain the same way. So if this jeep crowd had a destination they were indeed overlanding. Destination is a key word.
Yup, they did have a desitnation.

If they were just challenging their rigs to climb a mountain, then come back down, then it's a sport.
To be fair, I don't think that particular section of trail was "required" to get where they were going. But this is my point about trying to define what kind of trail is "okay" for an Overlander to use. If it's only "okay" for an Overlander to take the easiest path we'd just be on pavement in minivans. Sometimes an additional challenge is part of the fun. Why can't it be sport and Overlanding? I think trying to box the concept of Overlanding in is counterproductive.

I have watched this guys utubes and he has a boo coo of money sponsers. I consider him a traveler of sorts and camping equipment tester.
I don't know about "boo coo" sponsors. Yes, in the last 6 to 12 months he's picked up sponsors, but go back a couple years and he was just "some dude posting YT vids." Look at his XJ build with his sons, that's a very budget build and something very repeatable by most of us. Even his JK build was pretty much all his bucks. Now, his Gladiator it does seem like he has more sponsors onboard, but does that change who he is or what he's doing? If somebody wanted to throw some free equipment at me for my WJ build in trade for making a YT vid, I'd do it. I have no plan/desire to make YT vids (or do it for the 'gram) but if you're giving me free parts, hell I'm in.

-TJ
 
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JCWages

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I was mostly making a joke/point that making arbitrary distinctions about what is/is not Overlanding based on the severity of the terrain somebody travels is just silly. I suppose you helped prove my point, the Original Poster was opining that just driving down a dirt-road that even a Corolla could drive isn't Overlanding because it's "too easy." Now you state the guy above isn't Overlanding because it's "too hard." It seems if a trail isn't "just right" somebody is quick to say it's not Overlanding? But who defines "just right" (besides the 3 bears)? I think each individual defines "just right" and their journey is uniquely their own. Some will overland in a Corolla, some will Overland on tons and 40"+ tires.

If you watch the dude's channel 99.99% of what he does isn't like that, and is actually rather mild. I just give him the tip 'o the hat for not being afraid to try something harder - especially because he has a Rubicon on 37"s. I've seen far too many Rubis on 37"s that won't so much as "crawl" over a parking block at the mall, so it's nice to see he uses it to its full capability. Even he states it's not really his desired path though (he was part of a group run which was split-up and he was put in the group going that way...). Is he not an Overlander just because that trail fell between two of his campsites for the trip?

-TJ
I agree bro. I usually avoid threads with a negative tone like this but I feel it's important to support anyone who enjoys the outdoors responsibly no matter how expensive or cheap their gear is. The more people enjoy trails the more they will fight to protect them and keep them clean and open. :)
 

tjZ06

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I agree bro. I usually avoid threads with a negative tone like this but I feel it's important to support anyone who enjoys the outdoors responsibly no matter how expensive or cheap their gear is. The more people enjoy trails the more they will fight to protect them and keep them clean and open. :)
100%. As long as people are respecting nature, keeping it clean, and having a good time I don't give a... what they're driving.

-TJ
 

Dave K

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This is so spot on! :tearsofjoy: Too funny.

I am continually impressed by how many people actually give a shit and to what level they care about what other people think. I’m not sure why I am impressed though. It doesn’t matter the subject, this will always exist. For every “thing” being done there will always be a group saying others are not doing that “thing” right. How you should do it, where, for what reason, etc.... you’re doing it wrong! I learned this a long time ago. It may be the reason I have limited close friends, roll solo a lot and would never go out of my way for big group events. I have also been told I’m doing those thing wrong as well though! Oh well. :sunglasses:
 

JCWages

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This is so spot on! :tearsofjoy: Too funny.

I am continually impressed by how many people actually give a shit and to what level they care about what other people think. I’m not sure why I am impressed though. It doesn’t matter the subject, this will always exist. For every “thing” being done there will always be a group saying others are not doing that “thing” right. How you should do it, where, for what reason, etc.... you’re doing it wrong! I learned this a long time ago. It may be the reason I have limited close friends, roll solo a lot and would never go out of my way for big group events. I have also been told I’m doing those thing wrong as well though! Oh well. :sunglasses:
This is exactly what I wanted to say but couldn't put it into words.
 
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bajatacoguy

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Hi, I'm new here but I'm curious about the overlanding I see on many youtube channels. It seems to me that what they're doing is going on flat, very well-worn offroad trails which look like a Corolla could cross them let alone a lifted Jeep. Also I see them crawling along, so I wonder if they might as well be driving Corollas. I had this idea of overlanding being something like long-range off-roading, or off-roading with camping mixed in. Off-roading to me meant crossing a terrain you couldn't in a regular commuter vehicle. Do I have an incorrect concept of overlanding or is what these guys are doing amounts to pretend overlanding?

Why do you care? Just do what you do and don’t worry about what everyone else is doing!
 
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Haminacan

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I have seen so many times on here, "The best overland vehicle is what you have in the driveway" A Prius is a good overland vehicle. JCWages and Dave k have it. We need to be more inclusive. We are all doing it right! Enjoy what people share with us here.
 

OkieMizzou

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I think the term "overlanding" is over-used these days. Driving to a campground or the woods on the weekends and camping is the same thing that it's been all along.... regular ol' camping. Overlanding, in my opinion, is traveling over extended distances and camping along the way. However, regardless of what people call it these days I'm encouraged that the activity has exploded in popularity and thusly created a market desire for better and better equipment. Also, the fact that people are getting off of the couch and getting outdoors... The fellowship of camping is something that's hard to beat.


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