Camp Site Tips and Tricks. | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Camp Site Tips and Tricks.

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Mike G

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San Jose, CA
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1334

I'm sure everyone has a few Camp Site Tips and Tricks they use to make their trips more enjoyable, so I thought I would start this thread. Post anything you think would help out any newbies and experienced campers.
 

Mike G

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So let me go first. When I'd go Backpacking I would always forget my utensils and I would have to eat my food with a stick or my hands. So my trick is when I go to a fast food restaurant, I would always ask for a plastic spoon, knife and fork. If im lucky, I might even get a spork. Right now I have a small collection in my camping container. Great little trick if you find yourself always needing a utensil at camp. (plus, their free)
 

Mike G

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Traveler III

3,745
San Jose, CA
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1334

Use a bucket at the camp site? You should try using a folding bucket from REI, their light weight and packable. I bought one for my sister 20 years ago but hers was a bit thicker then this one and didn't fold into itself. It would also stand up by itself even on a 20 deg. slope for about an hour before it would tip over.
https://www.rei.com/product/782973/sea-to-summit-folding-bucket-10-liters

Camp bucket.jpg
 

Daniel Etter

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Fishers, IN
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Every run into or trip over tent lines or a clothes line in the dark while camping? If so, you should pick some reflective rope. I picked up 50' at Home Depot for $3.00. They also sell a thicker rope at 0.10 cents a foot and it also come in florescent lime green.

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I use these lines for my dogs. I attach one end to my recovery point and the other on a tree. Use carabiners to connect their leash to the line. This gives them 100 feet to run and explore so I don't always have to keep an eye on them. Takes a quick glance down the line and you know what your pet is up to!
 

Winterpeg

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We camp near water typically and bring a water filtration system so we don't have to pack in piles and piles of water. For trips that are longer than 2 days this is vital, especially for a family of 4.

I use the Katadyn Vario. It's the only one I've used so I don't have much to compare it to... but it seems to work well.
http://www.cabelas.ca/product/45507/katadyn-vario-microfilter-water-filter

vario.jpg
 

Gunnermoose

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Mine would have to be the storage solution I have been building in my truck. I has all of my kitchen items handy and doesn't require me to unpack to have lunch on the trail.
I have a towel rack made of a bungee cord, the fridge, one action packer is dishes and pots, the other food. If I need the table it can come right out. I need to complete the drawer under the action packers (it just got a little too hot too soon in AZ this year to stand in the driveway and complete). The drawer holds the stove, a cutting board, bags, drink mixes, etc... There is a little bit of working space in front of the action packers for lunch; table for dinner. To me this was the best thing I have done to make camping so easy.

Phone download 6-8-16 960.JPG
 
E

expeditionnorth

Guest
all good points so far
foremost I look for widow makers, anything that could fall or drop on you
make sure you're at least 50' above a water source like a pond, at night its colder right by the waters edge
make sure the site isnt a drain for local runoff
at least these for starters
 

shoredreamer

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If you sleep in your vehicle or on top you should mount some levels somewhere to easily find a level surface to sleep. If it is just not possible to level out, I find it easier to shave some dirt to lower one corner of the truck instead of having to stack rocks or bring those RV step things. If you are on a solid surface that would be the on,y exception.
image.jpg
Also, If you're in the northern hemisphere and you plan to use an awning you will get maximum shade if you park with the awning side of your vehicle facing north.
 

BeyondthePines

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Advocate II

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Oregon
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1950

I have a question and it might seem stupid to most on here but I am new to overlanding. So when you find your spot to setup camp and you do so accordingly... do you just leave your camp site stuff setup when you leave later that day or the next morning to explore in your rig or do you pack up everything every time you leave the site so nothing gets stolen?
 

Member III

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PDX, OR, USA
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I have a question and it might seem stupid to most on here but I am new to overlanding. So when you find your spot to setup camp and you do so accordingly... do you just leave your camp site stuff setup when you leave later that day or the next morning to explore in your rig or do you pack up everything every time you leave the site so nothing gets stolen?
I worry about this every time I camp, but with the exception of certain obvious high-value items (any electronics, guns if I've brought them of course), I've always left my camp set during day excursions. It's a gamble, I guess, but I've yet to have anything stolen. I usually camp in the same spot for multiple days, so re-packing daily isn't really an option.

That said, one of the reasons to have a relatively fast/light setup is so you can pack and go without hassle. I dunno, like I said, I worry about it every time...
 

Member III

2,741
PDX, OR, USA
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1987

Also, make sure to safely stow/store food and garbage. I take both with me in most cases.

I had theft on the brain cuz there's been a rash of break-ins in Portland lately, so that's what I was thinking about. But, especially in remote areas, you're much more likely to have your camp molested by wildlife...
 

Winterpeg

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Luckily I haven't had any issue with theft. I leave everything out and set up and only lock up guns and electronics in my FJ while I explore on the quads. So that means my extra gas cans, chainsaw, stoves, etc. etc. are all sitting out. Granted if anyone gets where I'm camping they are typically kindred spirits and have the mutual respect that I have for other's stuff I guess.... Other vehicles don't (or can't) get to where I am so it's only boats, atv's, or float planes that get where I am so if anything does get stolen it's only what they can carry out on that.... and there's always the chance that I will be rolling up on them at any moment too that might keep them honest.
 

Winterpeg

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That's the attitude I've always had, but I'm getting more cynical these days...
I hear ya. I'm sure at some point my luck will run out but I'm still throwing those dice out there. At the end of the day if 1 or 2 things get stolen in all the years I spend out in the bush then that's a small price to pay I guess. My most expensive items are the tents and I don't see people stealing a 90 lb tent full of sleeping gear, lol. I will sure be pissed though if ANYTHING gets stolen and will be on a mini-warpath for a while though, lol.

My biggest fear is the safety of my family. When we go exploring it's typically together. I have to constantly remind myself that the other stuff is just "stuff" and can be replaced and take a deep breath and try not to worry about the little things.