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Road

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Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
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Road
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Dude
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6589

Just joined and thought I'd start here. This was a few weeks ago out in Nevada. Did the first half of the week by myself and realized that I really like solo camping.
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Cool image!

Solo camping is the best. Other than having my adult kid with me (she's the best adventure pal ever), I'll solo camp over camping with anyone, anywhere, any day. It distills down to the essence what you do out here and it's entirely up to you to make or break your day, no matter the weather, environment, or gear you have along.
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Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
Dude
Member #

6589

We spent 5 days at Pog Lake in Algonquin Park this week. These were taken on the days that it didn't rain!

View attachment 112090View attachment 112091View attachment 112092
Cool, cool!

Interesting trailer you have there.

I haven't been to Algonquin PP in almost fifty years, when I hitch-hiked up there with a buddy from the Ohio River valley and we canoed/portaged all over the place.

Stopped and got a one person mosquito netting that fits over a sleeping bag (they only had one at the surplus store on Yonge St in Toronto), and had to sleep head to head on the ground with only the upper half of each of us under the net. We'd take the rinds from our oranges and rub it on our skin to help repel mosquitoes and would stay out on the water long as we could to stay away from them, as well.

I'd do it all again in a heartbeat. Now that I have a great, lightweight, canoe of my own I may head that way next year.
 
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PCO6

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Newmarket, Ontario
Member #

12534

Cool, cool!

Interesting trailer you have there.

I haven't been to Algonquin PP in almost fifty years, when I hitch-hiked up there with a buddy from the Ohio River valley and we canoed/portaged all over the place.

Stopped and got a one person mosquito netting that fits over a sleeping bag (they only had one at the surplus store on Yonge St in Toronto), and had to sleep head to head on the ground with only the upper half of each of us under the net. We'd take the rinds from our oranges and rub it on our skin to help repel mosquitoes and would stay out on the water long as we could to stay away from them, as well.

I'd do it all again in a heartbeat. Now that I have a great, lightweight, canoe of my own I may head that way next year.
Thanks re the trailer. They're new for this year and it's been fun getting to know it this summer. I pretty much now know how I want to modify it! I've made some changes so far and I'll start a thread on it once I make some "real" progress.

Algonquin Park is a special place in many people's opinion. A lot has probably changed since you were last there. I learned more on this last visit about the park master plan. It was first adopted in 1974 which coincidentally is the year I started my career as a Planner. I participated in the preparation of many master plan documents over the following 40 years before I retired. The main issue back then was sustainable logging or whether it should continue at all. A lot of the opposition came from canoeists. It still occurs and today everyone happily co-exists. The Highway 60 corridor is designated as a development area and that's where most of the formal campgrounds are. It's easy to camp at any of them and head out for day trips or over nighters. A lot of people head out into the back areas to the north mostly by canoe which is what it sounds like you did.

btw ... the mosquitos are still there! lol It's a lot better at this time of year but in the Spring ... look out!
 
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Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
Dude
Member #

6589

Thanks re the trailer. They're new for this year and it's been fun getting to know it this summer. I pretty much now know how I want to modify it! I've made some changes so far and I'll start a thread on it once I make some "real" progress.

Algonquin Park is a special place in many people's opinion. A lot has probably changed since you were last there. I learned more on this last visit about the park master plan. It was first adopted in 1974 which coincidentally is the year I started my career as a Planner. I participated in the preparation of many master plan documents over the following 40 years before I retired. The main issue back then was sustainable logging or whether it should continue at all. A lot of the opposition came from canoeists. It still occurs and today everyone happily co-exists. The Highway 60 corridor is designated as a development area and that's where most of the formal campgrounds are. It's easy to camp at any of them and head out for day trips or over nighters. A lot of people head out into the back areas to the north mostly by canoe which is what it sounds like you did.

btw ... the mosquitos are still there! lol It's a lot better at this time of year but in the Spring ... look out!
Interesting. Thanks for the reply. I've been watching and reading a lot about forest management here in New England and why it's done, or not, on state properties. Sometimes it's just about harvesting for financial gain, a lot of times it is not.

All rather fascinating, really. I think if more folks would take the time to learn about long-range plans and the reasons behind some practices and what has worked or not over the years--like cutting some species to allow another to take hold again, or clearing and harvesting downed timber for fire control, or harvesting to limit spread of disease--they may be more understanding.
 
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PCO6

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Newmarket, Ontario
Member #

12534

Interesting. Thanks for the reply. I've been watching and reading a lot about forest management here in New England and why it's done, or not, on state properties. Sometimes it's just about harvesting for financial gain, a lot of times it is not.

All rather fascinating, really. I think if more folks would take the time to learn about long-range plans and the reasons behind some practices and what has worked or not over the years--like cutting some species to allow another to take hold again, or clearing and harvesting downed timber for fire control, or harvesting to limit spread of disease--they may be more understanding.
Forest management really is an interesting matter. I dealt with specialists in the field (or forest) for years always in an urban context, first as a municipal Planner, then as a land use and development consultant and eventually as a land developer ... that's when things got interesting. When you tell people that you want to remove 30 ac. or what ever of trees it gets their attention. There was never a dull moment at public meetings. With very few exceptions and they were minor, we had the full support of the government agencies. We often joked that we were doing the dirty work for them. Some will disagree but public policy is usually well thought out and technically justified.
 
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MrCoffee

Rank VI
Benefactor
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Traveler III

3,316
Springfield, Vermont
First Name
Chuck
Last Name
U
Member #

8434

Ham Callsign
KB1PMW
Well my most recent camp shot is a tad bit different..... :/ We've been spending a lot more time in the Class A while the Truck camper is being rebuilt/fixed.....

20190805_204609.jpg
 
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