OB Approved B.O.B. (Bug out Bag)

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Ghost

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I carry a get home bag pretty much anywhere I go. If i am more than 40 miles from home i use a 72 hour bag and it just amplifies my day bag. Day bag consists of water,food, fire med, protection. I work 25 miles from my house and know it would take me 8 hours roughly to get home. Carry enough water to get me through a day plus ways of cleaning water. Enough energy bars and a meal bar that I could get through a day of living on just that. Ways to making fire and a trama kit and a small bobo kit. Carry 3 spare loaded mags for my ccw. Also carry a map of secondary roads routes marked to fallow. Where i live its crazy to think but if we where in a grid lock situation my first move is to get home to my family.. at all costs! If the main roads are wiped out. Life would suck. Few years ago had a big flood that closes every bridge in a 100 mile radius it pretty much closed every road in the area down. Out on the trail. I carry a 72 hour bag. Which if i am stuck and have to find help or what ever the case. I know i can survive 72 hours out of that bag. Most places i go, i know i am not more than a days hike out of. But any over night travel i log that as two days and need more logistics specially in the winter when I do alot of stuff alone. More water. More fire more food more medical. Carry a rifle along with my ccw.

Bugging out as always been surreal to me. Cus all the prepping ive done. Everything is at home. The old lady knows if anything happens to get home. If she doesnt get home. My job is to help her get home. The what ifs are hugely important
I can relate to everything you said regarding your preps and the logistics with the wife. I’m very much in the same boat. Fortunately she has a lot of grit and has lived in this area her whole life. Hell, she was up at 5am to load horses this morning while I was still sleeping.

I also get the dread of having to bug out when you’ve prepared to survive at home (or live comfortably during harsh times). Figured out a couple summers ago that all that goes out the window when you are looking at this out your living room window. While we dodged the bullet it added a serious bit of reality to our preparedness game.

A772B460-A6C7-4872-95EC-50957E448C89.jpeg
 

Roam_CO85

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I can relate to everything you said regarding your preps and the logistics with the wife. I’m very much in the same boat. Fortunately she has a lot of grit and has lived in this area her whole life. Hell, she was up at 5am to load horses this morning while I was still sleeping.

I also get the dread of having to bug out when you’ve prepared to survive at home (or live comfortably during harsh times). Figured out a couple summers ago that all that goes out the window when you are looking at this out your living room window. While we dodged the bullet it added a serious bit of reality to our preparedness game.

View attachment 111944
Mine is in the same boat. She can take very good care of her self and than some!

I was a wildland firefighter for over 9 years. never got use to seeing those people leaving everything they worked for as I am rolling up to give them hope that it “might” still be there when they are given the ok to come home or that Mr and Mrs Smith I regret to inform you. Being in a mountain home thats a life style you have to live with. the winters are pretty sketchy too. Specially for a commuter if your stranded in town cus the roads are closed and cant get home. Get stuck between the house and town. The fires are devastating because as you know you can only grab and go with so much.. we have horses as well and thats another logistical experience in its self. Its crazy to see how many for sale signs you see after a fire rolls through a forest close to communities. Everyone wants a mountain home...but it takes a special type of familys to live in them. You just have to prep and be prepared for it. Firewise is a huge deal and it saves homes. Had a old fire boss that his place on the mountain looked like a zeroscapers wet dream but knew it might stand up to a fire
 
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Ghost

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North Bonneville, WA, USA
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M
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Mine is in the same boat. She can take very good care of her self and than some!

I was a wildland firefighter for over 9 years. never got use to seeing those people leaving everything they worked for as I am rolling up to give them hope that it “might” still be there when they are given the ok to come home or that Mr and Mrs Smith I regret to inform you. Being in a mountain home thats a life style you have to live with. the winters are pretty sketchy too. Specially for a commuter if your stranded in town cus the roads are closed and cant get home. Get stuck between the house and town. The fires are devastating because as you know you can only grab and go with so much.. we have horses as well and thats another logistical experience in its self. Its crazy to see how many for sale signs you see after a fire rolls through a forest close to communities. Everyone wants a mountain home...but it takes a special type of familys to live in them. You just have to prep and be prepared for it. Firewise is a huge deal and it saves homes. Had a old fire boss that his place on the mountain looked like a zeroscapers wet dream but knew it might stand up to a fire
Good on you for the firefighting. I volunteered about 20 years in 3 counties, 5 department and finally hung things up after being Chief for a few. Zero rewards in that position :laughing: :laughing: :laughing: So I’ve also seen people lose everything and as sad as it is it’s only things. I had the kids and wife evac a couple summers ago when things blew up here and my daughters were stressed about losing the house. I just told them we will build a bigger better one and they get to go shopping for new things every weekend.

As for the city slickers that crave the country life. The house next to ours is on its third family in about 10 years. They seem to only last about 2 winters and move back to the city. IMO we don’t even have it that bad beings the “City” (mt. town population 600ish) plows what they can. I have friends & family that have to plow themselves out all winter. We just run 4wheel drives and keep the driveway beat down.

Seems we have a bit in common reading some of your other post so I’m hitting the stalker button. Following :laughing:
 
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Roam_CO85

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Good on you for the firefighting. I volunteered about 20 years in 3 counties, 5 department and finally hung things up after being Chief for a few. Zero rewards in that position :laughing: :laughing: :laughing: So I’ve also seen people lose everything and as sad as it is it’s only things. I had the kids and wife evac a couple summers ago when things blew up here and my daughters were stressed about losing the house. I just told them we will build a bigger better one and they get to go shopping for new things every weekend.

As for the city slickers that crave the country life. The house next to ours is on its third family in about 10 years. They seem to only last about 2 winters and move back to the city. IMO we don’t even have it that bad beings the “City” (mt. town population 600ish) plows what they can. I have friends & family that have to plow themselves out all winter. We just run 4wheel drives and keep the driveway beat down.

Seems we have a bit in common reading some of your other post so I’m hitting the stalker button. Following :laughing:
You are correct it’s certainly just stuff and things. They can be replaced, lives can not! From the ashes becomes a new canvas!

I volunteered with the town I grew up in and did the professional forestry stuff in the summers so i got a taste of both sides. That command staff position junk is more political it got worse the more the town grew! Now I find my self going into the other extreme and thats the law enforcement community
 

Ghost

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You are correct it’s certainly just stuff and things. They can be replaced, lives can not! From the ashes becomes a new canvas!

I volunteered with the town I grew up in and did the professional forestry stuff in the summers so i got a taste of both sides. That command staff position junk is more political it got worse the more the town grew! Now I find my self going into the other extreme and thats the law enforcement community
You nailed it on the politics. It was the reason I finally hung things up. As for the LE while I’m friends with most of the local active and retired guys, it wasn’t something I ever really considered. I do however spend a good deal of time traveling for training $$$$ and spend 10 times what most do on the range.
 
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Roam_CO85

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You nailed it on the politics. It was the reason I finally hung things up. As for the LE while I’m friends with most of the local active and retired guys, it wasn’t something I ever really considered. I do however spend a good deal of time traveling for training $$$$ and spend 10 times what most do on the range.
I shoot alot! Try and shoot 1000 rounds a month and up tell recently here do a few trainings a year. With school and everything has taken most of my time. Range time is easier to hit. Was kinda in the same boat... as a firefighter you were liked and joked with the PD about how they werent. I was out of the fire service for awhile and been fighting that public service itch for a while. Wanting todo the natural resources or fish and wildlife enforcement or a small town community. Feel like ive been there done that with the med/fire side.
 
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Ghost

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We are on about the same regiment. I’m about 2 miles from a rural private range and 9 out of 10 days I’m there alone. I try to take 2 bigger classes a year (Arizona November) and take about everything local clubs & ranges offer if the instructors are reputable. After that it’s just getting in the reps.

We totally Hijacked this Thread but IMO a firearm should be part of it and if you are carrying one you better get Training. Oh and I know “I’ve been shooting for 40 years” :laughing: Me too but I don’t count a day of shooting bullseyes on a static range training or practice for a real fight.
 
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Roam_CO85

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We are on about the same regiment. I’m about 2 miles from a rural private range and 9 out of 10 days I’m there alone. I try to take 2 bigger classes a year (Arizona November) and take about everything local clubs & ranges offer if the instructors are reputable. After that it’s just getting in the reps.

We totally Hijacked this Thread but IMO a firearm should be part of it and if you are carrying one you better get Training. Oh and I know “I’ve been shooting for 40 years” :laughing: Me too but I don’t count a day of shooting bullseyes on a static range training or practice for a real fight.

I agree as well that it should be part of it!! I my self don’t consider a get home bag or bug out bag complete with out a firearm or ammunition. Also agree if you carry or stow one that person should seek training!! That oh well i went through a CCW class so I am set up for success..face palm!...or i go out and plink all the time...like that guy thats been shooting for 40 years that maybe goes out a few times a year.

Shooting is fun but ive gotta be out there for a purpose. i find there is always something to learn or work on.
 
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Ghost

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I agree as well that it should be part of it!! I my self don’t consider a get home bag or bug out bag complete with out a firearm or ammunition. Also agree if you carry or stow one that person should seek training!! That oh well i went through a CCW class so I am set up for success..face palm!...or i go out and plink all the time...like that guy thats been shooting for 40 years that maybe goes out a few times a year.

Shooting is fun but ive gotta be out there for a purpose. i find there is always something to learn or work on.
Agree 100% with all of that. Even down to the facepalm :laughing: :laughing: :laughing: :laughing: :laughing:Especially the facepalm
 
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Specter

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Bug out bags are great, but experience has taught me that there are only two things that you are always going to have in a survival situation - your body and your mind. If you are serious about preparing for a SHTF/Survival situation, start by getting healthy and in shape and sharpening your knowledge and skills. All the gear in the world can’t save you if your body and mind aren’t ready for the fight.

Solid list for a BOB/Get home bag, none-the-less!
 
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Roam_CO85

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Bug out bags are great, but experience has taught me that there are only two things that you are always going to have in a survival situation - your body and your mind. If you are serious about preparing for a SHTF/Survival situation, start by getting healthy and in shape and sharpening your knowledge and skills. All the gear in the world can’t save you if your body and mind aren’t ready for the fight.

Solid list for a BOB/Get home bag, none-the-less!
Mindset and fitness is a huge part of it! Well said!
 
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JimInBC

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Was looking for input on particulate masks. I live in territory where forst fire is a definite possiblity along with other dust possibilities depending on if I am in the city or not. I have a 9 year old, and nothing fits his face well. I was looking for something moderate in size so that 3 do not take a ton of room.

I have found keeping a pair of boots or at least sturdy runners in the vehicle important as well as clothing that is more appropriate to long treks if your job requires dressier attire. This was an important part for my wife.

Running, at a minimum, table top scenarios is helpful too. It finds gaps in plans. It helped us figure out how to place meet up points based on what ifs. The right quake could take out bridges that would make it harder to meet up.

thanks for the lists and discussion.
 

Roam_CO85

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I keep a pair of light weight hiking boots in my get home bag thats the bigger 72 hour bag. Just some ones that are half worn out that if your wearing tennis shoes. Table topping is a valuable training tool. This came in very handy in the last chapter or life.. and probably pretty important in the new one thats being wrote right now. Planning before you go is huge. Playing with the what if’s is a huge mental tool. I learned this back when I was a kid. That you lay everything out so you can visualize everything that your packing so you know what your lacking or what you have missed. My 72 hour bag gets pulled apart every new season so I can swap winter stuff for summer or lighter cold gear for fall. Swap out ammo thats been stored. More food stuff like that. The masks are a good idea. Ive found medical masks work very well and don’t take anything for room. Some have children sizes
 
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chrismutchler

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This is a great list of things to consider for a Bug-Out bag or 72-hour kit. My oldest is now driving, and living in Colorado, it's possible she'll find herself in a situation where she could become stranded. Many of these suggestions are going to make it into the Get Home bag I am working on for her.

Thank you for sharing.
 

Specter

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Just remember, when you move the clocks forward or backward for daylight savings time, it’s time to check and update your bag. This keeps you familiar with it, makes sure you have seasonal appropriate clothes and ensures batteries, OTC medications, etc. are changed, etc.
 
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