OB Approved B.O.B. (Bug out Bag)

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Kyle & Kari Frink

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

4,226
San Diego, California
Member #

6376

B.O.B. Promo.jpg SURVIVAL CONSIDERATION:
For those of you who consider yourselves or want to be a:
  • "Survivalist"
  • "Doomsday Prepper"
  • "Zombie Apocalypse/Outbreak Survivalist"
  • "Alien Invasion Survivalist"
  • "Armageddon Survivalist"
  • "End Timer"
If you think or feel that any of these might apply to you, consider putting together a Bug Out Bag.

We simply call it being prepared! So let's bring it back to a more prevalent situation of sorts, that is relevant to "Overlanding".​
HYPOTHETICAL SITUATION:

You and your family are out exploring, you are placed in a situation that requires you to leave the safety of your rig due to any number of reasons.
  • Scenarios:
    • Rig catches on fire in an uncontrolled manner, which you are unable to put out quickly.
    • Rig is on the edge of a cliff in a non recoverable situation without help nearby.
    • Natural Disaster that forces you to find shelter such as a Tornado.
    • Criminals/Degenerates start shooting up your Rig (You never know!)
    • Accident/Situation leaving your Rig without the ability to be driven. That occurs in the middle of nowhere or far enough away from help.
  • Whatever may be the specific event that has occurred, it can happen fast! Your decision in certain situations could require you to act IMMEDIATELY and WITHOUT DELAY.
The event occurring can be classified as Fight or Flight/Life or Death/Evacuation for Survival situation.
Please keep that in mind when making the choice to put together your "Bug Out Bag".
With all this being said:

Would you have the gear, supplies, sustenance, and med kit readily available to be taken with you in a moments notice?
NOTE:

You should be aware that this "Bug out Bag" is simply to get you through the survival of the next 72Hrs or so. This time frame is based on how long it typically takes Emergency Services once deployed to reach people. This is not a fixed location of supplies, food, and resources. This is for mobile use in a type of evacuation, escape, and survival situation kept in a single or few containers such as Backpacks and MOLE Bags.

Keep in mind these are things you probably take on your trips, however this bag is meant to have these items in it at all times to be prepared for such cases.
BUG OUT BAG (TYPICAL CONTENTS):
Before we get into specifics/recommendations for contents to be included in your B.O.B.
There are 5 key categories you should consider when putting together a B.O.B.

  • Food/Water
  • First Aid
  • Self Defense Protection
  • Shelter
  • Clothing
  1. First and Foremost Non-perishable food (examples: MRE's, dried fruit, crackers, CLIF bars, Mountain House Freeze Dried Food, Canned Goods, Dehydrated Foods) and water for 72HRS. You should pack 2 liters of water per person per day. This is 6 liters of water per person for 3 DAYS. Also a means of water purification is a good item to have. Since your water will be in storage for considerable amounts of time, use Long term water storage additive. However after a considerable period of time swap out the water and repeat the process)
  2. A Disaster/Survival Guide because not everyone remembers everything, or has had training in survival situations so a guide will do you well to have.
  3. First Aid Kit [Next to sustenance, it is very important that you have this item. Do not skimp on your selection] North American Rescue is a great and highly reliable medical source for these items.
  4. Maps of the area you live in (FOR END OF THE WORLD, BAD DAY SITUATION), and situational maps of the areas you will be traveling to. This should include a compass.
  5. A means of defending yourself, such as a knife/machete, bear mace, nightstick/baton.
    • For Those of you who will say a Gun, I agree but remember not every state lets you carry a handgun concealed, plus you don't want to leave your firearm unsupervised in your Bug Out Bag in the Rig all the time. You should keep your firearm either in a safe , on your person (for those of you who have a CCW in an area/state that authorizes it.) or close by in your Rig while you are traveling in it.
  6. Flashlights (to include extra batteries)
  7. Fire Starter and or Weather Proof Matches
  8. Emergency Whistle
  9. Battery or Crank-operated Radio
  10. Handheld Communications if desired.
  11. Extra Socks and underclothing to include breathable Rain jackets or emergency poncho. This is at a minimum for clothing. If you feel the need to be more prepared pack hiking boots/shoes and a set of clothes for warm and cold weather.
  12. Small Hatchet and or Folding Saw to use for collecting wood for a fire.
  13. Tampons (For Females) [Not to be used to clot/stuff Bullet puncture wounds]
  14. Hand Sanitizer and Baby Wipes
  15. Wipes for bathroom use.
  16. Waste Bag
  17. Flares/Glowsticks/Flare Gun
  18. Multi-tool (such as a Gerber or Leatherman)
  19. A means of creating shelter: some form a lightweight tarp to keep the rain and elements off you whilst you sleep. If you want to spend the extra money we recommend an ENO hammock to keep you off the ground. They are super lightweight and roll up into a small ball, a must especially in this type of situation.
  20. 200ft. of Paracord (For assisting in hanging your tarp for shelter.)
  21. Diapers & Wipes (If you have children that still wear them this is a must.)
  22. Prescription Medicine (If you or a family member have a medical condition requiring medicine which does not need to be refrigerated. Consider keeping 72HRS of this medicine in your B.O.B.)
  23. Mechanix's Gloves and or Leather Gloves
  24. Binoculars (there may be times you will need help visually identifying structures the naked eye might not see that could bring you help and or save you.)
  25. Rite in the Rain Pen & Paper/Roll of Streamer material to mark your path ( The Paper is for leaving Messages to assist in finding you, should you think you have become seriously lost).
  26. Sunglasses
  27. Climbing Rope to include Carabiners that are actually meant for holding the weight of a full grown person. (In the unfortunate case you should need to rappel/climb down a cliff or steep embankment. Please if you are going to take this item have an understanding or receive training on how to properly use this tool to your advantage, so as not to make your situation worse).
  28. Last but not least Handheld GPS! (If you do not have a handheld GPS, you can use as we have shown a Garmin GPS meant for a vehicle powered by a battery pack will more than suffice. However you should have an actual handheld GPS)
CONCLUSION:

At this point you may be thinking to yourself "Man that is a lot of stuff! How can I fit all that into a backpack?" If you take the time to properly pack these items, storage in one or two backpacks is more than do-able.

When choosing items to purchase for your bag, consider lightweight components. Most of the items listed above do not particularly weigh that much but together they do add up. The extra weight over time can weigh on you, but remember this is about survival for 72HRS. The will power of your mind can either be your best friend or your worst enemy.

Stay positive and set obtainable goals to keep you on track so that you will make it out/stay alive!

Just remember there is no such thing as "The Perfect B.O.B." it is situationally based.

Simply keep in mind the 5 Key Categories we previously listed when choosing what should go in your B.O.B.

GO PREPARED!

After setting out our B.O.B. we realized we ourselves were missing several items we mentioned above. This is a prime example to regularly check your inventory at least every quarter of the year. Another deficiency (in our opinion) we realized is that we want to upgrade our bag to one with a little more volume. Also please note that you can more than easily stow all this gear into 2 separate backpacks to help share the load among your family or friends if you are not traveling solo.

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IMG_2507.JPG IMG_2512.JPG
IMG_2522.JPG
IMG_2529.JPG
IMG_2515.JPG
 
Last edited:

Chadlyb

Rank V
Member
Supporter

Advocate III

2,779
Bend, OR, USA
Member #

7632

SURVIVAL CONSIDERATION:
For those of you who consider yourselves or want to be a:
  • "Survivalist"
  • "Doomsday Prepper"
  • "Zombie Apocalypse/Outbreak Survivalist"
  • "Alien Invasion Survivalist"
  • "Armageddon Survivalist"
  • "End Timer"
If you think or feel that any of these might apply to you, consider putting together a Bug Out Bag.

We simply call it being prepared! So let's bring it back to a more prevalent situation of sorts, that is relevant to "Overlanding".​
HYPOTHETICAL SITUATION:

You and your family are out exploring, you are placed in a situation that requires you to leave the safety of your rig due to any number of reasons.
  • Scenarios:
    • Rig catches on fire in an uncontrolled manner, which you are unable to put out quickly.
    • Rig is on the edge of a cliff in a non recoverable situation without help nearby.
    • Natural Disaster that forces you to find shelter such as a Tornado.
    • Criminals/Degenerates start shooting up your Rig (You never know!)
    • Accident/Situation leaving your Rig without the ability to be driven. That occurs in the middle of nowhere or far enough away from help.
  • Whatever may be the specific event that has occurred, it can happen fast! Your decision in certain situations could require you to act IMMEDIATELY and WITHOUT DELAY.
The event occurring can be classified as Fight or Flight/Life or Death/Evacuation for Survival situation.
Please keep that in mind when making the choice to put together your "Bug Out Bag".
With all this being said:

Would you have the gear, supplies, sustenance, and med kit readily available to be taken with you in a moments notice?
NOTE:

You should be aware that this "Bug out Bag" is simply to get you through the survival of the next 72Hrs or so. This time frame is based on how long it typically takes Emergency Services once deployed to reach people. This is not a fixed location of supplies, food, and resources. This is for mobile use in a type of evacuation, escape, and survival situation kept in a single or few containers such as Backpacks and MOLE Bags.

Keep in mind these are things you probably take on your trips, however this bag is meant to have these items in it at all times to be prepared for such cases.
BUG OUT BAG (TYPICAL CONTENTS):
Before we get into specifics/recommendations for contents to be included in your B.O.B.
There are 5 key categories you should consider when putting together a B.O.B.

  • Food/Water
  • First Aid
  • Self Defense Protection
  • Shelter
  • Clothing
  1. First and Foremost Non-perishable food (examples: MRE's, dried fruit, crackers, CLIF bars, Mountain House Freeze Dried Food, Canned Goods, Dehydrated Foods) and water for 72HRS. You should pack 2 liters of water per person per day. This is 6 liters of water per person for 3 DAYS. Also a means of water purification is a good item to have. Since your water will be in storage for considerable amounts of time, use Long term water storage additive. However after a considerable period of time swap out the water and repeat the process)
  2. A Disaster/Survival Guide because not everyone remembers everything, or has had training in survival situations so a guide will do you well to have.
  3. First Aid Kit [Next to sustenance, it is very important that you have this item. Do not skimp on your selection] North American Rescue is a great and highly reliable medical source for these items.
  4. Maps of the area you live in (FOR END OF THE WORLD, BAD DAY SITUATION), and situational maps of the areas you will be traveling to. This should include a compass.
  5. A means of defending yourself, such as a knife/machete, bear mace, nightstick/baton.
    • For Those of you who will say a Gun, I agree but remember not every state lets you carry a handgun concealed, plus you don't want to leave your firearm unsupervised in your Bug Out Bag in the Rig all the time. You should keep your firearm either in a safe , on your person (for those of you who have a CCW in an area/state that authorizes it.) or close by in your Rig while you are traveling in it.
  6. Flashlights (to include extra batteries)
  7. Fire Starter and or Weather Proof Matches
  8. Emergency Whistle
  9. Battery or Crank-operated Radio
  10. Handheld Communications if desired.
  11. Extra Socks and underclothing to include breathable Rain jackets or emergency poncho. This is at a minimum for clothing. If you feel the need to be more prepared pack hiking boots/shoes and a set of clothes for warm and cold weather.
  12. Small Hatchet and or Folding Saw to use for collecting wood for a fire.
  13. Tampons (For Females)
  14. Hand Sanitizer and Baby Wipes
  15. Wipes for bathroom use.
  16. Waste Bag
  17. Flares/Glowsticks/Flare Gun
  18. Multi-tool (such as a Gerber or Leatherman)
  19. A means of creating shelter: some form a lightweight tarp to keep the rain and elements off you whilst you sleep. If you want to spend the extra money we recommend an ENO hammock to keep you off the ground. They are super lightweight and roll up into a small ball, a must especially in this type of situation.
  20. 200ft. of Paracord (For assisting in hanging your tarp for shelter.)
  21. Diapers & Wipes (If you have children that still wear them this is a must.)
  22. Prescription Medicine (If you or a family member have a medical condition requiring medicine which does not need to be refrigerated. Consider keeping 72HRS of this medicine in your B.O.B.)
  23. Mechanix's Gloves and or Leather Gloves
  24. Binoculars (there may be times you will need help visually identifying structures the naked eye might not see that could bring you help and or save you.)
  25. Rite in the Rain Pen & Paper/Roll of Streamer material to mark your path ( The Paper is for leaving Messages to assist in finding you, should you think you have become seriously lost).
  26. Sunglasses
  27. Climbing Rope to include Carabiners that are actually meant for holding the weight of a full grown person. (In the unfortunate case you should need to rappel/climb down a cliff or steep embankment. Please if you are going to take this item have an understanding or receive training on how to properly use this tool to your advantage, so as not to make your situation worse).
  28. Last but not least Handheld GPS!
CONCLUSION:

At this point you may be thinking to yourself "Man that is a lot of stuff! How can I fit all that into a backpack?" If you take the time to properly pack these items, storage in one or two backpacks is more than do-able.

When choosing items to purchase for your bag, consider lightweight components. Most of the items listed above do not particularly weigh that much but together they do add up. The extra weight over time can weigh on you, but remember this is about survival for 72HRS. The will power of your mind can either be your best friend or your worst enemy.

Stay positive and set obtainable goals to keep you on track so that you will make it out/stay alive!

Just remember there is no such thing as "The Perfect B.O.B." it is situationally based.

Simply keep in mind the 5 Key Categories we previously listed when choosing what should go in your B.O.B.

GO PREPARED!
Totally digging this...
 

vegasjeepguy

Rank V
Member

Advocate II

2,566
Gravette, AR, USA
Member #

1130

I was thinking about this today and how unprepared most everyone I know is. Prepper/survivalist, of which I consider myself one, is probably at the top of the list in terms of overall preparedness, understanding there is a huge range within that group. This group would be the smallest as a percentage of the population.

That said, I would consider overlander next on that ladder primarily because their focus tends to be vehicle centric and outfitting their rigs to get them were they want to go and sustain them once they get there. They may not have the primary goal of preparing for the zombie apocalypse, but they have most of the tools and are easily adapted to improve their odds. This group tends to be larger than the preppers, but still relatively small. I just think of the number of people with whom I can call to “head out” and I can count them on one (maybe two) hand.

Next are campers. The biggest difference with them and the overlander is that lack of vehicle preps. Included within this group are backpackers who do what overlander do, only without a vehicle. Campers have a lot of the same gear, but tend to be more limited where they can go and how long they can stay because of lacking a capable rig. This group is larger than the previously mentioned two, but it is still surprising to me how few people have even basic gear (tent, sleeping bags, camp stove, etc.) at their disposal and would either need to borrow or make a quick (and expensive) run to REI to get what they need. And most of them would have to ask a salesperson WHAT they need.

The last group that I would consider to share at least a little of the preparedness mindset are the hikers. They may never spend a night in the woods, but at least they have the necessary gear (footwear, packs, water containers, etc.) to head out to the wilds for the day. And, in a pinch, they could sustain themselves for a couple of days in an emergency situation. Although by far the largest group of any previously mentioned, even hikers tend to be a bit of a rarity when compared to the rest of society at large. I just think of all the people I know who don’t even own a decent pair of boots for a mild walk in the woods.

And that leaves us with the vast majority of the rest of the people. They have no interest in pursuing anything out of doors, except perhaps that scenic overlook they pass when driving from LA to Vegas for a “guys weekend”. The thought of ever owning, much less needing, any type of “gear” doesn’t even enter their minds. And if the shit ever does hit the fan, 99% of them are screwed...unless they are friends with us, close friends.
 
Last edited:

Kyle & Kari Frink

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

4,226
San Diego, California
Member #

6376

I was thinking about this today and how unprepared most everyone I know is. Prepper/survivalist, of which I consider myself one, is probably at the top of the list in terms of overall preparedness, understanding there is a huge range within that group. This group would be the smallest as a percentage of the population.

That said, I would consider overlander next on that ladder primarily because their focus tends to be vehicle centric and outfitting their rigs to get them were they want to go and sustain them once they get there. They may not have the primary goal of preparing for the zombie apocalypse, but they have most of the tools and are easily adapted to improve their odds. This group tends to be larger than the preppers, but still relatively small. I just think of the number of people with whom I can call to “head out” and I can count them on one (maybe two) hand.

Next are campers. The biggest difference with them and the overlander is that lack of vehicle preps. Included within this group are backpackers who do what overlander do, only without a vehicle. Campers have a lot of the same gear, but tend to be more limited where they can go and how long they can stay because of lacking a capable rig. This group is larger than the previously mentioned two, but it is still surprising to me how few people have even basic gear (tent, sleeping bags, camp stove, etc.) at their disposal and would either need to borrow or make a quick (and expensive) run to REI to get what they need. And most of them would have to ask a salesperson WHAT they need.

The last group that I would consider to share at least a little of the preparedness mindset are the hikers. They may never spend a night in the woods, but at least they have the necessary gear (footwear, packs, water containers, etc.) to head out to the wilds for the day. And, in a pinch, they could sustain themselves for a couple of days in an emergency situation. Although by far the largest group of any previously mentioned, even hikers tend to be a bit of a rarity when compared to the rest of society at large. I just think of all the people I know who don’t even own a decent pair of boots for a mild walk in the woods.

And that leaves us with the vast majority of the rest of the people. They have no interest in pursuing anything out of doors, except perhaps that scenic overlook they pass when driving from LA to Vegas for a “guys weekend”. The thought of ever owning, much less needing, any type of “gear” doesn’t even enter their minds. And if the shit ever does hit the fan, 99% of them are screwed...unless they are friends with us, close friends.
Very wise words, like how you started from top to bottom lol. Very nice!
 

systemdelete

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Nashville, TN
First Name
Erik
Last Name
Rumbaugh
Member #

13761

So, um how much does your bag weigh?

In a shake down before a big trip if one of my scouts brought half of what you have there it would be binned.

I say that because I believe the purpose of a bail out bag is to remain mobile, and lugging a 60lb pack on your back in most terrain is not particularly mobile.


I do totally agree with many of your choices though. As a goal most of our scouts shoot for 20lbs before food and water. I hiked for two weeks through New Mexico with a 15lb base weight, but that was splitting the weight of a tent with a partner.

My pack was around 35lbs with a full weeks food loadout. The only thing I add to my current BOB that I didn’t carry there is my pistol and a few magazines of ammo.

Keep in mind that distance may equal safety, and less weight will make it much easier to cover a great distance reasonably swiftly on foot.
 
Last edited:

Kyle & Kari Frink

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

4,226
San Diego, California
Member #

6376

So, um how much does your bag weigh?

In a shake down before a big trip if one of my scouts brought half of what you have there it would be binned.

I say that because I believe the purpose of a bail out bag is to remain mobile, and lugging a 60lb pack on your back in most terrain is not particularly mobile.


I do totally agree with many of your choices though. As a goal most of our scouts shoot for 20lbs before food and water. I hiked for two weeks through New Mexico with a 15lb base weight, but that was splitting the weight of a tent with a partner.

My pack was around 35lbs with a full weeks food loadout. The only thing I add to my current BOB that I didn’t carry there is my pistol and a few magazines of ammo.

Keep in mind that distance may equal safety, and less weight will make it much easier to cover a great distance reasonably swiftly on foot.
You are totally right about distance versus weight.

If I had to gander I would say 50lbs total for everything shown, never thought to weigh them. Now I'm curious...

Also to add more info, the wife's pack is the same just a different color than mine and splits the lighter items/food along with her clothes and our children's clothes. As for the shelter hammock. Ours is a double nest meant for two adults. Yes not very comfy but survival isn't so I imagine we would just sleep with our two little ones till they get bigger for warmth and peace of mind "security".

As I clearly stated multiple times in the article every B.O.B. is different for every situation. With the exception of missing items also mentioned, our packs are a little over prepared and under prepared as some might think.

Another "life choice" most don't make is exercise (real good exercise, not just walking lol) and I mean doing cardio on a regular basis along with weight training. Mixed with actually hiking/biking/running. Whatever your fancy of cardio, this will greatly increase your chances of survival not just "oh hey I have all this stuff and some variation of survival training."

Also refer to the conclusion section near the end where it talks about taking the lightweight route and options and references what you have said.

Thanks for the input!
 
Last edited:

VCeXpedition

Rank V
Member

Off-Road Ranger I

2,932
Torrance, L.A., Cal., Earth
First Name
Dan
Last Name
Rich
Member #

0582

Ham Callsign
K6DHR
So, um how much does your bag weigh?

In a shake down before a big trip if one of my scouts brought half of what you have there it would be binned.

I say that because I believe the purpose of a bail out bag is to remain mobile, and lugging a 60lb pack on your back in most terrain is not particularly mobile.


I do totally agree with many of your choices though. As a goal most of our scouts shoot for 20lbs before food and water. I hiked for two weeks through New Mexico with a 15lb base weight, but that was splitting the weight of a tent with a partner.

My pack was around 35lbs with a full weeks food loadout. The only thing I add to my current BOB that I didn’t carry there is my pistol and a few magazines of ammo.

Keep in mind that distance may equal safety, and less weight will make it much easier to cover a great distance reasonably swiftly on foot.

@systemdelete you bring up a really good and important point, weight must be a consideration when going mobile.
I'm always looking to improve the items in my BOB and this is a great post to fine-tune some of those things, add some, consolidate, etc.

That said, to pack for a known trip for a fixed distance and time period on known terrain is very different than making a BOB. Some similarities and items for sure but a very different end-goal.

Thanks @Kyle & Kari Frink for this list, and others for the feedback, this is a great way to come up with what works best for me and my situation.
I have a special needs adult daughter that would be pretty much incapable of carrying even 20 lbs in a backpack, so there's a big consideration for me and my wife.



Thanks and keep the feedback coming!

Dan.
 

Traveler I

816
Nor Cal
View attachment 66271 SURVIVAL CONSIDERATION:
For those of you who consider yourselves or want to be a:
  • "Survivalist"
  • "Doomsday Prepper"
  • "Zombie Apocalypse/Outbreak Survivalist"
  • "Alien Invasion Survivalist"
  • "Armageddon Survivalist"
  • "End Timer"
If you think or feel that any of these might apply to you, consider putting together a Bug Out Bag.

We simply call it being prepared! So let's bring it back to a more prevalent situation of sorts, that is relevant to "Overlanding".​
HYPOTHETICAL SITUATION:

You and your family are out exploring, you are placed in a situation that requires you to leave the safety of your rig due to any number of reasons.
  • Scenarios:
    • Rig catches on fire in an uncontrolled manner, which you are unable to put out quickly.
    • Rig is on the edge of a cliff in a non recoverable situation without help nearby.
    • Natural Disaster that forces you to find shelter such as a Tornado.
    • Criminals/Degenerates start shooting up your Rig (You never know!)
    • Accident/Situation leaving your Rig without the ability to be driven. That occurs in the middle of nowhere or far enough away from help.
  • Whatever may be the specific event that has occurred, it can happen fast! Your decision in certain situations could require you to act IMMEDIATELY and WITHOUT DELAY.
The event occurring can be classified as Fight or Flight/Life or Death/Evacuation for Survival situation.
Please keep that in mind when making the choice to put together your "Bug Out Bag".
With all this being said:

Would you have the gear, supplies, sustenance, and med kit readily available to be taken with you in a moments notice?
NOTE:

You should be aware that this "Bug out Bag" is simply to get you through the survival of the next 72Hrs or so. This time frame is based on how long it typically takes Emergency Services once deployed to reach people. This is not a fixed location of supplies, food, and resources. This is for mobile use in a type of evacuation, escape, and survival situation kept in a single or few containers such as Backpacks and MOLE Bags.

Keep in mind these are things you probably take on your trips, however this bag is meant to have these items in it at all times to be prepared for such cases.
BUG OUT BAG (TYPICAL CONTENTS):
Before we get into specifics/recommendations for contents to be included in your B.O.B.
There are 5 key categories you should consider when putting together a B.O.B.

  • Food/Water
  • First Aid
  • Self Defense Protection
  • Shelter
  • Clothing
  1. First and Foremost Non-perishable food (examples: MRE's, dried fruit, crackers, CLIF bars, Mountain House Freeze Dried Food, Canned Goods, Dehydrated Foods) and water for 72HRS. You should pack 2 liters of water per person per day. This is 6 liters of water per person for 3 DAYS. Also a means of water purification is a good item to have. Since your water will be in storage for considerable amounts of time, use Long term water storage additive. However after a considerable period of time swap out the water and repeat the process)
  2. A Disaster/Survival Guide because not everyone remembers everything, or has had training in survival situations so a guide will do you well to have.
  3. First Aid Kit [Next to sustenance, it is very important that you have this item. Do not skimp on your selection] North American Rescue is a great and highly reliable medical source for these items.
  4. Maps of the area you live in (FOR END OF THE WORLD, BAD DAY SITUATION), and situational maps of the areas you will be traveling to. This should include a compass.
  5. A means of defending yourself, such as a knife/machete, bear mace, nightstick/baton.
    • For Those of you who will say a Gun, I agree but remember not every state lets you carry a handgun concealed, plus you don't want to leave your firearm unsupervised in your Bug Out Bag in the Rig all the time. You should keep your firearm either in a safe , on your person (for those of you who have a CCW in an area/state that authorizes it.) or close by in your Rig while you are traveling in it.
  6. Flashlights (to include extra batteries)
  7. Fire Starter and or Weather Proof Matches
  8. Emergency Whistle
  9. Battery or Crank-operated Radio
  10. Handheld Communications if desired.
  11. Extra Socks and underclothing to include breathable Rain jackets or emergency poncho. This is at a minimum for clothing. If you feel the need to be more prepared pack hiking boots/shoes and a set of clothes for warm and cold weather.
  12. Small Hatchet and or Folding Saw to use for collecting wood for a fire.
  13. Tampons (For Females) [Not to be used to clot/stuff Bullet puncture wounds]
  14. Hand Sanitizer and Baby Wipes
  15. Wipes for bathroom use.
  16. Waste Bag
  17. Flares/Glowsticks/Flare Gun
  18. Multi-tool (such as a Gerber or Leatherman)
  19. A means of creating shelter: some form a lightweight tarp to keep the rain and elements off you whilst you sleep. If you want to spend the extra money we recommend an ENO hammock to keep you off the ground. They are super lightweight and roll up into a small ball, a must especially in this type of situation.
  20. 200ft. of Paracord (For assisting in hanging your tarp for shelter.)
  21. Diapers & Wipes (If you have children that still wear them this is a must.)
  22. Prescription Medicine (If you or a family member have a medical condition requiring medicine which does not need to be refrigerated. Consider keeping 72HRS of this medicine in your B.O.B.)
  23. Mechanix's Gloves and or Leather Gloves
  24. Binoculars (there may be times you will need help visually identifying structures the naked eye might not see that could bring you help and or save you.)
  25. Rite in the Rain Pen & Paper/Roll of Streamer material to mark your path ( The Paper is for leaving Messages to assist in finding you, should you think you have become seriously lost).
  26. Sunglasses
  27. Climbing Rope to include Carabiners that are actually meant for holding the weight of a full grown person. (In the unfortunate case you should need to rappel/climb down a cliff or steep embankment. Please if you are going to take this item have an understanding or receive training on how to properly use this tool to your advantage, so as not to make your situation worse).
  28. Last but not least Handheld GPS! (If you do not have a handheld GPS, you can use as we have shown a Garmin GPS meant for a vehicle powered by a battery pack will more than suffice. However you should have an actual handheld GPS)
CONCLUSION:

At this point you may be thinking to yourself "Man that is a lot of stuff! How can I fit all that into a backpack?" If you take the time to properly pack these items, storage in one or two backpacks is more than do-able.

When choosing items to purchase for your bag, consider lightweight components. Most of the items listed above do not particularly weigh that much but together they do add up. The extra weight over time can weigh on you, but remember this is about survival for 72HRS. The will power of your mind can either be your best friend or your worst enemy.

Stay positive and set obtainable goals to keep you on track so that you will make it out/stay alive!

Just remember there is no such thing as "The Perfect B.O.B." it is situationally based.

Simply keep in mind the 5 Key Categories we previously listed when choosing what should go in your B.O.B.

GO PREPARED!

After setting out our B.O.B. we realized we ourselves were missing several items we mentioned above. This is a prime example to regularly check your inventory at least every quarter of the year. Another deficiency (in our opinion) we realized is that we want to upgrade our bag to one with a little more volume. Also please note that you can more than easily stow all this gear into 2 separate backpacks to help share the load among your family or friends if you are not traveling solo.

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I love this! Thank you.
 

Kyle & Kari Frink

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@systemdelete you bring up a really good and important point, weight must be a consideration when going mobile.
I'm always looking to improve the items in my BOB and this is a great post to fine-tune some of those things, add some, consolidate, etc.

That said, to pack for a known trip for a fixed distance and time period on known terrain is very different than making a BOB. Some similarities and items for sure but a very different end-goal.

Thanks @Kyle & Kari Frink for this list, and others for the feedback, this is a great way to come up with what works best for me and my situation.
I have a special needs adult daughter that would be pretty much incapable of carrying even 20 lbs in a backpack, so there's a big consideration for me and my wife.



Thanks and keep the feedback coming!

Dan.
Thanks for the time taken to add valuable inputs to the discussion. You are right about your daughter that is also something to consider and not to take lightly. Will put some thought into it for you guys!
 

Tupenny

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You are totally right about distance versus weight.

If I had to gander I would say 50lbs total for everything shown, never thought to weigh them. Now I'm curious...

Also to add more info, the wife's pack is the same just a different color than mine and splits the lighter items/food along with her clothes and our children's clothes. As for the shelter hammock. Ours is a double nest meant for two adults. Yes not very comfy but survival isn't so I imagine we would just sleep with our two little ones till they get bigger for warmth and peace of mind "security".

As I clearly stated multiple times in the article every B.O.B. is different for every situation. With the exception of missing items also mentioned, our packs are a little over prepared and under prepared as some might think.

Another "life choice" most don't make is exercise (real good exercise, not just walking lol) and I mean doing cardio on a regular basis along with weight training. Mixed with actually hiking/biking/running. Whatever your fancy of cardio, this will greatly increase your chances of survival not just "oh hey I have all this stuff and some variation of survival training."

Also refer to the conclusion section near the end where it talks about taking the lightweight route and options and references what you have said.

Thanks for the input!
Great point. Most of my family, for 3 generations, is military: army/navy. The one consistent message they had to survive was to stay physically fit. My grandfather carried a 45# pack, my uncle 55# and my brother was carrying up to 80# ! They had everything they could ever need in their situation, however without being physically capable, nothing else matters.

Take care of yourselves Overlanders. Stay smart, stay fit, stay alive.
 

T.Shack

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Great point. Most of my family, for 3 generations, is military: army/navy. The one consistent message they had to survive was to stay physically fit. My grandfather carried a 45# pack, my uncle 55# and my brother was carrying up to 80# ! They had everything they could ever need in their situation, however without being physically capable, nothing else matters.

Take care of yourselves Overlanders. Stay smart, stay fit, stay alive.
That last statement is a critical one!
 

Roam_CO85

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I carry a get home bag pretty much anywhere I go. If i am more than 40 miles from home i use a 72 hour bag and it just amplifies my day bag. Day bag consists of water,food, fire med, protection. I work 25 miles from my house and know it would take me 8 hours roughly to get home. Carry enough water to get me through a day plus ways of cleaning water. Enough energy bars and a meal bar that I could get through a day of living on just that. Ways to making fire and a trama kit and a small bobo kit. Carry 3 spare loaded mags for my ccw. Also carry a map of secondary roads routes marked to fallow. Where i live its crazy to think but if we where in a grid lock situation my first move is to get home to my family.. at all costs! If the main roads are wiped out. Life would suck. Few years ago had a big flood that closes every bridge in a 100 mile radius it pretty much closed every road in the area down. Out on the trail. I carry a 72 hour bag. Which if i am stuck and have to find help or what ever the case. I know i can survive 72 hours out of that bag. Most places i go, i know i am not more than a days hike out of. But any over night travel i log that as two days and need more logistics specially in the winter when I do alot of stuff alone. More water. More fire more food more medical. Carry a rifle along with my ccw.

Bugging out as always been surreal to me. Cus all the prepping ive done. Everything is at home. The old lady knows if anything happens to get home. If she doesnt get home. My job is to help her get home. The what ifs are hugely important
 
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Ghost

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Read a book called “One Second After” it will change the way you think about survival forever. Bugging out is not an option for me. I highly recommend this book.

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If you liked One Second after you should look into the "Going Home" series. I Audio Book and podcast on my daily backcountry commute and have gone through just under 100 books of this genre over the past 12 years.
 
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RoarinRow

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Wow I thought I was a prepper. You got it down! I will re-evaluate my list and my B.O.B.

On a side note I also picked up an EMP Shield device to protect my rig, just in case. I want to be able to bug out with a working vehicle.
 

Jim SoG

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Great write up, thank you......

Wifes pack is to heavy for her but I explained she will dump out the items she dont need to get home or to me and I provided a fold up alum dolly type cart, not the best solution but for her it works, even in dirt and she knows if she cant diddy, she is to shelter in safety and I will come get her.....Living in Arizona I have had to hike out of the mtns in the desert after a break down, sure regretted not being in better shape!

No matter what you got or dont got, start, anything is better than nothing....

I re figure my pack all the time, like I had a surgical kit for a long time, now it is vehicle based not in my pack, things like that.

Jim
 
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Ghost

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Living in a Gorge we are landlocked with ansingle two lane road passing through our small town. With heavy snows every winter and fires common in summer 72 hour bags are a must in all our vehicles. My wife and I head 20 miles in opposite directions to work everyday. These bags are more”get home bags” than BOBs but function the same. During fire season we are always prepared to bug out and along with outrBags have documents and some valuables ready to load and go quickly. In winter we are stocked and have food, fuel, and generator prepared to grind out the power outages and road closure that happens every year.
 
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