Animal Encounters

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Claymore F.T.E.

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Orange Beach, AL
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Had a bobcat stalk me for a while. Was on a hike and my dog was going nuts for about a mile. Couldn't figure out what her deal was til she finally went ape shit on flushed the bugger out from behind a rock wall. Glad that cat left us alone after that or i would have lost a dog that day. I mean, my little lab was tough but not bobcat tough.
This sounds nuts, but my friend was attacked by a bobcat. He was turkey hunting here in MS and called in more than a gobbler. Before he knew it the cat was in the bush with him and on his back. It must have realized my friend wasn't a hen, and ran the other way.

OB#7439
 

MA_Trooper

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This sounds nuts, but my friend was attacked by a bobcat. He was turkey hunting here in MS and called in more than a gobbler. Before he knew it the cat was in the bush with him and on his back. It must have realized my friend wasn't a hen, and ran the other way.

OB#7439
Woah, that is nuts. Yeah, Bobcats can be terrifying. I was on edge the remainder of my trip.
 

Jeepney

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1,212
MN
dispersed caming in SD Badlands, a bull wasn't too happy to find that we are on his path to his watering hole.

My buddy got really worried about it and told his kids to get off my RTT for fear of the bull toppling my Jeep. Kept my kids up there and let the bull pass thru.
 

professorkx

Rank IV

Traveler I

In the last three years, we have come across Black Bear, Moose, Elk, Coyote, cougar, buffalo and less dangerous animals like deer, rabbit, etc, many strolling through camp. I'm always armed with either a 1911 or a 44 mag in a chest rig, as well as an AR and Mossberg tactical with slugs in the Jeep, and only the Mossberg when I'm on the dual sport motorcycle.

My wife and I like to see wildlife, and the deal is if they leave me alone, I leave them alone. I always give them plenty of room unless we stumble on each other, in which case I yield my position to the animal. But, I won't be harassed by any animal, two or four legged. At over 6'4", 225 lbs and fit, I'm a big presence with a bad attitude when I'm bothered.
 

professorkx

Rank IV

Traveler I

You can't believe how fast a black bear can cover ground, and even bigger grizzlies cover ground fast. If you need a gun and it's not on your person, you probably won't have time to get to it. A Chest rig is the best carry option when in bear country, but it's useless unless you practice drawing and firing at a target that's moving towards you.

To practice hitting a target that's coming towards you, I use a running man drill that can be practiced at most ranges. Target at 20 feet, pistol at low ready and have a friend pull and hold the switch bringing the target towards you as fast as the motor will run. Shooter raises weapon to engage the target 5 times before it touches the barrel. You would be surprised the number of experienced shooters who miss 50% when the target is coming towards them the first time I run this drill with them. With practice, you can hit 100% in the A range, which is what it would take to have chance against a charging bear.
 

Batmango66

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Indiana 930, New Haven, IN, USA
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Hit a porcupine in the U.P. Of Michigan one night, in our car (a porcupine quill is an amazing tire flattening device.) on the same road that we were pretty excited to see a black bear earlier that day. I know black bears aren’t too aggressive and would likely avoid any contact. We just made LOTS of noise and was probably nearing formula one tire changing speed. Weren’t overly worried but it was still spooky.


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Overland USA

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Rolling Meadows, IL
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Although I have never personally encountered an animal, face to face, I have had them rummaging through my camp at night. Tearing up trash, hiding things from you, and destroying our food containers(if it was left out). My question is, who has encountered an animal, in any situation, and what is/are the best things to do? By animal, I mean a larger predator than we are, wolf, or mountain lion.

Any personal experiences?

I would like to know some tips.
When I was scout a bear wandered into our camp at night. We just hid in our tents.
 
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I love hunting bear & have been for 30 plus yrs. We (Sally & I) disperse camp always in deep bear country. What I found IMO about camping in the wilderness is wildlife in general, especially black bears. Black bears are attracted to many things that campers do irresponsibly. Spring time I run into areas that had dispersed camping & trash is left behind by the pervious campers. Right their just sends a signal food & future food source. Remember spring time bears come out of hibernation, adult male bears (boars) are first to emerge then mothers (sows) with her cubs come next.
The only thing that is on a bears mind is food, I found with my experience as a bear hunter & die heart disperse camper is people are the problem aka campers do not consider what brings bears to your camp site. Like I said bears are not the problem, people are, & what they lack in knowledge & common sense is food, garbage as of proper storage, proper disposal of trash & uneaten food.
Here's something to ponder on......you ever smelled a day after beer bottle? seriously IMO not a pleasant smell, a bear up wind will catch that scent in a heart beat. A bears nose & smell is so acute that they can detect animal carcasses upwind from anywhere 15 miles to 20 miles away.
Another attractant to bears is undone (unwashed) dishes left out during the night all night until morning, as well as dirty dish water dumped too close to camp. Bears are nocturnal & usually forage by night but can be seen @ day light hours feeding too.
Bears are naturally afraid of humans, but may become accustom to people by their lack of bear proof knowledge, stupidity & their poor camping behaviors. This is why some bears will become nuisance animals & will have to be relocated or even dispatched. IMO "I" feel too many unseasoned amateur campers cause the problem for other more experienced & bear worthy campers who like to camp in good bear country. These same types of campers that have the attitude "I" know it all mentality when in reality they know nothing & are the ones who cause the bears to become problematic. You do not feed wildlife, & shouldn't leave your camp site vulnerable or unattended either in wilderness. This why these people have the problems in deep wilderness camping.
When Sally & I disperse camp in bear country (Wilderness Areas, National Forest) we take a 12ga. security pump shotgun with non lethal shotshells (rubber slugs). These are good out to 30 yards, that is when I will take the shot if need be. Anything closer will cause serious injury to the bear. These will not cycle a semi auto shotguns.
 
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Jku Ben

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Will never forget the mountain lion that peed all over my tent on a backpacking trip in the mountains of San Diego ( cuyamacas ) & remember hearing him purring as he was peeing. & omg what a stench. Was solo & 17 yrs old & prayed to god that night. Ha ha. But seriously it was a long night.
 
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1derer

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I have seen and dealt with many animals on the trail all experiences were trivial, scare away a black bear, raccoons, deer, elk, etc...

Only animal that I have ever had serious problems with are people. Been at gun point once, braninished twice on BLM land. I have found the key is to be respectful, knowledgable about location but not necessarily compliant. I found if you are too agreeable demands get more and more unreasonable.
 
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avgjoe624

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MOST animals will simply walk away if they see you around unless they feel threatened. Ive had TONS of experience with bears, raccoon, coyotes, bobcats, mountain lions, and a freakin panther once. 9 times out of 10 if you just make some noise itll spook off. but always make sure you have shelter in some way shape or form the the more fearless ones. In all of my time in the woods, what usually ends up worrying me the most are rattlesnakes and copperheads.
 
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tacoclifford

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So I had a close encounter with an animal and probably did the absolute wrong thing. I friended it and shared some of my dinner with my fox buddy. The whole family stuck around and greeted me in the morning
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4wheelspulling

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I lived and hiked a lot around Lola, Montana. Most Grizzlies will go the other way when they see you. Black Bears are unpredictable along with big cats! Studies by the University of Montana, and the US forest service, have tracked attacks by Grizzly and Black Bear, gave the following information. Use bells and make lots of noise in Bear country. Raise your arms, and back away slowly when seeing an animal. It is normal for all bears to do a fake charge, trying to scare you away! Next line of defense if it looks like you are in danger is this, Grizzly Bear spray, was far more effective against attacking animals than handguns! Buy the time you know an animal is going to really attack you, even experienced handgun hunters were not able to stop the attack. Grizzly Bear spray, did stop the attack and was faster and easier to use! Not the cheap stuff, but real Grizzly Bear spray. I was surprised by the findings. I consider myself an excellent shot and proficient with the use of a firearm. I know stores like Sportsman, carry the good spray! At around $50. A can, it’s not cheap but ? Vance.
 

chuckoverland

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I lived and hiked a lot around Lola, Montana. Most Grizzlies will go the other way when they see you. Black Bears are unpredictable along with big cats! Studies by the University of Montana, and the US forest service, have tracked attacks by Grizzly and Black Bear, gave the following information. Use bells and make lots of noise in Bear country. Raise your arms, and back away slowly when seeing an animal. It is normal for all bears to do a fake charge, trying to scare you away! Next line of defense if it looks like you are in danger is this, Grizzly Bear spray, was far more effective against attacking animals than handguns! Buy the time you know an animal is going to really attack you, even experienced handgun hunters were not able to stop the attack. Grizzly Bear spray, did stop the attack and was faster and easier to use! Not the cheap stuff, but real Grizzly Bear spray. I was surprised by the findings. I consider myself an excellent shot and proficient with the use of a firearm. I know stores like Sportsman, carry the good spray! At around $50. A can, it’s not cheap but ? Vance.
Bears nasal cavity is the most sensitive part of their nervous system. A strong enough odor can kill them from sensory overload. If they can smell prey from 10 miles away imagine what a blast of pepper spray will do.
 
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