Wild Camping in Scandinavia.

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Some interesting info here guys, thank you for sharing.

Will be considering the possibility of wild camping in our Scandinavia trip in 2020.

If we do wild camp, it'll be for one night only at at time, either because we like the look of the area and there aren't any campsites locally, or because we've been forced to stop for mechanical reasons.

Am I correct in the translation of "allemänsrätt" to mean "Freedom to Roam".
Equal rights to venture wild nature for all ....

Pictures taken at Unstad/Lofoten







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Yngve

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Say, mr. Man, aren't those lovely surfer pictures from Lofoten from some article ? The girl is stunning, btw - at times like this I remember that I'm single.

OK, the Swedes have an 24 hrs Allemannsrett while the Norwegian Magnus Lagaboete-based law refined in the 50's state we have two nights and 3 days here in Norway. The Finns likewize and the Danes not but then again they have public access on some of their beaches.
Like others have stated previously, Free Camping is an accepted thing but under certain demands. Public land okay, private property only bu land owners accept. No littering (as the Wild Campers do) and leave nothing but footprints.

How about the Faeroe islands, and say - Iceland ?
 
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PeterC

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Wild Camping in Sweden.

In generall it is the same as in Norway. Maybe even less rules. Not sure of it. But if you keep the rules from Norway in mind you will be allright.

Good stuff here in this thread guys!
I don't know much about Finland, Norway or Denmark but Sweden is my home country so I will try to add some.

Allemansrätten allows you too sleep one night almost anywhere. Even on private property as long as you are out of sight from the owners home. Also of course do not go into farmers fields. You are not allowed to leave anything behind. No marks from fires, no broken bushes no nothing. You are allowed to take firewood from the ground but not from standing trees. You are allowed to pick berries and mushrooms. You are also allowed to make a fire if the fire does not leave ANY marks behind AND if there are no anti fire laws at the time of your visit. Check here for general information Startpage
 
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PeterC

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sounds good. it goes without saying to show respect to nature and other individuals. I'm really looking forward to our wild camping days in norway in early august ..


that doesn't sound that good however. do I really need to 'hide' not to attract any attention of bypassers?

In Sweden there is no reason what so ever to hide. Private property or not the rules are exactly the same. Except on private land you are not allowed to be visible from the owners home.
 

PeterC

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One thing to add in here, Norwegian law on offroading is strict. The wording in the law is something along the lines of you are only allowed to use roads that "normal" cars can use, not listing what a normal car is.
But my interpretation on that as long as the road dont have a private sign, closed gate and you can drive it with out using 4low it is good to go. But I am sure other Norwegian members dont agree on that ;)
Same thing applies in Sweden. Driving off the road is 100% illegal. Unless it's your own land and you have things you have to do with the help of a vehicle. Roads are all roads that are registered. No matter if they are paved or not. So tracks and gravel roads etc it's all fine as long as the are not marked as private.
 
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PeterC

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Motorized overlanders or RV's have stricter guidelines as those vehicles fall also under the offroad vehicle laws. The law states "there is no right of public access for motorized vehicles" If you for example drive onto a grassy meadow and camp, you can be penalized if reported to the police. Even driving private roads is not permitted, but if its not marked with a private road sign then you can pass.

It is strict in the Nordic's and confusing sometimes but as it has been mentioned before if your unseen and leave no signs of your stay, then you'll be fine.

An example that I can give from last summer was the 7 nights that we spent on Gotland. At one beach a man walking his dog came up to us and tried to run us off "his" beach even though we were parked in an accepted parking area. Once I clearly showed him on the gps and local terrain maps where we were and rights that we had he changed his tune. BUT afterwards we felt un welcomed and uncomfortable therefore left. A half hour later we found an empty beach that we had to ourselves.

Quite and peaceful, an excellent nights camp.

View attachment 52376
No matter where you are and no matter if you are following the rules or not there will be people with their own opinions. They are nothing but yet another reason to try to stay low key in nature.
 

Yngve

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Free camping is apreciated, the litter spreading wild camping is not.

(Anyone find you dumping your shit on Common Ground; be prepared to take a beating - not to mention on Private land)

The law is not from 1957, yet well done finding the Outdoors Act (Friluftsloven) - the law is one of King Magnus VI Lagaboete’s, he died in 1280.
 

Todd Jackson

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Did you guys go to Gotland? How was it?
Jupp. :sunglasses:
Gotland is always fun with this time driving as much as we could on the "bike route" around the island. It gave us the opportunity to drive a lot of smaller roads in the farming areas and forests along the coastline. We found some great camping spots along the way. Ate lots of smoked salmon and lamb, both which Gotland is famous for. We even found a small farm where they made their own chocolate! Of course we had to turn in and buy 2 of everything......yes it was good, really good! LOL
 
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