Why are there so few Silverado overland rigs?

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Tim Roberts

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Using a full size rig has its drawbacks because of width, not articulated length. A big wide vehicle is much less maneuverable, oftentimes impossible to maneuver, on tight narrow trails that a narrower vehicle, even with a trailer can easily traverse.. geometry and spacial intellect are not idiotic premises.
You know what, every rig has draw backs depending on what you want to use it for. I love jeeps but you sure have to stuff them full of stuff and not great for towing boat or larger trailers. As mentioned before, larger rigs like my Silverado are not great for rock climbing or on narrow trails. All depends on what you want and everything is a compromise! Love my Silverado and all the space and power and it loves going cross country camping or Overlanding! It’s all good guys, love your ride and enjoy!
 

MOAK

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You know what, every rig has draw backs depending on what you want to use it for. I love jeeps but you sure have to stuff them full of stuff and not great for towing boat or larger trailers. As mentioned before, larger rigs like my Silverado are not great for rock climbing or on narrow trails. All depends on what you want and everything is a compromise! Love my Silverado and all the space and power and it loves going cross country camping or Overlanding! It’s all good guys, love your ride and enjoy!
Agreed 100%, my remark was intended to nullify the “idiotic” comment previously posted.
 

MOAK

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GM does not have to do a copy of the Ford Raptor. They instead need to do as RAM did, separate from the Power Wagon. They need to at least offer some 'ala-carte' off road parts thru their parts department. While RAM/FIAT does not offer the full package, they offer upgrades not seen on the standard OEM offerings.

If GM did this business model, they would go a long way towards offering a competitive product. A Raptor has a lot of parts separate from standard F Series trucks. It would be much cheaper to offer things like.....bash plates, transmission SKID PLATES, fuel tank skid plates, etc, over a separate truck offering.

Toyota offers both a plastic, and a steel fuel tank skid, depending on the trim level.
My old 1985 F-150 4x4 with the basic 6 cyl. Engine came with a steel fuel tank skid. It also had that standard frame rail to frame rail skid plate as seen under the trucks and Broncos.

Offer the rear shock skids as the Colorado does for those who travel in rocks. Not everyone needs them but some owners would appreciate the option.
I had an 86 f150 4x4, three speed with creeper, bare bones, rubber floor mats, bench seat,, that thing was a beast..
 

Billiebob

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Chev, Ford, Dodge cater to 3 distinct markets and buyers for each have different needs or desires. The Chev is not common overlanding because guys who buy them aren't interested in overlanding. But also Chevs cater to a more urban buyer. Fords rep is for work truck tough. Dodge.... rides on the engines rep, Cummins or Hemi. All 3 are similar but overlanders just aren't focused on a cushy Chevy with lots of bling.

The big difference tho..... Chevy has been doing the independent front suspension for 30 years. But you can still buy a Ford or Dodge with solid axles and solid axles are bulletproof by comparison. In the oilfield, we'd rebuild a Chevy front end after 2 years. We never rebuilt a Ford. And Dodges were as tough as the Fords. Chevy went luxury. Ford stayed the Ford Tough route. Dodge stuck to their roots with 60 years of horse power heritage.
 

Anak

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Chev, Ford, Dodge cater to 3 distinct markets and buyers for each have different needs or desires. The Chev is not common overlanding because guys who buy them aren't interested in overlanding. But also Chevs cater to a more urban buyer. Fords rep is for work truck tough. Dodge.... rides on the engines rep, Cummins or Hemi. All 3 are similar but overlanders just aren't focused on a cushy Chevy with lots of bling.

The big difference tho..... Chevy has been doing the independent front suspension for 30 years. But you can still buy a Ford or Dodge with solid axles and solid axles are bulletproof by comparison. In the oilfield, we'd rebuild a Chevy front end after 2 years. We never rebuilt a Ford. And Dodges were as tough as the Fords. Chevy went luxury. Ford stayed the Ford Tough route. Dodge stuck to their roots with 60 years of horse power heritage.
I agree.

But, explain Toyota.
 

Billiebob

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I agree.

But, explain Toyota.
Honda, 1980. Toyota,1990. Hyundai, 2000. Kia, 2010.... understand ?
If you value reliability, maintenance costs, warranty service with out an arguement. These are the leaders.
But if you are a "Made in America" fan boy like me..... you pretend it is not so.
 

Tim Roberts

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Honda, 1980. Toyota,1990. Hyundai, 2000. Kia, 2010.... understand ?
If you value reliability, maintenance costs, warranty service with out an arguement. These are the leaders.
But if you are a "Made in America" fan boy like me..... you pretend it is not so.
I’m getting into this conversation a little late but my 1994 Jeep Cherokee went 435,000 miles on the original engine and trans with very little maintenance, my Tahoe after that went 250,000 miles all original equipment no problems and I never had to do breaks and my current Silverado is at 60,000 with not a single issue. If you do normal fluid changes ect., I think American made can stand with the other rides out there!
 

MOAK

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I’m getting into this conversation a little late but my 1994 Jeep Cherokee went 435,000 miles on the original engine and trans with very little maintenance, my Tahoe after that went 250,000 miles all original equipment no problems and I never had to do breaks and my current Silverado is at 60,000 with not a single issue. If you do normal fluid changes ect., I think American made can stand with the other rides out there!
Until you start bashing the crap out of em off pavement. Toyota’s, like it or not, are way overbuilt and can take the beating.. ever notice that with American made rigs when something breaks it is always highly recommended to “ upgrade”? Japanese rigs, be it Toyota, Nissan, or Mitsubishi the overwhelming consensus is to keep it OEM. Example? Suspension bushings in every Jeep I ever owned needed replaced and upgraded between 50 and 75 k miles.. Toyota bushings have nearly 3 times that lifespan.. Full float axles? No contest.
 
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Tim Roberts

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Until you start bashing the crap out of em off pavement. Toyota’s, like it or not, are way overbuilt and can take the beating.. ever notice that with American made rigs when something breaks it is always highly recommended to “ upgrade”? Japanese rigs, be it Toyota, Nissan, or Mitsubishi the overwhelming consensus is to keep it OEM. Example? Suspension bushings in every Jeep I ever owned needed replaced and upgraded between 50 and 75 k miles.. Toyota bushings have nearly 3 times that lifespan.. Full float axles? No contest.
I’m sure you are correct under those conditions. I don’t bash mine up and if I did, I see your point!
 
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Kevin108

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Using a full size rig has its drawbacks because of width, not articulated length. A big wide vehicle is much less maneuverable, oftentimes impossible to maneuver, on tight narrow trails that a narrower vehicle, even with a trailer can easily traverse.. geometry and spacial intellect are not idiotic premises.
I see you didn't bother to actually look at the measurements of the vehicles I named. You didn't disagree with any of my facts, just stated other information we both generally agree on. What did I disagree about? I think a single long rig is typically easier to find a line for, and certainly easier to reverse, than a shorter rig with a trailer.

Addressing my original statement, I wrote that the most commonly used offroad rigs now are basically the same dimensions of older popular models long-since referred to as fullsize. Depending on which two you compare, there's only an additional 2-3 inches on each side of the vehicle. Pulling into your garage, you might feel it. On the trail, you'll never notice it. I stand by my statement: virtually everything is "fullsize" now.

Jeep JKU
74x188

FJ Cruiser
75x184

4Runner
76x191

Ford Bronco
79x184

K5 Blazer
80x185

Ramcharger
80x189

* Measurements were generally read quickly from Google results and may not be as accurate as possible.
 

Billiebob

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Jeep TJ body,
60x144

plus 2-3 inches per side for the plastic flares.
Those dimensions above are the main reason I still drive a TJ.

I definitely notice it on my trails which are all thru forests.

Just because everything is bigger today does not mean the older, smaller rigs are without advantages.
I'd love to find one of these to overland.

blue9.jpg
 
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Kevin108

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Jeep TJ body,
60x144

plus 2-3 inches per side for the plastic flares.
Main reason I still drive a TJ.

I definitely notice it on my trails which are all thru forests.

Just because everything is bigger today does not mean the older, smaller rigs are without advantages.
I'd love to find one of these to overland.

View attachment 100180
The YJ/XJ/TJ, S-10/Blazer, and Ranger/Bronco II were precisely what I was thinking of when deciding that everything is full-size now.
 

Tim Roberts

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Which is why you love that Tahoe and Silverado. They are built to be cushy. Just don't push the envelope.
When I transitioned from my Cherokee to the Tahoe, it was quite a change! Loved that Jeep but the comfort built into the Tahoe was nice! The Silverado is my comfortable ride now but, it goes off road and handles it nice!
 

MOAK

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I see you didn't bother to actually look at the measurements of the vehicles I named. You didn't disagree with any of my facts, just stated other information we both generally agree on. What did I disagree about? I think a single long rig is typically easier to find a line for, and certainly easier to reverse, than a shorter rig with a trailer.

Addressing my original statement, I wrote that the most commonly used offroad rigs now are basically the same dimensions of older popular models long-since referred to as fullsize. Depending on which two you compare, there's only an additional 2-3 inches on each side of the vehicle. Pulling into your garage, you might feel it. On the trail, you'll never notice it. I stand by my statement: virtually everything is "fullsize" now.

Jeep JKU
74x188

FJ Cruiser
75x184

4Runner
76x191

Ford Bronco
79x184

K5 Blazer
80x185

Ramcharger
80x189

* Measurements were generally read quickly from Google results and may not be as accurate as possible.
The only thing I disagreed with you about was your use of language, referring to a thought process as being idiotic. Personally, I'd rather drag a trailer around behind me than drive a full size rig. My rig is, in all reality, a medium sized vehicle, even though we scale out at 7,000 lbs and another 1,000 lbs of trailer. 30 years ago I toyed with the idea of building out my F150 into a long distance overlanding rig. It was simply too wide, too long and more than a bit on the clumsy side to traverse the narrow trails of the north eastern US and Canada, ( otherwise known as the Great North Woods.) That's just my personal opinion based upon about 40 years of doing this thing we all love to do. I certainly do not refer to anyone else's opinions or justifications as being idiotic.
 
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Anak

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I have to say that a few inches makes a big difference on the trails I run. Many of the places I have taken my XJ are simply impossible to even consider for my Suburban.

One of the groups I wheel with used to be mostly XJs, now they have moved on to JKUs. One of the couples has gone for more luxury and gotten a Sportsmobile. They have done a noble job of trying not to be a problem, but there have been some places they just can't go. It is a width issue. Rocks just aren't very forgiving.

I will note that these trails are old desert mining trails. No one wanted to cut/blast out any more rock than they had to in order to make these trails. Other parts of the country may be substantially different.
 
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