What's your latest camping gear purchase, and what caused you to buy it?

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reaver

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Brian
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McGahuey
As the title suggests, I'm looking to start a discussion about purchasing camping gear, and the reasoning behind it. I figure this might help other news like myself think about what they're buying and why, and possibly give folks ideas on how they can further streamline their setup.

I'll start us off.

I've been camping for a VERY long time, and have lots of old hand me down gear. Most of it works fine (barring a tent that had a tree land on it while I was still in it, but that's a story for another day). Much of it however is old, bulky, heavy, or just plain doesn't pack well or work all that well.

So, I've purchased the following:

Coleman fold and go grill:
Purchased because I can't seem to get the hang of Charcoal, and it's small, and doubles as a stove and griddle as well.

Lifetime 55 quart cooler:
I was using a 35qt coleman cooler that was both too small for my family for anything more that one night, and could barely hold ice more than two days. Needed something bigger and better. If I do any trips longer than 5 days, I'll buy a fridge.

Upcoming purchases
Coleman 4 person instant tent:
I have a tent that has no rainfly, and a hole in the floor, a backpacking tent that is a pain to setup, and another dome tent that is even more of a pain to set up. I want something that sets up quickly, is waterproof without a rain fly (I'm buying one, but want to not have water get in during setup) and can hold the dog and I. This fits the bill. I plan on buying the 8 person for the family in the spring.

Single burner butane/propane stove.
I have a large 3 burner propane stove that works great. It's also bulky and totally overkill when it's just me. I want something that is small, and with the grill, figure this will fit nicely.

Compact camp chair
My chair is reaching the end of its life. It's also bulky. I figured it's time to replace it, and am going with a small chair that takes up way less space when packed.

Lightspeed outdoors 3" sleeping pad

I've been using a large, bulky twin air mattress. It traps no heat, and the last time I camped in the Nevada desert, I was cold all night. With an r8.9 rating, this should do the job.

That's my list for now. It's ever-evolving, and I'm sure it will be added to as I refine my setup.

I'd love to hear from others as well.
 
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Dr Gil

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Traveler I

My latest purchase is the Zodi Extreme SC pump shower (Again). I had one of these 2 years ago. I thought I would upgrade to the Ecotemp L5 with the 12 volt pump and mini palm sized 12 volt battery. It turned out to be less than stellar with all the cords, the weight, making sure the battery is charged, and the unreliability of the pilot light staying on in high elevations.

I went back to KISS. Bought the Zodi Extreme again. Back to reliable mechanical hand pump. Works everytime no matter what the elevation. I heat the water in the tank on top of my Iwatani 12K BTU butane stove. Hot shower anywhere I go.
 

reaver

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Brian
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McGahuey
My latest purchase is the Zodi Extreme SC pump shower (Again). I had one of these 2 years ago. I thought I would upgrade to the Ecotemp L5 with the 12 volt pump and mini palm sized 12 volt battery. It turned out to be less than stellar with all the cords, the weight, making sure the battery is charged, and the unreliability of the pilot light staying on in high elevations.

I went back to KISS. Bought the Zodi Extreme again. Back to reliable mechanical hand pump. Works everytime no matter what the elevation. I heat the water in the tank on top of my Iwatani 12K BTU butane stove. Hot shower anywhere I go.
A shower setup is something I'm thinking about in the future, but don't really need yet. Definitely something to consider. This is why I started this thread.
 

reaver

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I use a lp propane tank (20lb atm, but I'm buying a 5lb in the spring), instead. Cheap, refillable, and can run multiple appliances for days off a single tank. Works best for what I do.

Those are great finds though. I've never used white gas, and would definitely be interested in trying it.
 
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natematos

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I went on a ridiculous quest to find some good and simple totes after staring at the Yeti one for an hour at REI. I loved it, but just could not bring myself to drop that kind of money on a tote. It took way longer than I expected to actually find some that worked for what I needed and ended up going with just the classic - Rubbermade Roughneck 10gal Tote.

The Home Depot knockoff doesn't actually stack, and the 'locking' on the handles is incredibly weak. A lot of places carry the larger sizes, but if I wanted them to fit in my roof box I needed the 10gal size. Plus they allow me to keep things more organized. The larger sizes end up just being a catch-all and make things harder to find.
 
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reaver

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I went on a ridiculous quest to find some good and simple totes after staring at the Yeti one for an hour at REI. I loved it, but just could not bring myself to drop that kind of money on a tote. It took way longer than I expected to actually find some that worked for what I needed and ended up going with just the classic - Rubbermade Roughneck 10gal Tote.

The Home Depot knockoff doesn't actually stack, and the 'locking' on the handles is incredibly weak. A lot of places carry the larger sizes, but if I wanted them to fit in my roof box I needed the 10gal size. Plus they allow me to keep things more organized. The larger sizes end up just being a catch-all and make things harder to find.
This is something I need to do as well. Without seeing them, right now I'm leaning towards the Plano lockers. I may make a trip to lowes/home depot/Wal-Mart to compare. I've still not figured out exactly how I want to separate my gear.
 

Pathfinder I

This is something I need to do as well. Without seeing them, right now I'm leaning towards the Plano lockers. I may make a trip to lowes/home depot/Wal-Mart to compare. I've still not figured out exactly how I want to separate my gear.
I've been very pleased with my plano 108qt totes, 2 in the bed and a 56 qt in the rear seat area.
 

Road

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.

Newest camping gear I've bought recently are some of the same backpacker style lanterns I used to use decades ago, these from UCO - with a glass sleeve, 9hr candle and a neoprene cocoon for transporting. I also got boxes of 9hr beeswax, citronella, and white candles to test and compare.
UCO-Lanterns.jpg


Also bought the UCO Pac-Flat reflector shades for these lanterns, which are quite effective at casting a good downlight for stove, table, tailgate, etc. The reflectors come apart into two identical pieces for flat packing.
UCO-pacflat-reflector.png

I now have five of these lanterns and am trying them out around camp instead of battery and solar lights, as they provide a lower Kelvin temp, so much warmer cozier color.

I'll keep a couple in go bags for canoe and bike and overnights.

.
 
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reaver

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I've purchased all the stuff in my initial list. I'll be using it all this weekend, and we'll see how it does.

I've decided I'm going to be purchasing totes next. I've found the Plano ones to be the cheapest at home depot, $25 for the 108qt and 15 for the 56qt. I'll be getting two of each. I'm also thinking about one of the mtm ammo crates for dry food storage.
 

Krej

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6 lb Propane tank with mount. Found one for a sweet deal and the dimensions (taller and thinner) allow me to mount it on the side of a dual jerry can holder on the rear swing.
I basically just hate 1 lb bottles and I added up how many I have purchased in the past 5 years - I will break even in 3 years and my OCD gets to find something else to concern itself with.
 

reaver

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I feel ya. I'm using a 20lb tank right now, but I have room. I plan on getting a 5lb tank in the spring for camping trips. I do still carry one or two 1lb tanks as back up though.
 

Krej

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I feel ya. I'm using a 20lb tank right now, but I have room. I plan on getting a 5lb tank in the spring for camping trips. I do still carry one or two 1lb tanks as back up though.
I contemplated bringing a backup 1 lb but i already keep my JetBoil and a couple of Mountain House meals for emergencies, hot chocolate, and coffee. Figured if something happened to the propane tank I could survive for 24 hours until I found a store.
 
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L2828

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I’ve been buying old Coleman stuff at garage sales, a model 513a heater made in October of 1973, a model 413g stove made in May of 1974, and a model 220f lantern made on August of 1965. I’m replacing my disposable green propane bottle stuff with white gas. I like the old classic stuff anyway!
I collect and restore old white gas coleman lanterns and stoves. Pick them up cheap at yardsales. All,my co-workers and friends know to bring me anything coleman. I have a couple friends that are always on the lookout. The way I hooked them is I gave them an old coleman lantern and they love it. I never sell them. I give them for eagle scout gifts, fathers day gifts, etc.
 

KonzaLander

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I picked up a couple Coleman 220A lanterns and a 443 Stove.

I had quit bringing my Coleman dual fuel lantern because it was big and bulky and started using LED lights. After my last trip, I was fed up with the LED color and searched for a smaller white gas lantern. I stumbled into a 1958 and 1968 220A which are small compact single mantel lanterns. Then I found a rough 443 stove, which is an aluminum (light weight) 3 burner stove. Sure it's bigger than my old 425 2 burner stove, but it is light weight and the lantern fits inside for safe storage/transport. I'm really looking forward to getting these old Coleman's rejuvenated and used on the trail.
 

L2828

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I picked up a couple Coleman 220A lanterns and a 443 Stove.

I had quit bringing my Coleman dual fuel lantern because it was big and bulky and started using LED lights. After my last trip, I was fed up with the LED color and searched for a smaller white gas lantern. I stumbled into a 1958 and 1968 220A which are small compact single mantel lanterns. Then I found a rough 443 stove, which is an aluminum (light weight) 3 burner stove. Sure it's bigger than my old 425 2 burner stove, but it is light weight and the lantern fits inside for safe storage/transport. I'm really looking forward to getting these old Coleman's rejuvenated and used on the trail.
I clean most all the pieces and parts with simple green, let them soak overnight sometimes. Get a good set of pipe cleaners. And have fun!! You can find repair kits, seals, glass

pretty easily online. Or even some Wal Mart and Ace hardware stores, Cabelas if you need something same day.
 

KonzaLander

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I clean most all the pieces and parts with simple green, let them soak overnight sometimes. Get a good set of pipe cleaners. And have fun!! You can find repair kits, seals, glass

pretty easily online. Or even some Wal Mart and Ace hardware stores, Cabelas if you need something same day.
It is amazing that you can still buy every part for the old Coleman's. What's even more astonishing is with a little cleaning they fire up. The '58 is all ready for a Peerless mantel. The '68 was left outside and the fuel valve is frozen even after sitting in PB Blaster for a week. The whole thing is so rusty I need to media blast it and do a little custom restoration. I haven't got to the 443, '63 if I remember right, but it should only need a little aluminum brazing and cleaning :blush:
 
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JButtress

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As the title suggests, I'm looking to start a discussion about purchasing camping gear, and the reasoning behind it. I figure this might help other news like myself think about what they're buying and why, and possibly give folks ideas on how they can further streamline their setup.

I'll start us off.

I've been camping for a VERY long time, and have lots of old hand me down gear. Most of it works fine (barring a tent that had a tree land on it while I was still in it, but that's a story for another day). Much of it however is old, bulky, heavy, or just plain doesn't pack well or work all that well.

So, I've purchased the following:

Coleman fold and go grill:
Purchased because I can't seem to get the hang of Charcoal, and it's small, and doubles as a stove and griddle as well.

Lifetime 55 quart cooler:
I was using a 35qt coleman cooler that was both too small for my family for anything more that one night, and could barely hold ice more than two days. Needed something bigger and better. If I do any trips longer than 5 days, I'll buy a fridge.

Upcoming purchases
Coleman 4 person instant tent:
I have a tent that has no rainfly, and a hole in the floor, a backpacking tent that is a pain to setup, and another dome tent that is even more of a pain to set up. I want something that sets up quickly, is waterproof without a rain fly (I'm buying one, but want to not have water get in during setup) and can hold the dog and I. This fits the bill. I plan on buying the 8 person for the family in the spring.

Single burner butane/propane stove.
I have a large 3 burner propane stove that works great. It's also bulky and totally overkill when it's just me. I want something that is small, and with the grill, figure this will fit nicely.

Compact camp chair
My chair is reaching the end of its life. It's also bulky. I figured it's time to replace it, and am going with a small chair that takes up way less space when packed.

Lightspeed outdoors 3" sleeping pad

I've been using a large, bulky twin air mattress. It traps no heat, and the last time I camped in the Nevada desert, I was cold all night. With an r8.9 rating, this should do the job.

That's my list for now. It's ever-evolving, and I'm sure it will be added to as I refine my setup.

I'd love to hear from others as well.
The Coleman 4 man instant tent is awesome if you're looking for something. 45 seconds to put up and take down. Try to find one on amazon with the older materials as the newer made ones are quite as durable as the old ones. Amazon is good for finding the old ones but still not used