What's your experience with OZTENT RV Series tent(s)?

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OBJK

Rank V
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Advocate II

2,306
Pelham, Alabama 35124
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5808

The Oz tents are popular but that doesn't make them well designed. Huge when bagged, have to get out of bag and go outside to close window flap , what's that about ? They set up fast, ok, what's the hurry? Part of the popularity (IMO) is the price, it screams look at how much I spent. There are threads all over for good ground tents for far less $$.
sorry, it met my requirements...and guess what?? none of them was hey look at how much money I spent.
 

jtranum

Rank I
Member

Contributor II

271
Cleveland, MS
Member #

4702

I've been using an Oz-tent RV3 for about a year now on a regular basis, about 1-2 weekends a month. Some people get confused about tents categories when talking about tents, they compare the oz-tent to backpacking tents and say look how big and heavy it is. The Oz tent is a base camp expedition tent, designed to handle extreme elements for extended periods of time. When packed my Rv-3 is about 6.5 feet long and weighs about 50 pounds, not a big deal when it's going on a roof rack.

Why did I go with an RV-3 when there are smaller options? I have several top of the line backpacking tents like the MSR carbon reflex but when you are traveling by vehicle you have the option to carry larger shelters like an Oz tent. If you go with a canvas RTT like CVT or Tepui you are added over 150lbs minimum to the highest point of your vehicle and a canvas RTT does not pack down slim line for aerodynamics, it's just a big square on your roof. The Oz-tent packs down long and skinny on your roof rack to where you hardly feel any drag or mpg loss from it. Secondly is cost; Oz-tent $1000, canvas RTT $2,000+. The third factor in my buying decision was ability to move vehicle to vehicle. I have 4 different vehicles I camp out of, the Oz-tent isn't married to one vehicle, it's just strapped to the roof rack of whatever vehicle I'm taking that weekend. The final factor was ease of setup. The 30 second setup claim is true, except they don't factor in anchor time in the time claim. I can have my RV-3 off the roof rack and completely setup in 5 minutes or less.

So far I have about 50 nights in it and I don't have a single complaint.


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Scott Murray

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Pathfinder I

1,798
Australind WA, Australia
First Name
Scott
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Murray
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3880

I have had one for 10 years and only just replaced it, I think that was $$$'s well spent and I do not really look after my gear that well.

This is it back in 2008

FB_IMG_1504719342954 by Scott Murray, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1504719128178 by Scott Murray, on Flickr

And then loaning it to a mate who did not know how to set it up breaking a hinge.
I could buy a replacement hinge for around $20 but they were very hard to remove/install so I bought a new one. I did get 10 years out of it so was happy.
 
Last edited:

Homeguy

Rank IV

Pathfinder I

1,212
Calgary, AB
I bought my RV3 back a couple months ago. I was able to use it about 3 night until the fire ban came into effect. I'm leaving for Moab on Monday for 14 days. I'm sure the tent will be fine.


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Obi-Juan

Rank V
Member
Supporter

Pathfinder I

I have had one for 10 years and only just replaced it, I think that was $$$'s well spent and I do not really look after my gear that well.

This is it back in 2008

FB_IMG_1504719342954 by Scott Murray, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1504719128178 by Scott Murray, on Flickr

And then loaning it to a mate who did not know how to set it up breaking a hinge.
I could buy a replacement hinge for around $20 but they were very hard to remove/install so I bought a new one. I did get 10 years out of it so was happy.

What's your sleeping arrangement inside the tent? (example: 2 or 3 cots, side table, or do you just sleep on the ground)

I usually travel with my wife and 6 y/o daughter, so I'm hoping to fit two adult cots and 1 child cot if possible. Do you think this arrangement will work in an RV3 or should I go bigger (RV4 or 5)?

Thanks! :)
 

jtranum

Rank I
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Contributor II

271
Cleveland, MS
Member #

4702

What's your sleeping arrangement inside the tent? (example: 2 or 3 cots, side table, or do you just sleep on the ground)

I usually travel with my wife and 6 y/o daughter, so I'm hoping to fit two adult cots and 1 child cot if possible. Do you think this arrangement will work in an RV3 or should I go bigger (RV4 or 5)?

Thanks! :)
To fit three cots go with the RV5, my Exped double sleeping pad takes up most of the room in my RV-3.
 
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Mogwai

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Enthusiast III

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The Oz tents are popular but that doesn't make them well designed. Huge when bagged, have to get out of bag and go outside to close window flap , what's that about ? They set up fast, ok, what's the hurry? Part of the popularity (IMO) is the price, it screams look at how much I spent. There are threads all over for good ground tents for far less $$.
Most people would prefer to spend more time errr camping and less time setting up and breaking down camp. Especially if you tour and don't stay for more than a night, after a long day on the trail, and potentially in harsh conditions, is fuss with a tent for 20 minutes (which is what I do currently but Oz here we come!).

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Scott Murray

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Australind WA, Australia
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Murray
Member #

3880

What's your sleeping arrangement inside the tent? (example: 2 or 3 cots, side table, or do you just sleep on the ground)

I usually travel with my wife and 6 y/o daughter, so I'm hoping to fit two adult cots and 1 child cot if possible. Do you think this arrangement will work in an RV3 or should I go bigger (RV4 or 5)?

Thanks! :)
Normally I roll out a king self inflating mattress, as others have said go the RV5 if you need more room.
 

buckwilk

Rank III

Enthusiast III

588
yuma, az
Most people would prefer to spend more time errr camping and less time setting up and breaking down camp. Especially if you tour and don't stay for more than a night, after a long day on the trail, and potentially in harsh conditions, is fuss with a tent for 20 minutes (which is what I do currently but Oz here we come!).

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When you include the time staking the Oz doesn't deploy any faster than many other tents out there. For me setting camp is part of the enjoyment of camping.
 

Obi-Juan

Rank V
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Supporter

Pathfinder I

When you include the time staking the Oz doesn't deploy any faster than many other tents out there. For me setting camp is part of the enjoyment of camping.
I think it's all about preference and what benefits each tent style or features work best for you and what your needs are. Here are my requirements for my over-landing tent, which totally differ from my regular camping setup...

1) Easy (not necessarily super quick), setup and break down. And let's face it, most setups require stake and tie down time.

2) Internal space enough to fit up to 3 cots, a side table and 2 dogs

3) Tall enough to stand and move around in comfortably

4) High enough quality to handle high wind, rain, etc.. reasonably well
 

rlhydn

Rank IV

Traveler I

Been using an RV3 for 5 years now. Basecamp and overnight touring. Also have the sidewalks for the awning.

Quick to deploy
Cool in summer
Windows open/close from inside

After 4 years I've replaced the bag with a Aussie made bag that is roomier to include the sidewalls
Have repaired 2 holes from campfire embers.
Used without the optional fly
Used with shadecloth for a ground sheet

No other faults. Survived gale force winds, floods and summer heat.

I don't see any competing alternative. Friend has the competing Black Wolf and spends ages setting up, even longer setting down (complicated folding) and has no awning for crappy weather.

Happily take more time to setup a premium option as long as its ergonomic and worthwhile. Will stick with the RV3 while ours is still alive.

Edited to add - used a southern cross swag on our last big trip for express setups - avoiding waiting on air beds and unwrapping the down sleeping bags although this is no fault of the RV3 itself.
 
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nickburt

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2,871
Wallasey, UK
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We started off with an RV5, with delux side and front panels, together with a tagalong - family of 4, although 2 kids are adult size!! Also fitted a Foxwing, with tapered sides, on the truck so the RV5 and the tagalong can be fitted to the awning. Mixture of sides and tents gives an almost fully enclosed area, with the ability to open up parts of it if needed, or fully enclose to keep the weather out.
Since then, sold the tag along and bought another RV5 - more space, still able to connect to the Foxwing and we get two stand alone tents too. (The tagalong has to be connected to another tent or the Foxwing).

Add them all together and we have some great flexibility.

Awning, connected to both tents, with the extra side and front panels gives a great base camp - loads of space for sitting, cooking etc... etc.... Even moving the truck and leaving the tents in situ is easy - as long as you mark the ground for the truck to go back exactly where it was. But be prepared for the initial set up taking a good bit more than 30 secs per tent!!!

The tent(s) pitched alone and if no extras deployed really are the 30 second tent, unless you want to put all the guy ropes up. If reasonably sheltered, guys aren't needed. Very basic is: tent up, and put 4 pegs in the ground.

The Foxwing is another quick deployment, even with putting guys on the poles - two of us can have it set up in minutes.

As you might guess, I'm sold on them. although expensive, they're well made and have stood up to some really bad weather - wind and rain - never had a leak - even when using the zippered tent connectors. As long as they're pegged down properly (as with any tent), they'll stand up to pretty much anything. Some friends of ours had some damage to their Foxwing in wind, but, if truth be known, it wasn't pegged down properly and had an open side facing the wind.

In all the years we've been camping (40+), the OzTent kit really does beat pretty much anything we've had in the past (with the exception, perhaps, of some ex military kit we have) and some of the small bivvy type survival kit.

Spares are readily available, and canvas repairs can also be easily carried out, even in the field - but that's the same for any tent if you carry the right kit.
 

Silverback_WK2

Rank V
Member

Traveler I

1,836
Tontitown, AR
Member #

5952

I've been using an Oz-tent RV3 for about a year now on a regular basis, about 1-2 weekends a month. Some people get confused about tents categories when talking about tents, they compare the oz-tent to backpacking tents and say look how big and heavy it is. The Oz tent is a base camp expedition tent, designed to handle extreme elements for extended periods of time. When packed my Rv-3 is about 6.5 feet long and weighs about 50 pounds, not a big deal when it's going on a roof rack.

Why did I go with an RV-3 when there are smaller options? I have several top of the line backpacking tents like the MSR carbon reflex but when you are traveling by vehicle you have the option to carry larger shelters like an Oz tent. If you go with a canvas RTT like CVT or Tepui you are added over 150lbs minimum to the highest point of your vehicle and a canvas RTT does not pack down slim line for aerodynamics, it's just a big square on your roof. The Oz-tent packs down long and skinny on your roof rack to where you hardly feel any drag or mpg loss from it. Secondly is cost; Oz-tent $1000, canvas RTT $2,000+. The third factor in my buying decision was ability to move vehicle to vehicle. I have 4 different vehicles I camp out of, the Oz-tent isn't married to one vehicle, it's just strapped to the roof rack of whatever vehicle I'm taking that weekend. The final factor was ease of setup. The 30 second setup claim is true, except they don't factor in anchor time in the time claim. I can have my RV-3 off the roof rack and completely setup in 5 minutes or less.

So far I have about 50 nights in it and I don't have a single complaint.


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This post may have been my decision maker.
Makes sense.
Thanks for the input!