What means of communication do you have available?

  • Hi Guest, you may choose a LIGHT or DARK theme that works best for you with the "Style Chooser" button at the bottom left on this page!
  • HTML tutorial

What means of communication do you have for the trail?


  • Total voters
    121

TerryD

Rank VI
Member

Member III

3,402
Covington, Virginia, USA
First Name
Terry
Last Name
R
Member #

3710

Ham Callsign
KT4OZ
This kind of stems from a discussion @yabbaz and I were having this morning and it got me thinking. So this thread isn't to discuss the merits of any one means of communication, rather to just gauge what the community has available as a whole. I figured a poll would be easiest. If I missed any options let me know. Hopefully I can edit the poll?
 

Steve

lost again...
Founder 500
Member

Traveler III

4,312
Lorain County, OH, USA
First Name
Steve
Last Name
.
Member #

202

Cell phone, cellular tablet, CB, and GMRS with lower FRS channels.

The poll may be skewed, as multiple options are available. So cell phone will be tops, even though those people may use their HAM more on the trail. But it will be a good indicator as to what folks have.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TerryD

Sean S

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,268
California, USA
First Name
Sean
Last Name
S
Cell phone, CB mobile and handheld, 2M/70cm mobile and handheld Ham Radio, Handheld radios configured for GMRS, FRS, and MURS channels. I always like to have options, especially if I am off geocaching/overlanding on my own. I also carry an ARRL Repeater Directory in case I end up going somewhere and have not programmed my Ham Radios for the area.
 

TerryD

Rank VI
Member

Member III

3,402
Covington, Virginia, USA
First Name
Terry
Last Name
R
Member #

3710

Ham Callsign
KT4OZ
I also carry an ARRL Repeater Directory in case I end up going somewhere and have not programmed my Ham Radios for the area.
I've been meaning to order the new one but generally carry my old copy of the Repeater Book one as well. I guess I'll put that on my to do list for the weekend.
 
  • Like
Reactions: britz

Neb_Sojourner

Rank I
Member

Traveler I

271
York Nebraska, USA
Member #

4588

I've been meaning to order the new one but generally carry my old copy of the Repeater Book one as well. I guess I'll put that on my to do list for the weekend.
I finally broke down and ordered one a month or so ago, didn't realize my last copy was from 2011...lol. Went with the spiral bound desk top version, it is a little bigger but I'm old and it makes it easier to see the little print...lol
 
  • Like
Reactions: TerryD

toxicity_27

US MidWest Region Member Rep
Member

Member II

3,278
Minnesota
Member #

0656

Cell phone, had a CB in the old Jeep, but won't be putting it in this one. And a UV5-R. Looking into mobile options as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TerryD

TerryD

Rank VI
Member

Member III

3,402
Covington, Virginia, USA
First Name
Terry
Last Name
R
Member #

3710

Ham Callsign
KT4OZ
Very good fellas! It seems like it's a pretty good bet to have Ham, FRS/GMRS or CB. I guess I've got to work out a CB antenna for the Xterra and get the Cobra 75 I've been eyeballing. I have my 2m/44o setup and I'm getting ready to pick up a 857d from a friend for HF ability. I also need to nab some FRS/GMRS HTs. I loaned mine to a friend and he knocked the antennas off both of them!
 

1Louder

Rank VI
Member

Member II

4,187
AZ
First Name
Chris
Last Name
K
Member #

1437

Ham Callsign
K1LDR
Mobile phone, 2 Ham radios, 1 handheld Ham radio, 1 CB, Delorme InReach, 2 FRS Radios, APRS via Ham.

Someone needs to buy me a Sat phone!

All have their time and place.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TerryD

dstock

Rank V
Member

Member III

2,354
Lake Arrowhead, CA, USA
First Name
Dave
Last Name
Stockslager
Member #

2951

Ham Callsign
KM6ZGS
Cell Phone, GMRS/FRS (too many), CB, Inreach SE, ham handheld - monitor/Emergency (not licensed yet)
 

Sean S

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,268
California, USA
First Name
Sean
Last Name
S
Cell phone, CB mobile and handheld, 2M/70cm mobile and handheld Ham Radio, Handheld radios configured for GMRS, FRS, and MURS channels. I always like to have options, especially if I am off geocaching/overlanding on my own. I also carry an ARRL Repeater Directory in case I end up going somewhere and have not programmed my Ham Radios for the area.
Time to update my list of communication types that I have access to in the rig. The forums have been invaluable as a treasure throve of useful information based on the many years of combined experience of my fellow overlanders. When I first participated in this poll, I felt that I was pretty much covered in terms of the various types of communciations but after reading some of the other responses, I quickly realized that I was a bit behind the times. I saw multiples mentions of something called Delorme InReach and I had read many mixed reviews of the spotty and unreliable coverage offered by the subscription-based SPOT tracking system over the years. My knowledge on the whole subject was a bit primitive and definitely out-of-date. Time to learn more!

I was fortunate to also attend my first OB rally last Wednesday night and saw how the various rigs were outfitted with communication equipment. This was a great learning experience and @hallry spoke to me about all the positive sides of the well developed and reliable Delorme InReach that he had installed in his rig. It was an eye-opener and I appreciated his recommendations. I also noticed that it was a common device in most of the rigs I looked at or more accurately drooled over! I knew that I had to learn more about it.

A few months ago, I was overlanding in the desert east of Yuma Arizona when my wife fell ill and had to be rushed to emergency. While I had a fully functioning Ham Radio, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and a CB, I had no cell service, which was the only means that she had from over 600 miles away to reach me. I emerged from the desert, drove to Yuma for provisions and only then learned of her illness and hospitalization.

After many hours of research and the OB rally, I knew that the Delorme InReach satellite-based 2-way messaging system could have been used to reach me.
My research also revealed that the much-admired Delorme InReach SE and Explorer models had just been discontinued by Garmin who had acquired Delorme last year and had now merged this trusted technology into the newer, unproven and more expensive Garmin InReach+ and Explorer+ models. Online inventories of these older models are quickly drying up as folks rush to buy the last remaining ones. Last night, I was fortunate and managed to buy one of the last available Delorme InReach SE models from the REI online store.
3.jpg
I had checked a few days ago with no luck. This morning, they are all sold out again. Good timing! I just hope that I was not the victim of an online inventory glitch and that it actually ships.
I plan to initially combine this device with the flexible recreational freedom plan, which as the name suggests allows me the freedom to suspend service during those months when I am not overlanding. I might adjust the plan as I begin to use this new messaging system.
Plans.jpg
My research also came across an excellent thread regarding Personal Locator Beacons and how they differ greatly from the "SPOT", "InReach" Personal Messenger-based communication systems. This is another area where I am a complete novice. Special thanks to @AKBushDag for sharing his knowledge on the topic.
PLBs (Personal Locator Beacons) should only be used in situations of grave and imminent danger, and only as a last resort when all means of self-rescue have been exhausted.
No subscriptions, no two-way communication, just a simple registration is required. The device does not need charging and is ready-to-go out of the box. The battery has a five year shelf-life. The 5 watt transmitter is many times more powerful than the "SPOT" and "InReach" Personal Messenger-based communication systems and can be reliably used in heavy tree cover and steep valley areas. It will transmit your GPS location and identification at 406 MHz and simultaneously act as a homing beacon for Search and Rescue at 121.5MHz for about 1.5 days. It has even been designed to be operated with just one hand. Two simple steps are all that's needed to activate the beacon.
ACR Steps.jpg
After some research, I visited my local REI today and bought the ACR Electronics ResQLink+ GPS Personal Locator Beacon. Online registration only took a few minutes and now I am good to go. I just have to get into the habit of having the PLB with me. This is priceless insurance for the unexpected, worst case scenario. Whilst extremely rare, tragedies do happen and I want to stay as safe as possible while overlanding, offroading and hiking as I am sometimes alone and accidents can happen to even the most prepared.
 

Flipper

Rank V
Member

Member III

2,865
Florida
First Name
John
Last Name
F
Member #

5021

2M, two 2M handhelds, CB, marine VHF and handheld, Iphone


Sent from my iPad using OB Talk
 
Last edited:

Flipper

Rank V
Member

Member III

2,865
Florida
First Name
John
Last Name
F
Member #

5021

Cell phone, CB mobile and handheld, 2M/70cm mobile and handheld Ham Radio, Handheld radios configured for GMRS, FRS, and MURS channels. I always like to have options, especially if I am off geocaching/overlanding on my own. I also carry an ARRL Repeater Directory in case I end up going somewhere and have not programmed my Ham Radios for the area.
Repeater handbook just got an app, load your location in ,lists all repeaters from 0-500 miles



Sent from my iPad using OB Talk
 

Flipper

Rank V
Member

Member III

2,865
Florida
First Name
John
Last Name
F
Member #

5021

Time to update my list of communication types that I have access to in the rig. The forums have been invaluable as a treasure throve of useful information based on the many years of combined experience of my fellow overlanders. When I first participated in this poll, I felt that I was pretty much covered in terms of the various types of communciations but after reading some of the other responses, I quickly realized that I was a bit behind the times. I saw multiples mentions of something called Delorme InReach and I had read many mixed reviews of the spotty and unreliable coverage offered by the subscription-based SPOT tracking system over the years. My knowledge on the whole subject was a bit primitive and definitely out-of-date. Time to learn more!

I was fortunate to also attend my first OB rally last Wednesday night and saw how the various rigs were outfitted with communication equipment. This was a great learning experience and @hallry spoke to me about all the positive sides of the well developed and reliable Delorme InReach that he had installed in his rig. It was an eye-opener and I appreciated his recommendations. I also noticed that it was a common device in most of the rigs I looked at or more accurately drooled over! I knew that I had to learn more about it.

A few months ago, I was overlanding in the desert east of Yuma Arizona when my wife fell ill and had to be rushed to emergency. While I had a fully functioning Ham Radio, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and a CB, I had no cell service, which was the only means that she had from over 600 miles away to reach me. I emerged from the desert, drove to Yuma for provisions and only then learned of her illness and hospitalization.

After many hours of research and the OB rally, I knew that the Delorme InReach satellite-based 2-way messaging system could have been used to reach me.
My research also revealed that the much-admired Delorme InReach SE and Explorer models had just been discontinued by Garmin who had acquired Delorme last year and had now merged this trusted technology into the newer, unproven and more expensive Garmin InReach+ and Explorer+ models. Online inventories of these older models are quickly drying up as folks rush to buy the last remaining ones. Last night, I was fortunate and managed to buy one of the last available Delorme InReach SE models from the REI online store.
View attachment 22648
I had checked a few days ago with no luck. This morning, they are all sold out again. Good timing! I just hope that I was not the victim of an online inventory glitch and that it actually ships.
I plan to initially combine this device with the flexible recreational freedom plan, which as the name suggests allows me the freedom to suspend service during those months when I am not overlanding. I might adjust the plan as I begin to use this new messaging system.
View attachment 22647
My research also came across an excellent thread regarding Personal Locator Beacons and how they differ greatly from the "SPOT", "InReach" Personal Messenger-based communication systems. This is another area where I am a complete novice. Special thanks to @AKBushDag for sharing his knowledge on the topic.
PLBs (Personal Locator Beacons) should only be used in situations of grave and imminent danger, and only as a last resort when all means of self-rescue have been exhausted.
No subscriptions, no two-way communication, just a simple registration is required. The device does not need charging and is ready-to-go out of the box. The battery has a five year shelf-life. The 5 watt transmitter is many times more powerful than the "SPOT" and "InReach" Personal Messenger-based communication systems and can be reliably used in heavy tree cover and steep valley areas. It will transmit your GPS location and identification at 406 MHz and simultaneously act as a homing beacon for Search and Rescue at 121.5MHz for about 1.5 days. It has even been designed to be operated with just one hand. Two simple steps are all that's needed to activate the beacon.
View attachment 22650
After some research, I visited my local REI today and bought the ACR Electronics ResQLink+ GPS Personal Locator Beacon. Online registration only took a few minutes and now I am good to go. I just have to get into the habit of having the PLB with me. This is priceless insurance for the unexpected, worst case scenario. Whilst extremely rare, tragedies do happen and I want to stay as safe as possible while overlanding, offroading and hiking as I am sometimes alone and accidents can happen to even the most prepared.
I used to work at a West Marine, sold a ton of these, great product


Sent from my iPad using OB Talk
 
  • Like
Reactions: TerryD and Sean S

TerryD

Rank VI
Member

Member III

3,402
Covington, Virginia, USA
First Name
Terry
Last Name
R
Member #

3710

Ham Callsign
KT4OZ
Repeater handbook just got an app, load your location in ,lists all repeaters from 0-500 miles



Sent from my iPad using OB Talk
I use repeater book's app, but a hardcopy for those times you have no service is a good idea and for $10-15 from ARRL (also supports our continued access to the frequencies) is a good one to have. I have the ArtSci one as well.
 

Flipper

Rank V
Member

Member III

2,865
Florida
First Name
John
Last Name
F
Member #

5021

I use repeater book's app, but a hardcopy for those times you have no service is a good idea and for $10-15 from ARRL (also supports our continued access to the frequencies) is a good one to have. I have the ArtSci one as well.
I have a hard copy also, what I like about the app is when we are 4 wheeling it shows my location and the list of repeaters in distance from my location,I usually set the range at 20 or 50 miles


Sent from my iPad using OB Talk