What is the last thing you bought and plan to buy?

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Joey83

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The last thing I bought was 4 new tires for my hatchback that I bought today, got Falken Ziex ZE310 in a 205/50-15 size
 
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Billiebob

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anything I buy I like to eliminate technology, buy simple, spend less
overlanding I keep as simple as possible

Next big buy will be power for a fridge.... plus a bit of expandability for cell, tablet charging, but I can do that daily driving the Jeep.
For now fridge power plus a bit

With a trailer I'm leaning to pure solar, if a charging curcuit is required off the Jeep, I'll add it later but I'm hoping for pure solar on the trailer to do it all.
Most fridges draw 5 to 6 amps. The best buys for permanent roof top solar seem to be in the 200-240 watt range which I think will charge a battery in ideal conditions in about 8 to 10 hours maybe less under clear skies if the fridge is the only draw.

Any advice on how niave I am will be appreciated.

Thinking something like this.

less the inverter

51O6gR8Y4cL._AC_SL1000_.jpg

plus the 12V outlet, 2 USB Port thingee.... if it will connect direct to the battery ? or will it require fuses too

71CrekE74zL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

VS.....

which adds the 12V out to the fridge plus 2 USB ports...... but does this include curcuit bearkers for the 12V output ?

61xTdUgT48L._AC_SL1000_.jpg
 
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Road

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anything I buy I like to eliminate technology, buy simple, spend less
overlanding I keep as simple as possible

Next big buy will be power for a fridge.... plus a bit of expandability for cell, tablet charging, but I can do that daily driving the Jeep.
For now fridge power plus a bit

With a trailer I'm leaning to pure solar, if a charging curcuit is required off the Jeep, I'll add it later but I'm hoping for pure solar on the trailer to do it all.
Most fridges draw 5 to 6 amps. The best buys for permanent roof top solar seem to be in the 200-240 watt range which I think will charge a battery in ideal conditions in about 8 to 10 hours maybe less under clear skies if the fridge is the only draw.

Any advice on how niave I am will be appreciated.

Thinking something like this.

less the inverter

View attachment 197126

plus the 12V outlet, 2 USB Port thingee.... if it will connect direct to the battery ? or will it require fuses too

View attachment 197128

VS.....

which adds the 12V out to the fridge plus 2 USB ports...... but does this include curcuit bearkers for the 12V output ?

View attachment 197127
.

With as used to camping without solar as you are already, @Billiebob, you might find you don't need as much as 200w of panel.

I've used a 120w folding panel for years on my trailer, feeding 100ah of deep cycle (two 50ah batteries) through a simple Zamp Charge Controller. It's been plenty for what I need: a low draw 12v ARB fridge, 12v water pump, air compressor, trailer lights, 2x 12v outlet which I use for charging mobile devices, camera batteries, etc.

The system is independent of the starting system. I've found that strapping my folding panel to the roof of the RTT when parked or underway, it does a great job keeping the deep cycles topped off all year long.

I have a 1000w inverter hooked up to the deep cycle, too, that I use occasionally to charge my bike battery or run an electric hair clipper, etc.

The charge controller shows me how much the panel is putting in, charging status, battery condition, etc. and can be easily set for different types of batteries; AGM, etc, though the one I have does not do lithium batteries, I don't think.

PowerCtr_9429.JPG
.
It's worked so well for me that I'm duplicatingthe same exact set up on my van so I have redundant systems that can run independently if away from basecamp or if I just take the van for a photography outing. Then whoever is back at camp still has power, too.

Yes, anything you connect to the deep cycle should be fused. Easiest is to connect a Blue Sea Fuse Block to your battery, then run your wiring from that to whatever outlets, lights, air compressor, etc. I have a 12 circuit Blue Sea at right in the image above, though the link I provided goes to a 6 circuit. Most people find that once they have a solar set up and power stored in a deep cycle, they find other 12v things they'd like to power, too. Like a fan, another outlet with USB like you show, etc. So, sometimes it's easier to go ahead and install a fuse block with more circuits from the start.

I do have an inline battery charger/maintainer, too (a NOCO Genius Mini 2), that takes shore power and keeps your batteries in shape when parked. Though with my panel on the roof full time through the winter, or moved around camp when camping, I haven't had to use it to charge/maintain my batteries in a over a year and half.

Here's my current power center setup, though it certainly does not need all this to be effective for what you want to do:

power-center_5863-900.jpeg
Clockwise from top left:
- 110 outlet box (in from shore power, out from inverter),
- 2x 50ah deep cycles (stacked)
- toggle switches above the batteries for the rock lights, trailer lights, air compressor, water pump, etc
- 12 circuit Blue Sea Fuse Block (right wall)
- ARB air compressor relay
- ARB air compressor beneath that
- Genius Mini2 battery charger/maintainer
- 1000w pure sine inverter
- port for passing through air hose, extension cords, etc

Looks more complicated than it is.

Hope that helps. If there's any other info I can help with, let me know.
.
 
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Tommy9610

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Last thing I bought was a drone, now if I can only figure out how to take video with it, figuring out how to fly it wasn't that hard, but I am struggling to make it connect to a phone and take video.
 
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Billiebob

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With as used to camping without solar as you are already, @Billiebob, you might find you don't need as much as 200w of panel.

I've used a 120w folding panel for years on my trailer, feeding 100ah of deep cycle (two 50ah batteries) through a simple Zamp Charge Controller. It's been plenty for what I need: a low draw 12v ARB fridge, air compressor, trailer lights, 2x 12v outlet which I use for charging mobile devices, camera batteries, etc.

The system is independent of the starting system. I've found that strapping my folding panel to the roof of the RTT when parked or underway, it does a great job keeping the deep cycles topped off all year long.

I have a 1000w inverter hooked up to the deep cycle, too, that I use occasionally to charge my bike battery or run an electric hair clipper, etc.

The charge controller shows me how much the panel is putting in, charging status, battery condition, etc. and can be easily set for different types of batteries; AGM, etc, though the one I have does not do lithium batteries, I don't think.

View attachment 197132
.
It's worked so well for me that I'm duplicatingthe same exact set up on my van so I have redundant systems that can run independently if away from basecamp or if I just take the van for a photography outing. Then whoever is back at camp still has power, too.

Yes, anything you connect to the deep cycle should be fused. Easiest is to connect a Blue Sea Fuse Block to your battery, then run your wiring from that to whatever outlets, lights, air compressor, etc. I have a 12 circuit Blue Sea at right in the image above, though the link I provided goes to a 6 circuit. Most people find that once they have a solar set up and power stored in a deep cycle, they find other 12v things they'd like to power, too. Like a fan, another outlet with USB like you show, etc. So, sometimes it's easier to go ahead and install a fuse block with more circuits from the start.

I do have an inline battery charger/maintainer, too (a NOCO Genius Mini 2), that takes shore power and keeps your batteries in shape when parked. Though with my panel on the roof full time through the winter, or moved around camp when camping, I haven't had to use it to charge my batteries in a over a year and half.

Here's my current power center setup, though it certainly does not need all this to be effective for what you want to do:

View attachment 197136


Hope that helps. If there's any other info I can help with, let me know.
.
many thx, this is exactly what I need to know
A box of beer on me should we ever meet

I have been leaning to the first solar choice of just power in from the solar, power out to the battery......
then adding a fuse distribution system, never a fan of the all inclusive like the second choice showm.

again, many thanks for you input,
corona-on-d-beach.jpg
 
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Apoclapedia

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The 94 F350 can hide a 15,000 pound behind the stock bumper very well.
View attachment 197141View attachment 197142View attachment 197143
It can, youre right. It will fit. I just have a style of bumper i like to build for my rigs. It allows me to mount the winch in to a receiver hitch i fab in to my front and back bumpers. That way i can store my winch in the tool box and then choose weather i think i should pull myself through something or pull myself back out of something. I throw it on the back for things like water crossings or steep decents. And on the front to get up and over stuff or out of holes. Adds versatility. Pulling off the front isn’t always the best option. Sometimes its just easier to go back and pick another line.
 
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Road

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many thx, this is exactly what I need to know
A box of beer on me should we ever meet

I have been leaning to the first solar choice of just power in from the solar, power ot to the battery......
then adding a fuse distribution system, never a fan of the all inclusive like the second choice showm.

again, many thanks for you input,
View attachment 197144
.
Thanks!

Simple is better, I agree. The system on my van will be capable of being expanded, but will start simply with a 120w folding solar panel mounted to the roof in a quick mount setup (so I can easily take it down to move around camp with the long extension cables I've made) going through a charge controller to a single 100ah deep cycle. From that will be a 100 amp fuse between it and the Blue Sea 12 circuit fuse block. From there, it's just running wiring to the various items/outlets.

No battery isolator, no solenoid switches, not even hooked to the starting batt or alternator. With the panels working full time, even in Maine with short winter days, I haven't felt the need to combine it yet. I used to pack my folding panels away when underway or parked in a driveway, and would run an extension cord and let the NOCO handle the charging. Then I thought shit, I have a great power source in my panels, and plugged them in full time.
.
 
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Billiebob

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Thanks!

Simple is better, I agree. The system on my van will be capable of being expanded, but will start simply with a 120w folding solar panel mounted to the roof in a quick mount setup (so I can easily take it down to move around camp with the long extension cables I've made) going through a charge controller to a single 100ah deep cycle. From that will be a 100 amp fuse between it and the Blue Sea 12 circuit fuse block. From there, it's just running wiring to the various items/outlets.

No battery isolator, no solenoid switches, not even hooked to the starting batt or alternator. With the panels working full time, even in Maine with short winter days, I haven't felt the need to combine it yet. I used to pack my folding panels away when underway or parked in a driveway, and would run an extension cord and let the NOCO handle the charging. Then I thought shit, I have a great power source in my panels, and plugged them in full time.
.
yep.I'm only leaning to 200W because it looks like the gest buy, 100W is not half price and 400W is way beyond double the price. So 200W will charge the battery faster than 100W on an overcast day..... plus who knows maybe I'll add an inverter an Expresso Maker.... and open the first overland Second Cup.

But i'm lovin' the isolated systems. The option of changing tow vehicles without any need to reintegrate systems. Or park the trailer and be truly off grid if the tow vehicle needs service..... etc.
 
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Road

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yep.I'm only leaning to 200W because it looks like the gest buy, 100W is not half price and 400W is way beyond double the price. So 200W will charge the battery faster than 100W on an overcast day..... plus who knows maybe I'll add an inverter an Expresso Maker.... and open the first overland Second Cup.

But i'm lovin' the isolated systems. The option of changing tow vehicles without any need to reintegrate systems. Or park the trailer and be truly off grid if the tow vehicle needs service..... etc.
.
Not all solar panels are built equally as far as light gathering capabilities. Some vendors outsource their needs to various places depending on cost, so the cells they use in their panels this year may not be as efficient as those they had last year. This is a good article on which solar cells are used by panel mfgs, and which are most efficient: Most Efficient Solar Panels On the Market. You can get a cheaper higher watt panel that actually does not produce as much power as a better lower watt panel.

You'll want to do some reading on which battery ah will suit your purposes best with a 200w panel, too. With not much draw, a 100ah of deep cycle should do you just fine with 200w of panel. Here's just one convo on that sort of thing: Battery Choices for a 200w 12v system in winter.

I don't want to bogart this thread with just solar talk, though...
.
 
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TahoePPV

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Not all solar panels are built equally as far as light gathering capabilities. Some vendors outsource their needs to various places depending on cost, so the cells they use in their panels this year may not be as efficient as those they had last year. This is a good article on which solar cells are used by panel mfgs, and which are most efficient: Most Efficient Solar Panels On the Market. You can get a cheaper higher watt panel that actually does not produce as much power as a better lower watt panel.

You'll want to do some reading on which battery ah will suit your purposes best with a 200w panel, too. With not much draw, a 100ah of deep cycle should do you just fine with 200w of panel. Here's just one convo on that sort of thing: Battery Choices for a 200w 12v system in winter.

I don't want to bogart this thread with just solar talk, though...
.
I enjoy when a tangential idea pops up, with enough info to take me off on further searches.
 
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RoarinRow

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Last thing I bought was a drone, now if I can only figure out how to take video with it, figuring out how to fly it wasn't that hard, but I am struggling to make it connect to a phone and take video.
Lots of YouTube video on getting started with a drone.
 

M Rose

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I’ve seen hidden front receiver mounts on the front of the Areos as well. As for pulling the whole front end off... I’m more concerned with ripping the frame out from under the truck... besides... if I tweek the bumper I can get a new one for $50.00 at the wrecking yard.