Vintage Overlanding

  • Hi Guest, you may choose a LIGHT or DARK theme that works best for you with the "Style Chooser" button at the bottom left on this page!
  • HTML tutorial

Iubootgater

Rank III
Founder 500
Member

Advocate II

761
Greenwood IN
Member #

062

I find myself thinking more and more about a vintage LC/LR . I start out a ebay search with intentions of finding a 100 series LC or something similar and always end up looking a 60 series and troopies. Living in the Midwest does not require allot of rock crawling or extended desert crossings. I used to be a mechanic so working on a old truck does not bother me. Anyone else had similar thoughts? If muddy two tracks and back country roads are the bulk of your overland travel do you need all the latest tech and reliability of new Toyota?

A quick search does not provide allot in the way of "Vintage Overlanding" topics. I love all the new tech like gps and refrigerators but I just don't know if I really need all that besides my iphone and a cooler. Maybe map/compass and a tent can bring me just as much satisfaction? Just maybe doing all this in a 30 plus year old rig will bring a different kind of satisfaction...Just wondering out loud.

Wilson
 

Robert OB 33/48

Mid Europe Region Director
Founder 500
Member
Supporter

Pathfinder II

4,387
Gaanderen
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Keim
Member #

0033

Hello Wilson,

It will. It will be fun, and I guess, if you do high tech or just plain overlanding. It will still be fun.
Go for it.

Greetings from Robert
 

Lifestyle Overland

Rank VI
Founder 500
Member
Supporter

Navigator I

4,226
On the Road
Member #

0102

I think a lot of your decision hinges on your current circumstances. For example; a "vintage" rig is great if you have the abilities and tools to maintain it properly and you're not afraid of getting stranded when the worst happens. But if you have a couple of kids screaming in the back and a wife who is giving you "the look" while you're troubleshooting your rig that won't start... then maybe something a bit more modern is your best bet.
Now that being said; if you had a good support group of other overlanders to back you up and get you out of a tight spot then the risk is reduced a bit. Living in the southwest I've found that getting stranded alone can be dangerous, (and/or deadly) and having dependents under your care can further increase the risk. I generally do my more remote expeditions with our off-road club for the support, regardless of which rig I take. This doesn't mean it can't be done in an older rig, just that you need to be mindful of the risk and put some safeguards in place to help mitigate the risk. A good rule of thumb is to travel with two days supply of food and water, even if it's just a day trip.

Another advantage of a vintage rig is the startup cost. You can buy a solid running older vehicle and develop it as you have time and funds, whereas a newer rig will suck your cash up quick and not leave as much left over for accessories and mods. The trade off is the reliability and modern conviences like, power windows, air-conditioning, etc. The greatest advantage I have when I take the 4Runner out is the peace of mind that there aren't any gremlins waiting to cause trouble when I'm 100 miles past B.F.E. But I will admit, it doesn't give you the same feeling as firing up a 35 year old Australian HJ45 and heading off into the unknown with a plethora of tools, spare parts, extra food and water. Sometimes the most memorable trips are the ones where you had to overcome a mechanical challenge... but those are best enjoyed without the screaming. :wink:

The bottom line is your own preference. Either route is completely attainable, you just need to enter into a build with your priorities and goals in line. I prefer my 1980 Troopy, but my primary ride is the 2014 4Runner because of the convenience and peace of mind it gives. That's just where I am at this point of my life. Some day the kids will be older and traveling will be easier, by then the Beast will be ready to haul us around in style.

That's my two cents worth on the subject. Good luck with your decision!
 

Iubootgater

Rank III
Founder 500
Member

Advocate II

761
Greenwood IN
Member #

062

@Stringtwelve-

Ya, I know what I should do but my love of old cars keeps getting in way. I got a two year plan to find next rig, that sounds like allot of time till you try to find a good Toyota east of the Mississippi. Selling a house and moving this year so circumstances are likely to change several times before I pull the trigger. I will say it again sir I think you have found the best of both.

thanks for the input

Wilson
 

SLO Rob

Rank VI
Staff member
Founder 500
Member

Influencer II

3,316
San Luis Obispo, CA
First Name
Rob
Last Name
Petterson
Member #

0012

I love the idea of this. I stalk this site often www.jdmlandcruisers.com  I have no idea who they are and they are on the other coast to me, but man o man, but they have such cool stuff! My truck is a 2000 and compared to some new ones, I feel pretty dang vintage already!
 

kiddirt40

Rank I
Founder 500
Member

Contributor I

233
Wilson,

Also being in the mid-west having a rock crawler or a desert rig is not needed. A solid well built rig is always a good foundation. Just make sure that you have room for the gear you want to carry. I travel many two rut roads and less than quality dirt roads. The high tech add-on's are nice, but not always needed. Stay with what you are happy with. Crank windows still work without the key on.
 

Michael

Rank VII
Staff member
Founder 500
Member

Pioneer II

8,507
Dublin, CA
First Name
Michael
Last Name
Murguia
Member #

0000

Ham Callsign
KM6YSL
I Really think @msoverlandbound would have an opinion here.  She has a crush on the Sackwear cruiser!

Sackwear

M
 

pl626

Rank V
Founder 500
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
McLean, VA
Member #

0211

I may be biased, but I like the idea of giving an old rig a new life.  Though it may appear cheaper at first blush, some older rigs can be money-pits in disguise.  If you are particular to a certain make, that may not matter.

An older rig may be cheaper to acquire, but if it turns out to be incompatible with what you want to do, it may be harder to sell and recover your costs.  On the other hand, you may be able to find a nice overlander that already has the upgrades you want, without the new add-on prices.
 

Robert OB 33/48

Mid Europe Region Director
Founder 500
Member
Supporter

Pathfinder II

4,387
Gaanderen
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Keim
Member #

0033

I love old Rigs, actually all of them. But I have that old 1987 VW T3 (vanagon) which is now a bit very old. But still rocking. 28 years of age.

My Frontera is younger, just a 1995 car. Still its now 20 years old. And both are really rocking.

Yes I would love to have a brand new Ford Raptor or such. But hey, these two cars have soo much blood, sweat, tears and most of laughter in them it is hard to let them go.




These are my babies.

Greetings from Robert
 

UKCRD

Rank II
Founder 500
Member

Contributor III

327
10153 said:
I think a restoring an FJ40 is the perfect way for couples to bond. Just sayin, @overlandbound.
Corrie, I've yearned for an FJ40 for years now.  Not sure it'll happen but I haven't given up hope yet!

@OP I've done a fair bit of overloading in a 70s CJ5. I didn't get many probs at all but I pedantic at maintaining it and keeping it very ship-shape. You might also want to think about where you're going to be overloading predominantly when choosing a vintage rig. If you're heading into Africa a lot an old Land Rover makes sense as it'll be easy to find parts and capable mechanics if needed. Certain 4wd makes and models were popular in different parts of the world so this can be a factor when choosing a rig.