Tundra Build

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knkunz

Rank IV
Benefactor
Member

Contributor III

1,222
Minot ND
Member #

13843

In my experience building my tundra, research!! Take your time and make sure it’s the right product for you and the application you are going for. It will save you a lot of money and headaches. If I had it to do over I would have worked out the bed rack or GFC as well as bed storage and bumpers before tackling the suspension upgrades. The weight you add will help you in determining your suspension upgrades. Like deaver springs and so on. Also, go light weight and minimalist style if your concerned about fuel mileage. And regear if you you go with anything over a 35” tire. I went 4:88, But now I wish I would have gone to 5:29. Good luck. I look forward to seeing what you do.
 

Inkedshooter

Rank I
Member

Contributor I

233
Brentwood, CA, USA
Member #

16227

+1 to research! It took me a year before figuring out the mods and add-ons I wanted to do to my 2017 SR5. I drove the truck stock through any type of terrain and weather condition and made notes where I wanted to make improvements. For me personally I decided to go the route of an improved trail rig as my Tundra is also my daily driver. The first two upgrades I did were suspension and wheels/tires. I went with an Icon Stage 1 (front coil overs and rear shocks) then added a 1” block in the rear (this will be swapped out with a better leaf spring) and set the front coil overs to 2.5”. Wheels and tires I decided on a set of Fuel Zephyr, 33” tires Nitto Terra Graplers. Because our family, and a few friends of ours owns cabins and property, I know I wanted to add a winch but keeping in mind I’ll use it a couple times a month I picked up a Smittybilt X20 with synthetic rope. Bumper upgrades I picked up a set of DV8 Offroad bumpers from eBay for less than $1000 for the pair. Then I added a set of Smittybilt fender flares, an AllPro Offroad bed rack, Smittybilt awning and Overlander XL rooftop tent when our family goes camping. All of this stuff was all planned out, researched, and researched some more before purchasing as I was also trying to stay within a budget.

For your Tundra maybe start with a suspension upgrade and go from there
 

Bilbo

Rank I
Member

Member I

233
Vancouver, WA, USA
First Name
Jeremy
Last Name
Brumbaugh
Member #

17002

I just got a 2016 Tundra. Started with new tires and wheels. I wanted something that didn't require any significant modifications. Then came the Bilsteins, which are relatively inexpensive but a lot better than stock and give you some minimal lift up to 2 inches or so. Bilsteins are 6112 up front and 5160 in the rear. I am debating whether or not to get the Toytec 1-inch shackles to lift the rear. Will wait until I add the canopy and second battery to see how it sits.
 

RoarinRow

Rank V
Member

Enthusiast III

1,721
Elk Grove, CA, USA
First Name
Rolando
Last Name
Nispiros
Member #

17011

I’d say it depends on what kind of overlanding you’re expecting to do and how many in your family. For a daily driver you might not want anything permanently installed. When you’re back from overlanding you might want to empty your truck like it for better fuel economy etc.
 
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