To Chainsaw or not to Chainsaw, that is the question

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TerraCrawler

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I have been DEEP into National Forest, along narrow ridge lines, and come across many situations like this:

94991

So, I wonder what I would have done if that tree was not already handled by someone. In fact, there have been situations where I have had to turn around, but it hasn't been on a very narrow section so I was ok. I am often pulling my XVenture XV-3 trailer, so if I come up on a down tree, on a narrow pass, that is not going to be a pleasant situation.

What do you all do to combat the situation of fallen trees? Silky Saw? Chainsaw? Turn Around?
 

grubworm

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I have been DEEP into National Forest, along narrow ridge lines, and come across many situations like this:

View attachment 94991

So, I wonder what I would have done if that tree was not already handled by someone. In fact, there have been situations where I have had to turn around, but it hasn't been on a very narrow section so I was ok. I am often pulling my XVenture XV-3 trailer, so if I come up on a down tree, on a narrow pass, that is not going to be a pleasant situation.

What do you all do to combat the situation of fallen trees? Silky Saw? Chainsaw? Turn Around?
Good question. I dont carry a chainsaw because they always leak bar lube all over and take up a good bit of space. I'd just turn around. Besides, if I did have a saw, I'd be worried that I shouldn't be taking it upon myself to clear it. I figure if its land I don't own, I probably should leave stuff like that alone...a Ranger would probably bitch at me rather than thank me because I'm sure they are worried about liability, etc
 

old_man

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four options
1) turn around
2) use an axe or hatchet
3) use a bow saw (easy to pack and relatively cheap)
4) small chain saw.

With all the beetle kill pine and high winds these days around Colorado, I carry a small 18" chain saw and a bow saw. I went down a trail not too long ago and went back the same way a couple of hours later and it had three fallen trees.
A bow saw will work for smaller trees, but be prepared to work up a sweat. Also in order to move the trees, I ended up cutting them into manageable lengths (4') so I would have been at it all day.
 
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TerraCrawler

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Good question. I dont carry a chainsaw because they always leak bar lube all over and take up a good bit of space. I'd just turn around. Besides, if I did have a saw, I'd be worried that I shouldn't be taking it upon myself to clear it. I figure if its land I don't own, I probably should leave stuff like that alone...a Ranger would probably bitch at me rather than thank me because I'm sure they are worried about liability, etc
Well I hope that a rangers sentiment would be better than that
four options
1) turn around
2) use an axe or hatchet
3) use a bow saw (easy to pack and relatively cheap)
4) small chain saw.

With all the beetle kill pine and high winds these days around Colorado, I carry a small 18" chain saw and a bow saw. I went down a trail not too long ago and went back the same way a couple of hours later and it had three fallen trees.
A bow saw will work for smaller trees, but be prepared to work up a sweat. Also in order to move the trees, I ended up cutting them into manageable lengths (4') so I would have been at it all day.
Its possible too, to chain, or screw a chain into the tree and pull it with a strap, winch, etc. That doesn't always work though because the tree can be pinned against other trees. But it can be good to do once a large enough section has been sawed, for moving it out of the way. What I may do is carry a chainsaw, but in the trailer. If I am without trailer, then I can keep it on the roof if I want to bring it. I hesitate to bring the chainsaw into the cabin of the truck if I don't have to. I can use one of those plastic chainsaw containers to keep it from getting messed up.
 
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TerraCrawler

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If you do decide to bring a chainsaw, for goodness sake get some chaps and some training! I almost cut my leg off with a saw. It happens so fast! 2 years later and my leg is not the same as it was.
+1 on the training part. I rarely see people using chainsaws with chaps, but I mean its not a bad idea. I would say training is more important................that said, I wear steel toes, gloves, and goggles for sure........chaps I am not convinced yet, only because I watch ALOT of chainsaw videos and its so rare to see anyone wearing chaps........but better safe than sorry
 
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+1 on the training part. I rarely see people using chainsaws with chaps, but I mean its not a bad idea. I would say training is more important................that said, I wear steel toes, gloves, and goggles for sure........chaps I am not convinced yet, only because I watch ALOT of chainsaw videos and its so rare to see anyone wearing chaps........but better safe than sorry
They might not be wearing chainsaw chaps but instead pants. In either case there are panels of loose woven Kevlar strands that are designed to stall the chain should it come in contact with your leg. If I am working all day with a saw then I wear the pants. But if I’m only going to be using it for a short while than the chaps are convenient to put on over whatever you are wearing.
 

Roam_CO85

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I was a Firefighter for US Forest Service and my main job was a sawyer Cutting down hazard trees and clearing trees and brush building fire lines. The right tools and training are a huge must have running a saw! Chaps gloves eye pro...ear pro... chaps god gave you two legs. Two eyes. Hearing...i doubt you want to lose any of them. A GOOD pair of chaps are one thing anyone should have on and training. A chain saw wound is probably one of the worst besides an arm getting caught in a baler ive ever seen!! Seen alot of people get caught in their chaps too and the Kevlar fibers stop that saw dead and you spend a few hours digging it out of the saw. Cutting some of those felled trees are pretty dangerous and can kill a person with in seconds of even a curf in a wrong spot. Even a chain derailment can cause life threatening situations. Its like carrying a firearm. If you are going to carry it please get some training. I nicked my knee cap once. Just the skin.. because i was so use to wearing chaps that one time didnt have them on an had to use the saw for three minutes. That being said I carry one just like old_man said. Here in colorado you might come in fine but going back out you might get stuck behind something. And also do alot in the winter time so not a whole lot of people have been back into those areas and winter wind with beetle kill or on the burn sights.. something small works really well. But alot of times you gotta ask your self if the juice is worth the squeeze. Being prepared is awesome. But with anything vet it. Chainsaws are are those things that its not your backyard lilac bush trim job... also that can be very dangerous
 

jimbofoxman

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I haven't been carrying one, but I have been thinking I needed to get my squared away just in case. My thought was, say you were camping one night and the next morning you found a tree in the way of getting back out..........your only way out?

Trees fall on the calmest days. I was riding my bike on a bike path (old railroad bed) and on the round trip, like 10 mins later a tree was across the trail and their was barely a breeze. Granted in this case it was just a bike and room to go under. But what if it was in the way of my truck? I can't lift a truck. You'd either have to cut it, find a way around (which may involve some clearing) or try and pull it out of the way. Last fall in the UP chasing waterfalls, if a tree would of been in the way I couldn't of gone around as I would of been stuck up to the frame is an instant because of all the rain for days.

Now I do need to get some straps for pulling stuff or stuck vehicles, I don't have that at the moment.

But that's my 2 cents.
 

TerraCrawler

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I haven't been carrying one, but I have been thinking I needed to get my squared away just in case. My thought was, say you were camping one night and the next morning you found a tree in the way of getting back out..........your only way out?

Trees fall on the calmest days. I was riding my bike on a bike path (old railroad bed) and on the round trip, like 10 mins later a tree was across the trail and their was barely a breeze. Granted in this case it was just a bike and room to go under. But what if it was in the way of my truck? I can't lift a truck. You'd either have to cut it, find a way around (which may involve some clearing) or try and pull it out of the way. Last fall in the UP chasing waterfalls, if a tree would of been in the way I couldn't of gone around as I would of been stuck up to the frame is an instant because of all the rain for days.

Now I do need to get some straps for pulling stuff or stuck vehicles, I don't have that at the moment.

But that's my 2 cents.
Sounds like you're going to be shopping one soon too............I need to find the right model, probably a Stihl, but need to find which is most ideal for felled trees.
 
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Roam_CO85

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Kickback on a saw in probably the most dangerous. You can have them anytime. Most home use saws are extremely sensitive to this because alot of the chains are just designed for downward cutting. A trail obstacle is different then just cutting firewood or even falling a tree.. that obstacle has different loading and pressure points that youve gotta be aware of. If you are gonna pack a saw take a bow or hand saw with you. Wedges and a axe
 

jimbofoxman

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Sounds like you're going to be shopping one soon too............I need to find the right model, probably a Stihl, but need to find which is most ideal for felled trees.
I have one, need to get chains sharpened and probably a tune up. I've never really liked it because I constantly have to tighten the chain. Been thinking of a new one.
 
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Roam_CO85

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Sounds like you're going to be shopping one soon too............I need to find the right model, probably a Stihl, but need to find which is most ideal for felled trees.
Stihl is the best hands down. Anything larger than a ms170 and your golden. I carried a 446 and a 660 for but those are huge saws on fires. I carry the farmboss on the overland rig. 270 can fall smaller trees with it. Hasquvarna is a good saw!

You really get what you pay for when buying them. The cheaper saws after 30
Min of use are ether making your hands fall
Asleep or falling apart. The more expensive they are the more enjoyable they become
 
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Chadlyb

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Kickback on a saw in probably the most dangerous. You can have them anytime. Most home use saws are extremely sensitive to this because alot of the chains are just designed for downward cutting. A trail obstacle is different then just cutting firewood or even falling a tree.. that obstacle has different loading and pressure points that youve gotta be aware of. If you are gonna pack a saw take a bow or hand saw with you. Wedges and a axe
Is that a chainsaw in your pocket or are you just happy to see me??!!......
 
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avgjoe624

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I carry my Stihl Wood Boss with me every time i go out on a camping or overland trip. More often than not, i dont need it. But the times i have needed it, its been there ready to go and saved my A$$.

You just have to know what youre doing and who you are... its just like swimming,, if you dont know how, then stay out of water. if you dont know how to handle a chainsaw, then dont carry one.
 

lostbutneverstuck

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We carry a chainsaw, kickback is a rare occasion and one that usually occurs with inexperience and lack of common sense. The electric chainsaws that our out these days have very good safety devices and with the use of caution and understanding of the laws of physics can be a very safe way to cut timber.
 
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Roam_CO85

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@chuckoverland how does that work? I saw dewalt has one that looks pretty neat but. Would think theyd lack power and or pretty delicate.. i normally put mine in a tote box but using it in rain storm or snow if that got wet would cause some problems.

As far as kick back it is extremely rare but have seen it happen with someone being complacent and pretty seasoned logger. Lot of saws have safety devices but just cus its rare doesn’t mean it cant happen.

Id figure a pair of chaps into the price of the saw.
 
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