Switch Rocker Panels

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adv_ranger

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Looking for some suggestions on what kind of switchboards to look into. Looking for 6-8 switches to power a light bar, air compressor, ditch lights, amber chase lights, and possibly another roof rack light bar.

I have had my eye on a switch pros rocker as well as the rough country MLC-6 panel.

It seems there are almost too many options and not too sure what I should be looking for! Any help is welcomed.
 

GordyP

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It is very well built and is easy to install. The rough country is the last one I would go with because they are a suspension company and would likely not have the dedicated expertise in this area.
 
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USStrongman

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The Rough Country unit is terrific. I am not a huge fan of RC's suspension products, but I run their 4 switch unit and installation was easy.

They are truly all about the same until you look at the LED touchscreen units available from SPOD. The minor differences are mountability for some vehicles and gauge wiring can vary.
 
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adv_ranger

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The Rough Country unit is terrific. I am not a huge fan of RC's suspension products, but I run their 4 switch unit and installation was easy.

They are truly all about the same until you look at the LED touchscreen units available from SPOD. The minor differences are mountability for some vehicles and gauge wiring can vary.
I know that Rough Country has awesome mounting options (both for in the cab and the engine bay) for jeeps, but I't not sure where I could mount it in my engine bay.
 

Defender 90 Keith

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Could you maybe link to where you bought that switch panel? Looks legit!
sure no problem! Its a UK company called "MUD Uk". I've attached the link to the particular switch panel I have but there are a couple of others on their site. you might find something that suits you.


 
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LostWoods

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Switch Pros if price is a concern. sPOD is great but the Bantam is quite expensive by comparison. Both are used in very abusive racing environments so they'll hold up just fine.

The downside to solid state units like SP and the Bantam are that when they go, they may take down the entire unit and there are no serviceable parts. You don't need relays or fuses with the unit unless you're driving something high amperage like a larger compressor - that also means when something breaks, you now need to find a new way to control and power the circuit.

The Rough Country, older sPOD, and other similar designs are good in that when something dies, it's likely the relay or fuse and they're easily serviceable. Failing that, you will already have control wires run and can easily switch around circuits or create a bypass in a pinch.
 

kwill

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The Rough Country unit is terrific. I am not a huge fan of RC's suspension products, but I run their 4 switch unit and installation was easy
Link?
 

kwill

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I was hoping for the 4 switch system referred to above ("but I run their 4 switch unit."). I don't need 6 switches but cannot find a system that offers less than 6.
 

adv_ranger

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I was hoping for the 4 switch system referred to above ("but I run their 4 switch unit."). I don't need 6 switches but cannot find a system that offers less than 6.
I don't think they make that unit anymore. But hey for $200 its worth it! The fuses are all 30amp as well instead of varying like in the SPOD which is almost $800 by comparison.
 
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Deshi

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I to have this same dilemma. I am considering the RC unit but I don't plan on running 6 different accessories. My fridge is and always will be directly wired to the battery, I want a relay system that is keyed as I don't have any need for aux driving lights when not driving. Won't wire up "camp lights" to it as I use small battery powered lanterns for that. I like the mobility of lanterns. Also don't plant on wiring in a ton of stuff. No need for it. Lastly, I don't have room for a ton of switches. Ha. Thinking making my own might be the route to go.
 

LostWoods

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I to have this same dilemma. I am considering the RC unit but I don't plan on running 6 different accessories. My fridge is and always will be directly wired to the battery, I want a relay system that is keyed as I don't have any need for aux driving lights when not driving. Won't wire up "camp lights" to it as I use small battery powered lanterns for that. I like the mobility of lanterns. Also don't plant on wiring in a ton of stuff. No need for it. Lastly, I don't have room for a ton of switches. Ha. Thinking making my own might be the route to go.
The RC is so cheap it's what I generally recommend to anyone who is price-conscious but I like building my own just because I want to know what's going into the system and how it's constructed. Hell I even chopped up the official Mopar aux switch harness on my Gladiator so that I can build out a solution that fits my needs. Those power switched circuits and I have a 4-gang fuse block behind the glove box for my 24/7 circuits like the rear 12v and radios.

If you do build your own, I highly recommend GEP for a fuse/relay block. Works similarly to the Bussmann blocks with Metripack 280 sealed terminals but they come with better mounting styles and more size options. Construction feels better as well.
 

Boostpowered

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Painless wiring will put together anything you want, but I would diy with my own parts though, If you diy you will learn what's going on so if there is a problem its easily fixed by you. You can use common relays and fuses and switches found at about any automotive store which makes things much easier than waiting months for a company to fix things for you. If you don't understand 12v wiring go to the 12volt.com and spend some time looking at wiring diagrams
 
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Deshi

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I have a Painless Trail Rocker I purchased awhile ago for another project and never installed it. I like Painless stuff but I just don't need that many circuits. Don't add that many accessories. Building my own is probably the route to go. Simple 3-4 circuit panel, small, light weight, easy, serviceable....just hard to justify sometimes due to the cost of some of these kits.
 

Boostpowered

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I have a Painless Trail Rocker I purchased awhile ago for another project and never installed it. I like Painless stuff but I just don't need that many circuits. Don't add that many accessories. Building my own is probably the route to go. Simple 3-4 circuit panel, small, light weight, easy, serviceable....just hard to justify sometimes due to the cost of some of these kits.
It would be fairly easy and cheap to make your own.

 

KonzaLander

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Painless wiring will put together anything you want, but I would diy with my own parts though, If you diy you will learn what's going on so if there is a problem its easily fixed by you.
This right here, in my opinion, is the most sound advice you should heed when doing modifications to your vehicle.

What happens when you are far from civilization and the electrical device you rely on quits getting power? Do you know how it is controlled/powered/switched/fused to troubleshoot and fix it? DIY is great since you are forced to understand exactly how the electrical system works.