Swing away hitch mount

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grubworm

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I have a Tundra with a shell on it and a drawer system. I need to lower the tailgate to access the drawers and I need a hitch mount carrier for extra fuel cans. I don't want to unload the cans every time I need to access the drawers, so I found a swing away mount that will simply swing over to the side and allow the tailgate to be lowered.

There are several brands and I am wondering if anyone on here has experience with one of these units...I would like to get some opinions prior to purchasing one.

Here's a pic of one brand used for bike hauling....

1611424986831.png
 

bgenlvtex

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I have a Rocky Mounts Back Stage like pictured. It is a very nice carrier, but it is nowhere even near heavy duty enough to handle more than 50 or so pounds. My advice would be to reversa engineer one using heavier materials.

I would however be concerned with the totality of the weight hanging off of the back of the truck.
 
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grubworm

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I have a Rocky Mounts Back Stage like pictured. It is a very nice carrier, but it is nowhere even near heavy duty enough to handle more than 50 or so pounds. My advice would be to reversa engineer one using heavier materials.

I would however be concerned with the totality of the weight hanging off of the back of the truck.
yeah, that was a concern. i'm planning 2 jerry cans, so that's 100# with fuel, cans, mounts, etc. and being extended out like that will be a lot of force on the pivot, which i'm sure would be the weakest link in the thing.

thanks for the feedback...
 
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Boort

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yeah, that was a concern. i'm planning 2 jerry cans, so that's 100# with fuel, cans, mounts, etc. and being extended out like that will be a lot of force on the pivot, which i'm sure would be the weakest link in the thing.

thanks for the feedback...
Check out the RIGD Ultraswing series. I saw it on @Rick Louie rig and after following him on the trail for a weekend at the first BVJJ I'd say it was rock solid! I saw that they now have a Mega version for fullsize rigs and vans. I think they are rated to 200-250lbs and with the dual hitch setup can still tow up to 10k. I've seen them accessorised with rotopax, tables, bikes, and maxtrax but you'll need to check on regular Jerry can mounts.

There is also the Wilco unit which others here have but in'm not sure if they offer a unit for fullsize rigs.

Boort
 

grubworm

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Check out the RIGD Ultraswing series. I saw it on @Rick Louie rig and after following him on the trail for a weekend at the first BVJJ I'd say it was rock solid! I saw that they now have a Mega version for fullsize rigs and vans. I think they are rated to 200-250lbs and with the dual hitch setup can still tow up to 10k. I've seen them accessorised with rotopax, tables, bikes, and maxtrax but you'll need to check on regular Jerry can mounts.

There is also the Wilco unit which others here have but in'm not sure if they offer a unit for fullsize rigs.

Boort
thanks, @Boort ....now that's a beefy unit! glad you mentioned Rigid again because i saw that unit a while back and somehow thought it bolted to the bumper and so i skipped over it. its a hitch mount and a sturdy one according to all the reviews.

that's definitely in the realm i'm looking in
 

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I have the Wilco Hitch Tire Carrier with gas cans attached. It swings all the way out and out of the way so I can lower the tailgate. I believe the extra clearance to go all the way was even extra $$.
 

grubworm

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while checking out the Rigd carrier, i came across a manufacturer in Oregon called StowAway and they have a similar swing out unit also rated for 250# but theirs is $300 and the Rigid is $1300. i'm sure the Rigid is beefier and stronger and built for rougher traveling while supporting all that weight, but i'm in a pretty much stock tundra, so i wont be doing a lot of bouncing and hopefully the $300 unit will suffice.

appreciate the replies and if anyone else is ever interested in a swing out hitch, i'll let you know how this one works

1611436495653.png

 

Solo Saga

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etrailer.com lists three more options (search swing-away hitch adapter): Yakima "Backswing," $299, 250lbs; Thule "Access," $349.95, 350lbs; Kuat "Pivot 2," $349, 250lb. They are all marketed toward bicycle carry, but the weight rating is what it is. I am seriously considering the Thule.


I similarly have a pickup, and just want a temporary swing out to carry extra fuel. I don't want to carry a permanent solution since the truck is in "work mode' 90% of the time.
 

grubworm

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etrailer.com lists three more options (search swing-away hitch adapter): Yakima "Backswing," $299, 250lbs; Thule "Access," $349.95, 350lbs; Kuat "Pivot 2," $349, 250lb. They are all marketed toward bicycle carry, but the weight rating is what it is. I am seriously considering the Thule.


I similarly have a pickup, and just want a temporary swing out to carry extra fuel. I don't want to carry a permanent solution since the truck is in "work mode' 90% of the time.
damn...all three of those look good. i'm like you as far as just needing temporary fuel storage and since we are camping and sleeping in the camper shell, sure dont want gas inside, and its too much weight and hassle for my cargo basket on top, so there is just this option left.
 

Solo Saga

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etrailer.com lists three more options (search swing-away hitch adapter): Yakima "Backswing," $299, 250lbs; Thule "Access," $349.95, 350lbs; Kuat "Pivot 2," $349, 250lb. They are all marketed toward bicycle carry, but the weight rating is what it is. I am seriously considering the Thule.


I similarly have a pickup, and just want a temporary swing out to carry extra fuel. I don't want to carry a permanent solution since the truck is in "work mode' 90% of the time.
damn...all three of those look good. i'm like you as far as just needing temporary fuel storage and since we are camping and sleeping in the camper shell, sure dont want gas inside, and its too much weight and hassle for my cargo basket on top, so there is just this option left.
Yeah, same situation here all around.

Lots of choices make for a tough decision. I figured I'd add a DIY reinforced raised $49 Harbor Freight UTV basket. 10gal. of fuel, plus all the weight of the carrier equipment is well below the weight rating of any of the choices here. I do like the extra insurance of the Thule to compensate for any added force from "bouncing" off-road, though.
 
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Peregrine

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I have a Tundra with a shell on it and a drawer system. I need to lower the tailgate to access the drawers and I need a hitch mount carrier for extra fuel cans. I don't want to unload the cans every time I need to access the drawers, so I found a swing away mount that will simply swing over to the side and allow the tailgate to be lowered.

There are several brands and I am wondering if anyone on here has experience with one of these units...I would like to get some opinions prior to purchasing one.

Here's a pic of one brand used for bike hauling....

View attachment 185072
On my list also. Currently looking at: RIGd Supply
 
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grubworm

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On my list also. Currently looking at: RIGd Supply
yeah, that Rigd does look nice. I was wondering why there is a $1000 difference in price between Ridg and the Stowaway. I ordered the Stowaway and it is supposed to arrive Monday, so when it gets in I'll check it out and see how well its made. I'll get back to you with the info.
i obviously wont be able to compare it to the Rigd, but will be able to tell if its good or not.
i was looking at Yakima cargo baskets for $700 when i came across the Tyger brand out of southern california. it was $300 cheaper than Yakima and i was able to compare the two and the Tyger brand was cheaper and actually a lot better built, so maybe i'll get lucky again with this hitch.
 
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Peregrine

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yeah, that Rigd does look nice. I was wondering why there is a $1000 difference in price between Ridg and the Stowaway. I ordered the Stowaway and it is supposed to arrive Monday, so when it gets in I'll check it out and see how well its made. I'll get back to you with the info.
i obviously wont be able to compare it to the Rigd, but will be able to tell if its good or not.
i was looking at Yakima cargo baskets for $700 when i came across the Tyger brand out of southern california. it was $300 cheaper than Yakima and i was able to compare the two and the Tyger brand was cheaper and actually a lot better built, so maybe i'll get lucky again with this hitch.
Called "Charge what the market will bear." I have noticed most everything is grouped together in pricing. For me the pricing had a habit of moving many things to the "nice to have list". I also work my must have and nice to have lists using the local auctions. Estate sales are great. Just picked up a 2004 XC90 for $500. Needed a new roof liner and oil seal. All fixed and going of the sales block to continue my overland build.
 
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old_man

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I have built several bumper mount swing outs over the years. They mainly were used for a large tire and or jerry cans. For rock crawling, the stresses are multiplied. We used trailer spindles for the hinge, and even then, we snapped them off. Most hitches are simply not strong enough to handle the torsional loads without bending and eventually cracking. Mine have all been welded to a very stout bumper.
 

grubworm

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I have built several bumper mount swing outs over the years. They mainly were used for a large tire and or jerry cans. For rock crawling, the stresses are multiplied. We used trailer spindles for the hinge, and even then, we snapped them off. Most hitches are simply not strong enough to handle the torsional loads without bending and eventually cracking. Mine have all been welded to a very stout bumper.
yeah, great point. i certainly dont go off into anything too difficult, but even bouncy roads might be an issue. i went with the cheaper one (still has a 250# rating) because i mainly just need it for the one time and if it works, great...if not, i'll mount it to a work bench in my shop and use it as a swing out shelf or something.
the swing out is a great idea, but if you were using trailer spindles and having problems, i'm sure what i bought is going to be a LOT weaker. so i'm just going with 2-3 cans on it and nothing more and hope for the best
 

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yeah, great point. i certainly dont go off into anything too difficult, but even bouncy roads might be an issue. i went with the cheaper one (still has a 250# rating) because i mainly just need it for the one time and if it works, great...if not, i'll mount it to a work bench in my shop and use it as a swing out shelf or something.
the swing out is a great idea, but if you were using trailer spindles and having problems, i'm sure what i bought is going to be a LOT weaker. so i'm just going with 2-3 cans on it and nothing more and hope for the best
Being an engineer and fabricator, let me set the record straight. Most manufacturers ratings are for a static load. That means when sitting still. Vibrations, washboard roads, and drop offs can multiply the forces many times over. These are called dynamic or shock loads. You can get by with an occasional shock load, but the effect tends to be cumulative and cause long term damage/failure. Just to illustrate shock loads, I walked the rear tire off a ledge too fast and dropped my vehicle on the bumper. I over built the bumper and tied it back into the frame 18". When I got home I noticed a pronounced ripple in the right rear quarter panel due to the frame flexing. Another time slowly dropped the front tire over sharp ledge. When it slammed down on the frame, my unpitted windshield shattered. The design of a rear mount is critical. The farther away from the mount point the load is attached multiplies the torque (force). Rear tire carriers are notorious for massive shaking, indicating large forces. That is why I don't run a rear mount, even though I can easily fab up another. A rear mount should have at least 2 hinge points separated by a significant distance. This precludes opening a hatch without a fully articulated arm to get it out of the way. While having everything up high looks cool, it leads to shaking and magnifies shock loads. People get away with them but I have probably done a half dozen trailside weld fixes on them in the last 20 years.
 

grubworm

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Being an engineer and fabricator, let me set the record straight. Most manufacturers ratings are for a static load. That means when sitting still. Vibrations, washboard roads, and drop offs can multiply the forces many times over. These are called dynamic or shock loads. You can get by with an occasional shock load, but the effect tends to be cumulative and cause long term damage/failure. Just to illustrate shock loads, I walked the rear tire off a ledge too fast and dropped my vehicle on the bumper. I over built the bumper and tied it back into the frame 18". When I got home I noticed a pronounced ripple in the right rear quarter panel due to the frame flexing. Another time slowly dropped the front tire over sharp ledge. When it slammed down on the frame, my unpitted windshield shattered. The design of a rear mount is critical. The farther away from the mount point the load is attached multiplies the torque (force). Rear tire carriers are notorious for massive shaking, indicating large forces. That is why I don't run a rear mount, even though I can easily fab up another. A rear mount should have at least 2 hinge points separated by a significant distance. This precludes opening a hatch without a fully articulated arm to get it out of the way. While having everything up high looks cool, it leads to shaking and magnifies shock loads. People get away with them but I have probably done a half dozen trailside weld fixes on them in the last 20 years.
definitely appreciate your input. losing a hitch rack and gas cans on the trail would be bad, but i'm way more worried about it holding up with bumps and dips in the highway...having that come lose and hit a car behind me would be a disaster. i'm going to test it out well before getting on the road with it.

while i have you here....i have a 35ah battery in my camper shell to run lights and a small water pump. i would like to charge it with the trucks elec system and was wondering what you think about tying into the wiring harness of the 7 pin trailer connector and hot tapping into the 12v wire and using that to charge the 2nd battery.
 

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definitely appreciate your input. losing a hitch rack and gas cans on the trail would be bad, but i'm way more worried about it holding up with bumps and dips in the highway...having that come lose and hit a car behind me would be a disaster. i'm going to test it out well before getting on the road with it.

while i have you here....i have a 35ah battery in my camper shell to run lights and a small water pump. i would like to charge it with the trucks elec system and was wondering what you think about tying into the wiring harness of the 7 pin trailer connector and hot tapping into the 12v wire and using that to charge the 2nd battery.
Grub what kind of truck d'you have again?
 

old_man

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definitely appreciate your input. losing a hitch rack and gas cans on the trail would be bad, but i'm way more worried about it holding up with bumps and dips in the highway...having that come lose and hit a car behind me would be a disaster. i'm going to test it out well before getting on the road with it.

while i have you here....i have a 35ah battery in my camper shell to run lights and a small water pump. i would like to charge it with the trucks elec system and was wondering what you think about tying into the wiring harness of the 7 pin trailer connector and hot tapping into the 12v wire and using that to charge the 2nd battery.
As long as it is a 12v battery it should be fine. I do however recommend an automotive circuit breaker in case of short or failure.