Specialty coffee setups (ultra coffee snobbery)

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overland.productions

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I put that Triple Tree coffee grinder to work this past weekend. I found that turning the handle slower yielded a better grind. It took me the same amount of time to grind the beans manually as it took the water to heat at 195 degrees minimum. I can see how it becomes a ritual to grind beans while the sun comes up and the water boils.
 
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Road

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I put that Triple Tree coffee grinder to work this past weekend. I found that turning the handle slower yielded a better grind. It took me the same amount of time to grind the beans manually as it took the water to heat at 195 degrees minimum. I can see how it becomes a ritual to grind beans while the sun comes up and the water boils.
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Awesome; glad you like it! They're funky little grinders and who is offering them online depends on who has the same thing in stock, evidently. The Triple Tree is unavailable right now, for example. There are several other outfits, though, selling the same exact one under other names.

Yeah, grinding coffee fresh from beans can become one of those meditative rituals that becomes part of your day. Little simple pleasures that often--with the help of a good cup of coffee--start the day right.

I've been looking at this simple manual grinder too, for packing easier in my adventure kitchen box, as well as easier in a pack for bike and canoe overnights: JavaPresse Manual Coffee Grinder. Anyone have any experience with it?

I might just get it anyway. Another hand-cranked manual grind, with even more settings to adjust how fine or coarse; has ceramic burrs, etc.
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overland.productions

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I might just get it anyway. Another hand-cranked manual grind, with even more settings to adjust how fine or coarse; has ceramic burrs, etc.
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The settings are interesting. I did hope the grinds would be more coarse than they turned out to be. Found very few grinds in the bottom of my cup.
 
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cascadiarunner

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I used my aeropress for a year or two, which is fine when it's just me and my girlfriend, but it got to be too much of a hassle as we nearly always camp with friends these days. I have a metal filter I use with it, not for convenience (which it is) but I like the taste better, paper tends to absorb the oils. Nowadays I mostly use a 50 oz stainless steel french press, which works out well when it's 4 of us. I'm also one of those snobs who keeps a digital scale in my camping gear :laughing:

Brewing down by the river two weeks ago on our first trip of the year:

 

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The settings are interesting. I did hope the grinds would be more coarse than they turned out to be. Found very few grinds in the bottom of my cup.
.

You should be able to adjust the grind settings on yours by removing the handle and metal keeper over the cogged wheel, then turning the wheel to any of 7 settings. Sometimes you have to hold the threaded stem as you turn the wheel to set. You can see it lower and raise the ceramic burr down in there to allow more or less ground bean to pass through.

coffeegrinder.png

For a little $15 manual coffee grinder, it really does do a nice job, especially if off-road/off-grid with no power for electric grinders. The companies that offer them on amzn and elsewhere vary constantly, though they all seem made in the same place; just privately labeled.

I did get one of the JavaPresse Manual Grinders, too, to compare (supposed to show up today), but more because it weighs less and fits my packs better for overnights on foot or with bike or canoe. It too is simple; the two parts just slide together and are held together by one hand while the other turns the handle. I'm hoping the handle fits into one of the halves, then I'll pack the other half with a ziploc of beans.

javapresse-800.png

Fresh ground coffee in camp; little pleasures that often start the day off just right.

The difference in aroma and taste really is remarkable over bags of pre-ground and even more over instant, coffee bags or keurig-style.
To be able to achieve that difference with an inexpensive manual grinder is well worth bringing one along when adventuring.

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When I am on the motorcycle I often use instant to save the space. I used a stainless steal percolator for years and these days I often use the Stanley All -In-One Coffee System. If you want to check it out I posted a video featuring it on my YouTube page-

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Hey, this was an entirely awesome video, @Ragman!

I'm not sure how I missed it earlier, but glad I found it now. How cool, that you followed through on doing what you said you would on a 5º morning at 04:30. Even cooler that you honored both your buddy and the last year's suffering of so many.

I'd never seen the Stanley All-In-One coffee press set ups before, though have used their cooking gear and thermoses on and off for years.

This is the 2nd vid of yours I've thoroughly enjoyed by just stumbling upon, though did not realize it was you 'til I went to your channel.
Very cool; you have a great way of presenting things you know about and have taught yourself.
.
 
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Old Tanker

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When I am on the motorcycle I often use instant to save the space. I used a stainless steal percolator for years and these days I often use the Stanley All -In-One Coffee System. If you want to check it out I posted a video featuring it on my YouTube page-

That was an interesting video. Thanks, and congratulations on your retirement.
 
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KadenVentures

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It took me a while to figure out the coffee perfect setup for me and the wife. We tried French Presses, percolators and insta coffee but HATED cleaning French presses and perculators on the road and most insta coffees werent good. We switched into the coffee Pour over game and never looked back! We loved this setup so much that we now have a pour over Chemex system in our house!

Easy to make (1 to 3 cups of coffee)
Quick to Clean
Minimal (multifunctional) gear

 
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overland.productions

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You should be able to adjust the grind settings on yours by removing the handle and metal keeper over the cogged wheel, then turning the wheel to any of 7 settings. Sometimes you have to hold the threaded stem as you turn the wheel to set. You can see it lower and raise the ceramic burr down in there to allow more or less ground bean to pass through.

View attachment 192706

For a little $15 manual coffee grinder, it really does do a nice job, especially if off-road/off-grid with no power for electric grinders. The companies that offer them on amzn and elsewhere vary constantly, though they all seem made in the same place; just privately labeled.
.
I made a few adjustments and I think it's just about dialed in. The slightly coarser grind makes for quick work of the beans. It doesn't take nearly as long. It has a snug fitting spot in my Goose Gear drawer and I'm sticking with this system for the rest of this year.
 
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El-Dracho

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A good cup of coffee is essential for me, be it in the morning at camp or while on the road. So I have different setups while on the road. I love the bialetti moka and the french press which both make quite a nice brew. By the way, I use also instant coffee while being out and even at home. I have to admit, that here are some quite good quality instant coffees on the market.

For me it is also always great to stop at a small cafe or similar and have a coffee there. On the one hand there are so many interesting ways of making coffee and coffee preparation in the world and on the other hand it is always nice to chat with some locals and get to know even more about the area and the people living there.
 

Ragman

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A good cup of coffee is essential for me, be it in the morning at camp or while on the road. So I have different setups while on the road. I love the bialetti moka and the french press which both make quite a nice brew. By the way, I use also instant coffee while being out and even at home. I have to admit, that here are some quite good quality instant coffees on the market.

For me it is also always great to stop at a small cafe or similar and have a coffee there. On the one hand there are so many interesting ways of making coffee and coffee preparation in the world and on the other hand it is always nice to chat with some locals and get to know even more about the area and the people living there.
Any good instant coffee brands that you would recommend? I am also a fan of the local cafe scene when traveling-always interesting to chat with and watch the comings and goings of the locals.
 
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Peregrine

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Did the coffee pot dance and settled on a Bialetti Moka Expresso Maker. Fast, easy with minimal cleanup. Just water in the pot. Ground coffee in the filter cup. Bring just to a boil and pour. Clean up is fast and easy. Shake out coffee grounds and rinse all with a little water.
 

El-Dracho

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Any good instant coffee brands that you would recommend? I am also a fan of the local cafe scene when traveling-always interesting to chat with and watch the comings and goings of the locals.
Mmmhh, I always change the brands and varieties from time to time, sometimes Nescafe Classic, sometimes Jacobs Gold or Kroenung... I don't always want to drink the same thing. I think taste is so different, everyone must try it out for themselves.
 

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Okay, going out on a limb, but I've found that pre-made coffee works just fine. A gallon of pre-made takes up the same amount of space that a gallon of water would, plus no need for all the other stuff. It can be enjoyed hot or cold (think Starbucks Frappaccino). YMMV
 

ClayAkers

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I would also check out at Moka Pot (some people call it a stovetop espresso maker) if you want to avoid paper filters, however it's not the most energy efficient way of making coffee if fuel is a concern.
X2 on the Moka Pot. I’ve got the large (I think it’s a 9 cup) size and it works great for two cups of coffee. I grind the beans coarse (like for a French press) so it’s not too strong or silty. The pot is all aluminum, so it’s lightweight and durable.
 

Ragman

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Okay, going out on a limb, but I've found that pre-made coffee works just fine. A gallon of pre-made takes up the same amount of space that a gallon of water would, plus no need for all the other stuff. It can be enjoyed hot or cold (think Starbucks Frappaccino). YMMV
Now that is a thought-in warmer weather brew up a gallon of cold brew-the stuff I make is mixed 1:2 with water-you would get a good amount of coffee that way-brilliant!