Specialty coffee setups (ultra coffee snobbery)

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ruralpunk

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Wondering if there are any other specialty coffee aficionados there and what you're setup is.

I'm rocking my Aeropress. It's just too perfect for travel. If I'm backpacking I will pre weigh the beans and package them in individual tiny ziploc bags, but if I'm overlanding I'll bring my scale. I have one of those adorable handgrinders that fit inside the Aeropress that I have as well.

I would love to get a travel pour over but my v60/Chemex are all glass, so I might buy a plastic v60 for the rig.

What are you rocking?
 
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FishinCrzy

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My current favorite is a stainless steel mesh pour over. It's great but I think it takes too much water to clean it in the field. Tried using a paper filter to aid cleanup, meh. I need to rig up a pressurized bottle to knock the grinds out? My hand grinder has heavy glass container. Bulky but not worried about breaking it. I must have a dozen presses, machines, and other contraptions that rarely get used. Need to six my old Mr. Coffees to make room in the cabinet! If it gets any better than my current pour over I'm not sure I want to try it. Except for convenience of course.

If I am really remote and wanting to travel light my fall back is the Folgers tea bag deals that really is not a bad cup of coffee for short term use. Any coffee is better than no coffee right!? The Aeropress looks interesting. Having to keep up with paper filters is a bit of a pain maybe. I did see a mesh filter that one can get with it. Which grinder is it that fits inside? I probably need another setup! Getting out the door with all the little creature comforts seems to take days of planning and packing. But, lawd, don't forget the coffee! I went out the other day and forgot my Kindle reader. I ended up cutting my trip a little short because I didn't have it. Such a slave to my habits!
 
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ruralpunk

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You should definitely check out the Aeropress, cleanup is insanely easy, check out a YouTube video on it, its truly an amazing little device. Attached are photos of the Aeropress and the grinder, there are a ton of different brands in the same form factor.

I would also check out at Moka Pot (some people call it a stovetop espresso maker) if you want to avoid paper filters, however it's not the most energy efficient way of making coffee if fuel is a concern.
 

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Road

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There's a bunch of coffee making threads on here, though I've never jumped in on them before, I don't think.

I've used all sorts of things to make coffee while wandering, from paper filters to French Press, old-style percolators, to throw-it-all-in cowboy style, to stainless 1 cup pour overs.

Then, a couple years ago, a friend came to camp and brought his family. His wife is from Central or South America and had a Colador. A simple cloth strainer of close weave cotton around a wire rim, with handle. She made quick, simple, and delicious coffee and kept a pot all day long.

She gave me the Colador (Spanish for strainer) when they left. I used it 'til it was about worn out, then went searching for more. Now I buy them by the six pack and keep a couple in my van and chuck box, and a couple in the kitchen wherever I'm staying. I just ordered more and see the last six pack I bought was July 2019, to give you an idea how long they last. That's 19 months for five (just got the last one out this morning for these pics), and that's with making a cup for myself every single day, and my kid making coffee with hers like 3-5 times a week.

colador_5059-700.jpeg . colador_5060-700.jpeg
Left: 2 Coladors, one brand new and clean, and one well-used and steeping in a travel mug. Right: Manual Coffee Mill Grinder and two Coladors ready to use (one with grounds still in, drying for ease of cleaning).

A couple tips for longevity and better coffee with these:

- I use them inside out, so the hem and stitching is on the outside. Much easier to clean the grounds out that way, and less fussing and strain on the seam when cleaning, so longer lasting. That's typically where they eventually fail.
- I like using a level measure (in image below) for 16oz travel mug size and letting it steep about 4 minutes. The measure says 36cc / 1oz, so I have no earthly idea where it came from originally.
- I usually leave the grounds in the Colador after making coffee, then put it somewhere convenient to dry (see photo above). It is really easy then to dump the dry grounds out by turning it out (much easier than dumping wet and trying to rinse, as well as conserves a ton of water), brush it clean with my hand, turn it back in, and use.
- Every once in a while give it a thorough rinse in really hot water to keep the rim from getting too dark, stiff, and brittle and to just clean the whole thing better. I use no soap or detergent on these, ever.

Using these is not as wasteful as paper filters, though fresh paper filters will help keep coffee oils rom appearing on the top of your coffee. To be honest, I'm not enough of a coffee snob to notice the difference in taste between a fresh paper filter and a well-used cloth one.

What I really like about these Coladors is that they are super simple to use for either a big pot or a cup (they can hold a lot of ground coffee), so you're not making several separate cups with a 1 cup pour over; you can use any grind from coarse to fine; it fits right into my travel mug for daily use, so no extra stand or holder needed, takes up no room at all in my kit or if backpacking, and makes really nice simple gifts for camp guests.


coffee_5061-900.jpeg
Preferred coffee these days; sometimes already ground, sometimes whole bean: Cameron's Toasted Southern Pecan, Dark Skies whole beans, Black Thunder from Coffee By Design.

** If anyone lives near an HEB and wants to pick up six pkgs of Texas Pecan for me and ship it, I'll gladly send the pesos and shipping cost. Too expensive on Amzn compared to in-store HEB.

To grind, I really like a simple Manual Coffee Mill Grinder (in right top image) with ceramic burrs, adjustable grind, and extra container for storing fresh grounds. I don't usually take that on the road, but am thinking of getting another to throw in my van's coffee kit.

.
 

ruralpunk

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that's a nice set up you've got there @Road I've had mixed results with the cloth filters, but if you've found what works for you that's awesome. Personally (and coffee is very personal) I love nothing more that a heavily filtered clear cup, so my Chemex with its thick paper filters is my daily driver. Also, I'd be remiss if I didn't show off my shipment that just arrived this morning from Revolver. As you can see I like my coffee fruity and dramatic (not unlike myself).
 

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FishinCrzy

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Now, dammit! Ya'll gonna send me down another coffee rabbit hole! Sometimes all that motivates me to get out of bed is the thought of a good cuppa.

Corandor ordered! Already had the Manual Mill Coffee Grinder.
 
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Road

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that's a nice set up you've got there @Road I've had mixed results with the cloth filters, but if you've found what works for you that's awesome. Personally (and coffee is very personal) I love nothing more that a heavily filtered clear cup, so my Chemex with its thick paper filters is my daily driver. Also, I'd be remiss if I didn't show off my shipment that just arrived this morning from Revolver. As you can see I like my coffee fruity and dramatic (not unlike myself).
It's not much of a setup, really; just a cloth coffee sock!

I suppose if I was home more (and not as space conscious), I might very well go for a glass or plastic carafe/filter holder deal like the Chemex. I used to haul around a glass French Press, a stainless pour over, then a GSI plastic camp French Press with stainless inside parts, and in the long run find the simpler and fewer parts to store, use, and clean, the better.

I can keep a Colador in a pocket of my day pack for canoe or bike ride picnics, and need no holder of any kind other than the cup the coffee's being brewed in. I enjoy, too, the challenge when camping to see just how efficient, sustainable, and least waste-producing I can be.

All comes down to preferences and what suits an individual's taste for extra gear, etc.
 

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I use a GSI Commuter JavaPress travel mug - basically a French press inside an insulated travel mug. Put a scoop of pre-ground beans in, add hot water, steep, press, enjoy. Works well enough for me.

If I want to be fancy, I'll bring my Hario v60 glass dripper, a grinder, filters, and a mug but, I try to keep things as simple as possible when out-and-about - if I can eliminate extemporaneous parts/pieces and trash-generating items, I do where possible.

Freshly ground beans in a pour-over makes a better brew, but, I'm not too picky. I'll drink instant if it's all I've got.
 
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Road I like your setup!

I love a good cup of coffee (or 3). It I really don’t want to make it a ritual, particularly first thing in the morning.

One question, do you just put the whole bag into your cup and let it sit there for 4 minutes then take it out?

Thanks.
 
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I have been using the Jet Boil for several years and now that they have added a silicone gasket it does a good job of keeping my coffee from being full of grounds like the old version. The Jet Boil is a great coffee solution as it packs into itself including the stove and press. It is also very quick to come to boil, insulated (ok kinda insulated), and not hard to clean.

When cooking a full breakfast it also keeps my 2 burner stove available for a griddle or a couple of pans while still being able to make more coffee. If I am not pulling out the full stove, the jet boil is super fast at getting oatmeal or any dehydrated meal going.
 

Alanymarce

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Handpresso in the vehicle, with Aeropress as a back-up and can be used when walking ("hiking") more than a day, and hence no electrical power is available. The "colador" is pretty much a standard piece of equipment where we live and it's a good option too.
 
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ruralpunk

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I have been using the Jet Boil for several years and now that they have added a silicone gasket it does a good job of keeping my coffee from being full of grounds like the old version. The Jet Boil is a great coffee solution as it packs into itself including the stove and press. It is also very quick to come to boil, insulated (ok kinda insulated), and not hard to clean.

When cooking a full breakfast it also keeps my 2 burner stove available for a griddle or a couple of pans while still being able to make more coffee. If I am not pulling out the full stove, the jet boil is super fast at getting oatmeal or any dehydrated meal going.
I love my jet boil, its quicker and more effecant that any traditional burner stove (but its obvioulsy a one trick pony, boils water). I use it to heat the water for my Aeropress.
 
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bgenlvtex

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I have been using the Jet Boil for several years and now that they have added a silicone gasket it does a good job of keeping my coffee from being full of grounds like the old version. The Jet Boil is a great coffee solution as it packs into itself including the stove and press. It is also very quick to come to boil, insulated (ok kinda insulated), and not hard to clean.

When cooking a full breakfast it also keeps my 2 burner stove available for a griddle or a couple of pans while still being able to make more coffee. If I am not pulling out the full stove, the jet boil is super fast at getting oatmeal or any dehydrated meal going.
I don't know what you carry your Jetboil in, but my Flash, 2- 230gram gas canisters, a propane adaptor, French press, folding utensil set all fit very neatly in the Maxpedition 12x5
 

Road

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Road I like your setup!

I love a good cup of coffee (or 3). It I really don’t want to make it a ritual, particularly first thing in the morning.

One question, do you just put the whole bag into your cup and let it sit there for 4 minutes then take it out?

Thanks.
Heya @smlobx, I didn't know you'd posted a question for me. Add the @ to a name and they get notified they've been mentioned.

Yep, as seen in the image, the coffee sock fits a travel mug, or any mug really, just right. They're sized for it. You can see from the new clean white one that it is about as tall as the travel mug, so may be cumbersome to use in a regular house mug or coffee cup. I dump the dry grounds from the day before if still in there, brush it clean, turn it seam side out again and stick it in my travel mug, then measure new grounds in.

Pour almost-boiling water over, steep, then pull it up, let it drain completely into your mug, then place somewhere to let it drip and dry. If camping, I just put it in an aluminum cup I always have on my counter. If home, I stick the handle into the dish strainer so it's leveraged out over the sink to drip any final drops. Then I stick it up in the tall glass container as shown below to dry. It's a lot easier to let the grounds dry before emptying and cleaning and uses no water that way. Important when camping in the desert as much as I do. Water's too precious to waste that much cleaning a coffee sock.

There are stands available that will hold it over a pot of cup that you can see two styles of in the images here: Colador six packs. I just rig something in camp if making a pot for company. Otherwise, I rarely make more than the 16oz for my travel mug so don't need a stand or holder.

colador_5059-700.jpeg
Clean and new on left. | Well used and in the mug brewing on right

colador_5060-700.jpeg
Convenient place to stash them to let the grounds dry before emptying and brushing clean with my hand. Much easier than dumping wet grounds and running water.

It's sure not fancy, but boy it makes good coffee and is the simplest, easiest, way for me.
 
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ruralpunk

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Some nice setups in this thread! I clearly need to re-evaluate my life.

View attachment 188704
I'm not here to try to shame anyone on their coffee habits, I know I take it to an extreme (I just spent $90 on 750g of coffee), but I definitely encourage you improving upon your coffee game and if you have any questions or anything let me know. My coffee hobby is probably bigger than my 4 wheeling/camping hobby.

If you like instant coffee, you can actually get high(er) quality instant that what folders or maxwell house will sell you. I'm a big fan of the ritual of making a brew but something like that might be a better solution for you, at least while you're out in the bush.
 
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uncompromise

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  • Coffee pre-ground from fresh beans (i used to fresh grind at camp, but I’m usually up well before my wife, and prefer to minimise unnecessary effort and noise)
  • Two Aeropress, to make a day‘s worth of caffeine for two people
  • Make two full thermos of coffee in the morning, and depending on whether we’re hiking, or sitting around, we either have a Café cap for a thermos, or a lid for the cup.
 
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old_man

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I do it the old school way. I have a enameled coffee percolator pot that goes on the stove. I throw a couple of eggs in to cook while the coffee perks. My only fancy thing is using Boyer's Hazelnut coffee, Nice and strong.
 
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I use an Aeropress at home. When going on the road I will make up one cup of concentrate for each day that I'll be gone, (I usually only drink one cup in the morning). Then, each time I want a cup, I'll pour out two ounces the concentrate for each cup of coffee and then dilute it, just as at home. It's about as fast as instant, but much tastier.
 
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