Rig Lighting

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MidOH

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Mine for the Ford were great. I'll check out the Hella's. Thanks.
 

Lanlubber

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Mimbres, NM, USA
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covey sr
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Just be certain to spend some time staring into your jeep headlights at night to make sure they aren't too bright. Low beams are dim for a reason.

Another jeeper caused a head on collision with aftermarket headlights in the rain (again). Be careful. Even the oem led's are a bit much.
Only an idiot would use off road lights on the highway. We have a bunch of them here in NM but they are not off roaders, they are just idiots period.
 

MidOH

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Same guys that leave thier OEM fog lights on, on the hwy. Or the Dodge guys with mirrors flipped all the way out, when they have no tow hitch at all.

Aftermarket jeep headlights, meant to drop into the DOT spots. They don't work so hot. But yeah, the lightbar newbs are a problem to.

Very very bright lights in the OEM spot. It's getting bad around here.
 
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kojack

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Grand Falls-Windsor, NL, Canada
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Only an idiot would use off road lights on the highway. We have a bunch of them here in NM but they are not off roaders, they are just idiots period.
I use off road lights (hella HID converted 500s and 450s) on the highway here, but it's not like a hugely populated area. In the night you will pass by probably 10 vehciles per hour. I have them hooked up to my high beams and a switch when I want to operate my high beams independantly. Here, it's a matter of life and death on the highways. We have a greater population of moose per land area than anywhere else in north america. So aux. lighting is a must for driving in the night. Not an option. Most people are good about it but there are some that just keep the LED bars on all the time. idiots!
 

Lanlubber

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Off-Road Ranger I

2,357
Mimbres, NM, USA
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Jim
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covey sr
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none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
I use off road lights (hella HID converted 500s and 450s) on the highway here, but it's not like a hugely populated area. In the night you will pass by probably 10 vehciles per hour. I have them hooked up to my high beams and a switch when I want to operate my high beams independantly. Here, it's a matter of life and death on the highways. We have a greater population of moose per land area than anywhere else in north america. So aux. lighting is a must for driving in the night. Not an option. Most people are good about it but there are some that just keep the LED bars on all the time. idiots!
I think you are right to do it under those conditions, I live in a mountain area with winding up and down roads and plenty of deer
Pigs, cows, and elk crossing my roads too. Common courtesy tells you to dim your lights for on coming traffic AS SOON as you see it coming.

That's my problem with drivers in my area. They don't dim until you are Already blinded, if they dim at all. I'm old, had cataract surgery, bulging cornea surgery, and badly affected by light glare anyway. I don't have extra lighting and I don't have a raised vehicle that places the lights higher than they are supposed to be. If I can drive on my roads without the extra lights anyone else should be able too. Staying alert and slowing down will keep you out of trouble in most cases. I don't know how many times I have had near misses in 23 years on my roads. Most of those incidents in broad daylight and it just happened so fast I barely had time to react. In all cases it was my constant alertness that avoided a road kill, ME..

I wouldn't ask others to do as I do, but I would ask that they use their extra lighting as you stated and as you do. Also when someone approaches from behind, they should dim their lights so as to not blind you in the mirror. If big rig driver's can do it, and most do, others should follow their example. Courtesy goes a long way.
 

Lanlubber

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Mimbres, NM, USA
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covey sr
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My ditch lights in action was using them so other 4x4s on the beach could see me in the fog. Having a silver truck does not help.
View attachment 129556View attachment 129557

You look like a Ghost, do the lights help that much for your visual ? I want some for off road driving and camp lightings. Hardly ever see fog in my area so I don't need them for that.
 

Boostpowered

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You look like a Ghost, do the lights help that much for your visual ? I want some for off road driving and camp lightings. Hardly ever see fog in my area so I don't need them for that.
The ditch lights didnt really do anything to help me see in that situation normally you want fog lights low but there was enough light to see through the fog . I just had em on so any on coming traffic would see me coming. Ditch lights in normal fog do not work and will blind ya, but when on a tight trail after dark in normal conditions they are awesome, Especially paired with led headlights. Of the 4 ditch lights i have 2 are spots and 2 are floods and i can move them in different directions depending on what i need them for.
 
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kojack

Rank IV

Enthusiast III

1,212
Grand Falls-Windsor, NL, Canada
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Steve
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Adams
I think you are right to do it under those conditions, I live in a mountain area with winding up and down roads and plenty of deer
Pigs, cows, and elk crossing my roads too. Common courtesy tells you to dim your lights for on coming traffic AS SOON as you see it coming.

That's my problem with drivers in my area. They don't dim until you are Already blinded, if they dim at all. I'm old, had cataract surgery, bulging cornea surgery, and badly affected by light glare anyway. I don't have extra lighting and I don't have a raised vehicle that places the lights higher than they are supposed to be. If I can drive on my roads without the extra lights anyone else should be able too. Staying alert and slowing down will keep you out of trouble in most cases. I don't know how many times I have had near misses in 23 years on my roads. Most of those incidents in broad daylight and it just happened so fast I barely had time to react. In all cases it was my constant alertness that avoided a road kill, ME..

I wouldn't ask others to do as I do, but I would ask that they use their extra lighting as you stated and as you do. Also when someone approaches from behind, they should dim their lights so as to not blind you in the mirror. If big rig driver's can do it, and most do, others should follow their example. Courtesy goes a long way.
for the most part that is what happens here. People know that moose are a killer on our roads, so everyone runs aux lighting and most everyone has them wired to their high beam trigger. It’s really a way of life here. I have been passed when I am doing 80-90 kph in the night like I was stopped , while I was looking at three moose coming towards the highway. People just don’t get it.
 

Lanlubber

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Mimbres, NM, USA
First Name
Jim
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covey sr
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16986

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none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
for the most part that is what happens here. People know that moose are a killer on our roads, so everyone runs aux lighting and most everyone has them wired to their high beam trigger. It’s really a way of life here. I have been passed when I am doing 80-90 kph in the night like I was stopped , while I was looking at three moose coming towards the highway. People just don’t get it.
Oh Steve I didn't realize you are in Canada.
You do have a lot of Moose there and not a lot of traffic. Yeah, Moose are monstrous in size.
I think you need to add some more lights and slow down to 30 mph ! :-)
 

Lanlubber

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Mimbres, NM, USA
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covey sr
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Here are the front lights on our rig. They are 24v Truck-lite. 12 flood, 2 fog, and 2 spotlight.

Dan
M1088 Stewart and Stevenson
#rollingossuaryView attachment 129677
I would hope you wouldn't use all your ammo in traffic would you. For the boonies that looks sufficient though, maybe a little overkill, huh ?
Very nice rig !
 
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kojack

Rank IV

Enthusiast III

1,212
Grand Falls-Windsor, NL, Canada
First Name
Steve
Last Name
Adams
I think you are right to do it under those conditions, I live in a mountain area with winding up and down roads and plenty of deer
Pigs, cows, and elk crossing my roads too. Common courtesy tells you to dim your lights for on coming traffic AS SOON as you see it coming.

That's my problem with drivers in my area. They don't dim until you are Already blinded, if they dim at all. I'm old, had cataract surgery, bulging cornea surgery, and badly affected by light glare anyway. I don't have extra lighting and I don't have a raised vehicle that places the lights higher than they are supposed to be. If I can drive on my roads without the extra lights anyone else should be able too. Staying alert and slowing down will keep you out of trouble in most cases. I don't know how many times I have had near misses in 23 years on my roads. Most of those incidents in broad daylight and it just happened so fast I barely had time to react. In all cases it was my constant alertness that avoided a road kill, ME..

I wouldn't ask others to do as I do, but I would ask that they use their extra lighting as you stated and as you do. Also when someone approaches from behind, they should dim their lights so as to not blind you in the mirror. If big rig driver's can do it, and most do, others should follow their example. Courtesy goes a long way.
yes, when I am driving at night I am very aware of others coming towards me. That being said, I have hit one moose because of poor lighting. I have not run a rig since without aux lighting. Even with lights I slow down. Just common sense around here
 

64Trvlr

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Only an idiot would use off road lights on the highway. We have a bunch of them here in NM but they are not off roaders, they are just idiots period.

One idiot checking in!

Where I live early mornings or late evenings there is little to no traffic with the exception of elk, deer, cattle, horses and sometime vehicles people left not quite off the road. I use my off road lights a lot during those hours so I can see and avoid those things.

When I see headlights coming my way I dim my lights until they have passed. I've had mornings that in 40 minutes or so I've only seen 3-4 other vehicles.

Now I have had a lot of people with "improved" factory lights and light bars blind me from over a mile because they didn't bother to aim those really cool lights. If you're going to put lights on your rig take an hour or so and aim them so that they actually work.
 
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