Puncture Repair Kits

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TreXTerra

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Advocate II

2,779
Salt Lake City, Utah
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What is everyone using for puncture repair kits? I have a cheap no-name kit that I'd like to upgrade to a better one that has stronger tools. ARB makes one that I know some people use, but I'm curious if there are better or better-for-the-money (and space) kits out there. ARB tends to bank off the brand, despite many of their products being made in China in the same factory as the no-name product (their tire deflator comes to mind).

This one from Boulder Tools looks more complete and is a few dollars cheaper.
This is another one.

So what is everyone using, and do you recommend it?
 

TerryD

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Off-Road Ranger I

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R
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I just ordered two of the cheaper kits that only have the handles, plugs and lube. I figure I already carry the pliers. I think the kit was $17?

The plastic case will go away too. I keep my kit in a zipper pouch so it takes up less space in the tool box.
 
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Corbet

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Durango, CO
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Safety Seal is the tried and true kit IMHO. Personally I’ve got the kit from Powertank only because it was on sale and made it a little less than the Safety Seal at the time. It has always worked great.

Comes in a tool roll now. Mine is 10 years old so it’s in the typical blown plastic case.
https://powertank.com/products/kit-8134
 
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Jkk

Rank IV

Pathfinder I

1,008
Georgia
I’ve plugged at least 957 tires with your basic plugs and driver. Had to plug a guys tire on the GA traverse in the middle of Johns Mountain wma. Used one of the cheap plugs and it lasted for months after the trip. All ya need
 
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Enthusiast II

1,250
Hartford, SD
I can't say much about the other brands since I have no personal experience with them. I have plenty with the safety seal brand. Stick with a kit that comes with metal handled tools. the plastic will break. Back when I worked in the shop we had a kit in each tow truck. All safety seal we never broke one in the 15 years I was there. I've sold shops several of the metal handled replacement tools when their cheaper (plastic handles) kits fail.
 

Oakster

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Oakland, CA USA
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I'll second the suggestion of Safety Seal, though I'm sure many brands work. What I like with Safety Seal is the tremendous quality of the tools - I see the plastic-handled tools from China at all the auto parts stores and I imagine them failing miles from asphalt, and possibly poking through your hand.

I recently returned to at least the possibility of overlanding after a few years of driving a 2WD truck. I started inventorying my recovery gear and realized that my Safety Seal kit is 21 years old, and added buying new plugs to my "to do" list...A few days later I got on the road at 6am on a Sunday morning to meet some buddies for coffee and heard a "thump thump" coming from my front driver side tire, and found this nasty piece of vehicle trim and screw.
62896055905__2550DA09-7FF2-4CEF-B282-96F73AF3DA54.jpg

I went online and read that Safety Seal lists the shelf life of their tire plugs as 6 years - and as mentioned my kit was 21 years old. I went to the auto parts store and found some fresh tire plugs but couldn't get the repair to work (based on user error...) In frustration I pulled out a 21 year old Safety Seal plug and it worked perfectly - 2 months later later the repair is holding, tire hasn't lost any air and I can't locate the repair on the tire.

Here's the kit that's been sitting forlornly in the shop since I sold my Trooper years ago...I've replaced the old plugs, though they may well have still worked 10 years from now.
IMG_1396.jpg
 

Pretzel

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OB1

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Greenville, NC
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I assisted a guy who had nearly bald street tires at full inflation cut a 1.5" gash right in the middle of his tire driving over trails in Uwharrie. He plugged that entire cut with every sticky plug in his kit. Damn if it didn't get him out. I have no idea if he tried to drive home on it, but it held pressure at least to get to the parking lot. (My assistance was to provide the inflation with my smittybilt compressor.)

After that, I'll never underestimate the proper application of those sticky plugs.
 

Boostpowered

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Educator II

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Hunt county, TX, USA
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Davis
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I carry a full size spare in the bed all the time and a second original spare if where I'm going is especially rocky or has stumps. And carry whatever brand tire plug kit you get at Walmart or auto parts stores I think its the green slime brand with my compressor under the rear seat.

When I was poor and younger I had a lot of tires with patches in them And drove on em til the rest of the tire was wore out.
 

Trail_pilot

Rank III

Enthusiast III

830
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James
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Girard
el cheapo plug kits for me. Put 3 plugs in my wife's tires this year ( I really don't know where the hell she's been driving) and many before that. no issues with the cheap ones. when I cut off the extra I always burn the end and flatten it and it seems to hold like new.
 

El-Dracho

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Supporter

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I carry one of these standard sets and have added a colby emergency valve and standard valve and some tire mounting grease to it. That works for me. On longer trips and for rally service I carry two tire levers in addition and sometimes also a tube just in case. When buying a tire repair set I recommend to keep especially an eye on the quality of the awls. The awl has to be very forceful, so it should be stable, especially the handle. I would always choose something properly made of metal here.

By the way, I find these valve extractors, which are integrated in the valve cap, very practical.
 
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Lindenwood

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Advocate II

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New Mexico
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McDonald
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I bought an ARB kit from a local store after bending my cheap $7 kit trying to push the plug in. The ARB kit was $40 locally, but I have used it 3 times so it has paid for itself in time.