Portable fire pits | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Portable fire pits

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uncompromise

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Thanks for all of the great feedback. Yes, buying a portable fire pit seems counter-intuitive, especially when there are ways that you can do this, on the cheap, with found materials. For us, portability and packability are key — our background is in long distance trekking, so we’re retaining our values of carrying no unnecessary weight over to our vehicle. Having ripped over 150kg out of the back already, we have no desire to lose the fuel efficiency gains by hauling anything we don’t need. We live in France, and one of the key advantages of a fire pit is that we can travel anywhere in Europe, have a fire, and not break regulations unless there is a total fire ban in place. Also, leaving no trace matters.

The Primus Kamoto and the Fireside Outdoor are strong contenders for us - they have the right combination of weight and size, and the PrImus immediately rises to the top because it’s affordable and accessible here. Shipping from the US is a PITA, and customs duties and VAT make any cost savings redundant.

Separately, the one unit we keep coming back to, even though it’s nowhere near as packable, is the Petromax Atago (which the Volcano looks like it’s modeled on). It’s nowhere near as compact, but for something that we can use just as comfortably in our garden, it ticks a lot of boxes. It’s very popular with European overlanders from what I see, and it’s hard to go wrong with German engineering ...

1617869485388.png
 

bgenlvtex

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Thanks for all of the great feedback. Yes, buying a portable fire pit seems counter-intuitive, especially when there are ways that you can do this, on the cheap, with found materials. For us, portability and packability are key — our background is in long distance trekking, so we’re retaining our values of carrying no unnecessary weight over to our vehicle. Having ripped over 150kg out of the back already, we have no desire to lose the fuel efficiency gains by hauling anything we don’t need. We live in France, and one of the key advantages of a fire pit is that we can travel anywhere in Europe, have a fire, and not break regulations unless there is a total fire ban in place. Also, leaving no trace matters.

The Primus Kamoto and the Fireside Outdoor are strong contenders for us - they have the right combination of weight and size, and the PrImus immediately rises to the top because it’s affordable and accessible here. Shipping from the US is a PITA, and customs duties and VAT make any cost savings redundant.

Separately, the one unit we keep coming back to, even though it’s nowhere near as packable, is the Petromax Atago (which the Volcano looks like it’s modeled on). It’s nowhere near as compact, but for something that we can use just as comfortably in our garden, it ticks a lot of boxes. It’s very popular with European overlanders from what I see, and it’s hard to go wrong with German engineering ...

View attachment 194015
I really like the Primus and Fireside form factor and the weight of the Fireside(although it is so light it gives me some concern) but I agree with you on the Petromax. I think the Petromax would be safer in unexpectedly windy conditions, and if actually using it for heat I think the Petromax would do a better job with a smaller amount of fuel. Used in conjunction with a reflective screen I bet the Petromax would produce some good directional heat. The Petromax however is stunningly expensive so there is that.
 

AntWookie

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I have the UCO large Flat Pack portable fire pit, I love it! I can carry in my backpack on hikes, or keep it easily stored in my Outback for adventures. It works great for 1-2 people and can handle larger pans/pots, the only downside is having to lift the grill to load wood/fuel. I definitely recommend this fire pit to people looking for an inexpensive and super storable unit.
 

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Road

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I have the UCO large Flat Pack portable fire pit, I love it! I can carry in my backpack on hikes, or keep it easily stored in my Outback for adventures. It works great for 1-2 people and can handle larger pans/pots, the only downside is having to lift the grill to load wood/fuel. I definitely recommend this fire pit to people looking for an inexpensive and super storable unit.
.
Aren't they handy? Lightweight and very portable for hikes, bike-packing, canoe trips and around town picnics.

Mine is 10x13.5 surface when open and says Medium on the UCO grill page. Is yours larger? I see they have a Mini, too, with a 9x6.75 surface.
.
 
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AntWookie

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I have the UCO large Flat Pack portable fire pit, I love it! I can carry in my backpack on hikes, or keep it easily stored in my Outback for adventures. It works great for 1-2 people and can handle larger pans/pots, the only downside is having to lift the grill to load wood/fuel. I definitely recommend this fire pit to people looking for an inexpensive and super storable unit.
.
Aren't they handy? Lightweight and very portable for hikes, bike-packing, canoe trips and around town picnics.

Mine is 10x13.5 surface when open and says Medium on the UCO grill page. Is yours larger? I see they have a Mini, too, with a 9x6.75 surface.
.
Yeah I have the 10”x13” grill they only have 2 sizes the regular larger 10x13 one, and a mini 6x9 one.
I’m thinking of adding a strip of expanded steel mesh I can sit in the bottom for extra airflow, and it will fold up with it for storage.
 
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Road

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Yeah I have the 10”x13” grill they only have 2 sizes the regular larger 10x13 one, and a mini 6x9 one.
I’m thinking of adding a strip of expanded steel mesh I can sit in the bottom for extra airflow, and it will fold up with it for storage.
.
Cool, yep; I've seen a few firepits that have that, both for charcoal briquets and increased airflow with wood fires. Post up here with what you did, if you do it. Careful the steel mesh is not galvanized or coated with anything that will taint the meat. Don't know if zinc coated is okay or not.
.
 
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genocache

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.
Aren't they handy? Lightweight and very portable for hikes, bike-packing, canoe trips and around town picnics.

Mine is 10x13.5 surface when open and says Medium on the UCO grill page. Is yours larger? I see they have a Mini, too, with a 9x6.75 surface.
.

Road, that UCO link lead me down a rabbithole, You might enjoy this twig cooker I made from watching a Jack Absalom Outback show. Again on my blog;

cooker.JPG
 
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Road

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Road, that UCO link lead me down a rabbithole, You might enjoy this twig cooker I made from watching a Jack Absalom Outback show. Again on my blog;

View attachment 194370
.
Ahh, very cool! Thanks for the link.

I haven't made any myself, though have several twig stoves I've experimented with for taking with while canoeing and biking, like the cool Bushbuddy from Alaska, the Outon (can burn wood as well as alcohol) and the KampMate, though the best has been two versions I have from Simple Theory Gear, as he tweaked his design when he first got going.

Got them just before the pandemic hit so haven't had time or place to really play with them in the wild. He's constantly tested and evolved his stoves to be useful and practical, while fitting the most popular bushcraft style cooking gear like Stanley products. I see he's incorporating his brand mark into his stove now. Very efficient and practical little cooker.

Though small twig stoves sort of apply to this thread, I don't want to derail or bogart it with non-firepit gear if the OP did not intend it.

You should start a thread in Kitchen, Cooking, & Recipes or Overland Do It Yourself Projects - I think a number of folks here would be interested, myself included.
.
 
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Ragman

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If anyone is interested I just received my new Snow Peak Takibi Solo fire pit. I have not burned it yet but did do a quick unboxing video on YouTube that shows the set up and gives you an idea of the size. It you are interested it is here-

 

genocache

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.
Ahh, very cool! Thanks for the link.

I haven't made any myself, though have several twig stoves I've experimented with for taking with while canoeing and biking, like the cool Bushbuddy from Alaska, the Outon (can burn wood as well as alcohol) and the KampMate, though the best has been two versions I have from Simple Theory Gear, as he tweaked his design when he first got going.

Got them just before the pandemic hit so haven't had time or place to really play with them in the wild. He's constantly tested and evolved his stoves to be useful and practical, while fitting the most popular bushcraft style cooking gear like Stanley products. I see he's incorporating his brand mark into his stove now. Very efficient and practical little cooker.

Though small twig stoves sort of apply to this thread, I don't want to derail or bogart it with non-firepit gear if the OP did not intend it.

You should start a thread in Kitchen, Cooking, & Recipes or Overland Do It Yourself Projects - I think a number of folks here would be interested, myself included.
.

Road, I guess I didn't see this when you posted it. Those Simple Theory stoves look nice, they remind me of the coffee can stoves we made in the Cub or Boy Scouts and used a tuna can filled with cardboard and wax for fire. I'll look into doing a thread on the cooker I made.
 
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Ragman

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Ahh, very cool! Thanks for the link.

I haven't made any myself, though have several twig stoves I've experimented with for taking with while canoeing and biking, like the cool Bushbuddy from Alaska, the Outon (can burn wood as well as alcohol) and the KampMate, though the best has been two versions I have from Simple Theory Gear, as he tweaked his design when he first got going.

Got them just before the pandemic hit so haven't had time or place to really play with them in the wild. He's constantly tested and evolved his stoves to be useful and practical, while fitting the most popular bushcraft style cooking gear like Stanley products. I see he's incorporating his brand mark into his stove now. Very efficient and practical little cooker.

Though small twig stoves sort of apply to this thread, I don't want to derail or bogart it with non-firepit gear if the OP did not intend it.

You should start a thread in Kitchen, Cooking, & Recipes or Overland Do It Yourself Projects - I think a number of folks here would be interested, myself included.
.
@Road have you tried the Firebox G2 (or smaller one)? I think these are really nice stoves, although make sure you get the version made in USA, I do think it is better made than the Chinese one offered in the kits.
 
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Road

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@Road have you tried the Firebox G2 (or smaller one)? I think these are really nice stoves, although make sure you get the version made in USA, I do think it is better made than the Chinese one offered in the kits.
.

I just checked it out, and looks interesting. Though similar in function to the Outon (also hinged) and KampMate and one or two others I have (I have too many, in wanting to test and compare!) it looks like the inner grate and various placement options and larger top 'grill' add to its features.

I like their Firebox Nano stove, too; especially that it is so compact and fits nicely into its own case.

Thanks for the tip!
.
 

MOAK

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I have a Volcano Stove/Grill that I have been very happy with. It's not super small but it does a very good job at cooking and putting out heat.


I’ll second this motion. Charcoal, wood or propane. We use charcoal and wood. Put the cover on and it’s a perfect grill. After searching long and hard for a grill that’s easy to pack away we bought ours 7 or 8 years ago. It should last another 7 or 8 years with ease. The only thing wrong with it is the flimsy carry bag, which is easily rectified by using a robust canvas tote bag.
 

Ragman

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I was able to put the new Snow Peak Takibi Solo to use last night and put it up on the YouTube channel if anyone wants to check it out-

 

Ragman

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.

I just checked it out, and looks interesting. Though similar in function to the Outon (also hinged) and KampMate and one or two others I have (I have too many, in wanting to test and compare!) it looks like the inner grate and various placement options and larger top 'grill' add to its features.

I like their Firebox Nano stove, too; especially that it is so compact and fits nicely into its own case.

Thanks for the tip!
.
I was just on the Firebox website today and theNano is on sale if you were interested.
 
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PCO6

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Another nod here for the UCO Flat Pack. I've used it on the last 2 trips and now won't go any where without it. Not only does it work great it takes up NO SPACE! I found the storage bag to be a little tight so I replaced it with a slightly larger leather(like) case I used to carry for work (files, papers, etc.). The case it came with is well made and is great for maps and general camp paper work. I'm now cutting my backyard hardwood tree scraps to suit the size of my UCO grill.
 
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Team4M

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Another nod here for the UCO Flat Pack. I've used it on the last 2 trips and now won't go any where without it. Not only does it work great it takes up NO SPACE! I found the storage bag to be a little tight so I replaced it with a slightly larger leather(like) case I used to carry for work (files, papers, etc.). The case it came with is well made and is great for maps and general camp paper work. I'm now cutting my backyard hardwood tree scraps to suit the size of my UCO grill.
I picked up a UCO flatpack (based on this thread!) and love it. Super simple and packable, very happy. I used it as a grill and fire pit both on my last trip.
 

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