Photography

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JButtress

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Charlotte
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Jason
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Buttress
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View attachment 100811
While you’re agonising about what new gear you need to buy, have a thought about just going out there with what you have and being creative. I took this with my iPhone 5
Yea I’m not overly worried about spending too much more money. I have the iPhone X Max, and it takes incredible photos. Thinking of just getting one more solid lense for the Canon at some point
 
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pnwcruiser

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Seattle, WA, USA
First Name
Michael
Last Name
Swartz
I have a Canon T5. Definitely interested in learning more, and expanding the different lenses I have, etc
The T5 is a good DSLR. Some basics to keep in mind are if you use the full auto mode, you are at not going to get the look you want all the time. It'll adjust everything for a 'good' exposure. That Av and Tv mode are going to change your life as you want to learn more. Depending on what you want to shoot, Av can help refine that bokeh (focussed in one area and blurred in another). Av is Aperture Priority, essentially you lock in how wide open the lens is when taking in light. The lower the number for aperture, the wider open it is letting more light in and minimizing the full area in focus (more bokeh effect). The higher the aperture number, the less light it's letting in and providing more area that's in focus (less bokeh effect).

If you are looking to shoot portraits, the nifty-fifty 50mm 1.8 is a fantastic and super cheap lens ($125) , the 1.8 85mm ($350) is even more awesome for portraits and both works great on the camera you have. These are called prime lenses, they do not zoom in and out.

For landscape, it really depends on what you want to shoot. Landscape pros carry an arrangement of lenses. Wide angle and telephoto are popular for landscape shots. Since you have an APS-C (crop sensor) camera, I'd recommend a wide angle zoom that's designed for crop sensor cameras. Reason being is you could go drop a lot on a lens designed for a full-frame camera, it'll work well...but you'll never get to take advantage of why it's so expensive either. There are some superb wide angle zoom lenses made by Canon, Tamron and Sigma designed to work with APS-C sensors that cost far less than a pro grade weather sealed lens. The glass and elements are what really drive up the prices, you get what you pay for but you can also shoot award winning photos with consumer grade equipment as long as you care for it properly. Keep it dry, keep dust and dirt out of it, use proper lens wipes after using a air blower to help get rid of dirt/sand, keep your lenses on the camera and try your best to not expose the sensor to the elements of the big bad world. I've seen people walking with pro grade equipment and have finger prints on their lens glass...it's totally makes it pointless if you can't get a clean shot because there's greasy finger prints in the way.

I can go on and on and on. Some resources I love are:
CreativeLive.com and specifically John Greengo's classes https://www.creativelive.com/instructor/john-greengo his courses on learning your camera are hands down the best out there. He also has fantastic courses for a variety of photography learning. He lives in Seattle and shoots photos with his friend, the amazing Art Wolfe https://www.creativelive.com/instructor/art-wolfe who is going to blow your mind with his wildlife and landscape photography.

YouTube, tons of free stuff on YouTube that's pretty darn good.

B&H, a great resource for gear and learning Photography Videos
Adorama, another great resource for gear and learning https://www.adorama.com/alc/category/AdoramaTv/

FStoppers has some good stuff

PetaPixel https://petapixel.com/topic/tutorials/ is great

There's tons of great ways to learn more. I love photography, shoot for fun but know a decent amount to make a decent shot. I love learning more and find talking with others about stuff teaches me something new all the time. Feel free to ask me and if I have some ideas that can help, I'm happy to do so. Here's a shot I took at Bryce Canyon using my cranky old 5D MKii and Tamron 15-30mm (love this lens, it's just heavy and big).

At the end of the day, as Chase Jarvis (founder of CreativeLive) says, "the best camera is the one that's with you". So if all you have is your cell phone, learn it's features and settings, you'll be amazed.
 

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Gabriel Bozeman

NorthWest Region Member Representative
Member

Traveler I

4,435
Oak Harbor, WA, USA
First Name
Gabriel
Last Name
Bozeman
Member #

16957

The T5 is a good DSLR. Some basics to keep in mind are if you use the full auto mode, you are at not going to get the look you want all the time. It'll adjust everything for a 'good' exposure. That Av and Tv mode are going to change your life as you want to learn more. Depending on what you want to shoot, Av can help refine that bokeh (focussed in one area and blurred in another). Av is Aperture Priority, essentially you lock in how wide open the lens is when taking in light. The lower the number for aperture, the wider open it is letting more light in and minimizing the full area in focus (more bokeh effect). The higher the aperture number, the less light it's letting in and providing more area that's in focus (less bokeh effect).

If you are looking to shoot portraits, the nifty-fifty 50mm 1.8 is a fantastic and super cheap lens ($125) , the 1.8 85mm ($350) is even more awesome for portraits and both works great on the camera you have. These are called prime lenses, they do not zoom in and out.

For landscape, it really depends on what you want to shoot. Landscape pros carry an arrangement of lenses. Wide angle and telephoto are popular for landscape shots. Since you have an APS-C (crop sensor) camera, I'd recommend a wide angle zoom that's designed for crop sensor cameras. Reason being is you could go drop a lot on a lens designed for a full-frame camera, it'll work well...but you'll never get to take advantage of why it's so expensive either. There are some superb wide angle zoom lenses made by Canon, Tamron and Sigma designed to work with APS-C sensors that cost far less than a pro grade weather sealed lens. The glass and elements are what really drive up the prices, you get what you pay for but you can also shoot award winning photos with consumer grade equipment as long as you care for it properly. Keep it dry, keep dust and dirt out of it, use proper lens wipes after using a air blower to help get rid of dirt/sand, keep your lenses on the camera and try your best to not expose the sensor to the elements of the big bad world. I've seen people walking with pro grade equipment and have finger prints on their lens glass...it's totally makes it pointless if you can't get a clean shot because there's greasy finger prints in the way.

I can go on and on and on. Some resources I love are:
CreativeLive.com and specifically John Greengo's classes https://www.creativelive.com/instructor/john-greengo his courses on learning your camera are hands down the best out there. He also has fantastic courses for a variety of photography learning. He lives in Seattle and shoots photos with his friend, the amazing Art Wolfe https://www.creativelive.com/instructor/art-wolfe who is going to blow your mind with his wildlife and landscape photography.

YouTube, tons of free stuff on YouTube that's pretty darn good.

B&H, a great resource for gear and learning Photography Videos
Adorama, another great resource for gear and learning https://www.adorama.com/alc/category/AdoramaTv/

FStoppers has some good stuff

PetaPixel https://petapixel.com/topic/tutorials/ is great

There's tons of great ways to learn more. I love photography, shoot for fun but know a decent amount to make a decent shot. I love learning more and find talking with others about stuff teaches me something new all the time. Feel free to ask me and if I have some ideas that can help, I'm happy to do so. Here's a shot I took at Bryce Canyon using my cranky old 5D MKii and Tamron 15-30mm (love this lens, it's just heavy and big).

At the end of the day, as Chase Jarvis (founder of CreativeLive) says, "the best camera is the one that's with you". So if all you have is your cell phone, learn it's features and settings, you'll be amazed.
Did you take that photo? That's amazing!
 
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JButtress

Rank V
Member
Supporter +

Member II

1,872
Charlotte
First Name
Jason
Last Name
Buttress
Member #

13002

The T5 is a good DSLR. Some basics to keep in mind are if you use the full auto mode, you are at not going to get the look you want all the time. It'll adjust everything for a 'good' exposure. That Av and Tv mode are going to change your life as you want to learn more. Depending on what you want to shoot, Av can help refine that bokeh (focussed in one area and blurred in another). Av is Aperture Priority, essentially you lock in how wide open the lens is when taking in light. The lower the number for aperture, the wider open it is letting more light in and minimizing the full area in focus (more bokeh effect). The higher the aperture number, the less light it's letting in and providing more area that's in focus (less bokeh effect).

If you are looking to shoot portraits, the nifty-fifty 50mm 1.8 is a fantastic and super cheap lens ($125) , the 1.8 85mm ($350) is even more awesome for portraits and both works great on the camera you have. These are called prime lenses, they do not zoom in and out.

For landscape, it really depends on what you want to shoot. Landscape pros carry an arrangement of lenses. Wide angle and telephoto are popular for landscape shots. Since you have an APS-C (crop sensor) camera, I'd recommend a wide angle zoom that's designed for crop sensor cameras. Reason being is you could go drop a lot on a lens designed for a full-frame camera, it'll work well...but you'll never get to take advantage of why it's so expensive either. There are some superb wide angle zoom lenses made by Canon, Tamron and Sigma designed to work with APS-C sensors that cost far less than a pro grade weather sealed lens. The glass and elements are what really drive up the prices, you get what you pay for but you can also shoot award winning photos with consumer grade equipment as long as you care for it properly. Keep it dry, keep dust and dirt out of it, use proper lens wipes after using a air blower to help get rid of dirt/sand, keep your lenses on the camera and try your best to not expose the sensor to the elements of the big bad world. I've seen people walking with pro grade equipment and have finger prints on their lens glass...it's totally makes it pointless if you can't get a clean shot because there's greasy finger prints in the way.

I can go on and on and on. Some resources I love are:
CreativeLive.com and specifically John Greengo's classes https://www.creativelive.com/instructor/john-greengo his courses on learning your camera are hands down the best out there. He also has fantastic courses for a variety of photography learning. He lives in Seattle and shoots photos with his friend, the amazing Art Wolfe https://www.creativelive.com/instructor/art-wolfe who is going to blow your mind with his wildlife and landscape photography.

YouTube, tons of free stuff on YouTube that's pretty darn good.

B&H, a great resource for gear and learning Photography Videos
Adorama, another great resource for gear and learning https://www.adorama.com/alc/category/AdoramaTv/

FStoppers has some good stuff

PetaPixel https://petapixel.com/topic/tutorials/ is great

There's tons of great ways to learn more. I love photography, shoot for fun but know a decent amount to make a decent shot. I love learning more and find talking with others about stuff teaches me something new all the time. Feel free to ask me and if I have some ideas that can help, I'm happy to do so. Here's a shot I took at Bryce Canyon using my cranky old 5D MKii and Tamron 15-30mm (love this lens, it's just heavy and big).

At the end of the day, as Chase Jarvis (founder of CreativeLive) says, "the best camera is the one that's with you". So if all you have is your cell phone, learn it's features and settings, you'll be amazed.
Thanks for the reply. This is some great info!
 
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Gabriel Bozeman

NorthWest Region Member Representative
Member

Traveler I

4,435
Oak Harbor, WA, USA
First Name
Gabriel
Last Name
Bozeman
Member #

16957

Thank you! I did. We took a family trip to Zion and Bryce Canyon a little over a year ago and I snapped that shot and a ton of others. Great place to visit with the family.
Dang. Great shot! I made it to Zion last year, but didn't get to Bryce or any of the northern parks. Can't wait to go back.
 
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