Overlanding with Animals (Pets or Other..?)

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Kevigizmo

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As we all know, Overlanding and Off-roading are pretty much two separate beasts of their own,

but talking about beasts, it's becoming more and more popular to be travelling with your beloved pets (Dogs mostly but there have been cases of people taking more.. exotic ones along for the ride)

Things to consider when travelling with pets is very similar to the human aspect
- comfort
- climate
- food
The list does go on as you would expect with a person,

Other things to bear in mind is whether your pet has the correct documentation to travel, here in UK its known as a Pet Passport - this has details of any and all vaccinations the animal has received,
Some countries don't allow certain pets (Being a previous Ferret owner, I know that in certain parts of USA they are illegal)
But remember its not just if you are going to be visiting the country if they are allowed, it's more about travelling through the country,
If you don't have the correct documents, you could face a fine, a trip back or worse - leaving your pet behind in quarantine!

So things to remember!
1 - Treat them as you would a person in terms of needs (food, water, comfort breaks)
2 - ensure you have the correct documentation (Pet passport, Vaccination certificates)
3 - Make considerations when planning your trip whether there are extra rules in the host country that you are travelling to/through

most of all - ENJOY!
 

MOAK

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I love dogs. Our last dog, Maggie, a beautiful Australian Shepard, passed away 4 years ago. I still miss her. In spite of my love of dogs, ( and cats ), we will not be getting another dog until our overlanding days are behind us, in other words, probably not ever. There are too many places that dogs are not allowed, and for very good reasons that I completely understand and agree with. Namely, National Parks. In fact, I called out a dog owner for having their dog with them on the WRT, and then having the audacity to video the event and post it up on youtube. I was very polite wih my words, but nonetheless was labeled by the owners, and many viewers as being a " hater ", So far from the truth.

Our trip for 2018 is in the planning stages and the last thing we need is to be dragging a dog with us onto the Baja Peninsula, let alone across the border.
 

Kumayama

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[QUOTE="

Our trip for 2018 is in the planning stages and the last thing we need is to be dragging a dog with us onto the Baja Peninsula, let alone dogbooties.com.


I certainly understand and respect your sensibilities, but I'd just like others to be aware that one can quite legally, successfully and enjoyably take your dog into Mexico, and Baja in particular. We've taken a large male Akita with us on multiple back country trips about Baja, including a multi-day mountaineering ascent of Picacho del Diablo (remote, highest point in Baja). Just check out the latest vaccinations and veterinary certificate that are required, show the papers at time entry, and have them handy if they are asked for later (though we have never been asked to do this). One of my more amusing remembrances is gassing up near El Rosario and having the attendant unexpectedly discern the quite large head of a 130lb Akita emerge from the passenger window right next to where he was standing followed by the excited exclamation of "boca grande!!!"


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adventure_is_necessary

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Anywhere I go, my dog goes. That's just how it's always been. I can't stand to leave him and he's a good co-pilot. Although, he's no good with navigation or taking over driving. I have him trained rather well so I never have to worry about him wandering off. He keeps me company and ensures that we're taking breaks as needed. He takes up less space overall with himself and his gear than a human passenger would.
 

4wheelspulling

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Many places will not even let you have a dog in the parking lot if over 75 f. In outside temps. While that sounds good at first, it makes it hard on the responseable pet owners even going in for a few minutes, of shopping, or people traveling through the area. The points the OP stated from the first post I completely agree with. Pets do need special requirements and consideration when traveling with them. I think about that and plan my trips with my dog in mind. Would I replace my dog when she dies? That is a tough question that I cannot answer now! Benz.
 

Gary Stevens

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I keep two containers just for the dogs, one is for food, the other leashes, that include 2 six footers, 2 fifteen footers and one 30 footer. This box includes collasable water bowls, (2). I also now use paper plates for the food, to difficult cleaning up rubber food bowls. All have ID always on them, and I have pet insurance. Dogs are chipped. Sometimes I add camp site info to the ID. I also carry LED collars. It is amzing how they dissapper into the night and people just don't see them on the attached bright colored leash. I have two German Shepherds and my experience has been to be more careful at night. During the day my big guy is approachable. Recently during the dead of night I had a group of people cut through my camp site. They walked right into Tiger who did not take that well. They mostly pissed themselves.
 
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000

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My Pudelpointer Maggie always goes on our trips. Though she is well trained, I keep her ecollar that she wears for bird hunting on her when camping to be able to quickly recall her if necessary and it has led lights that I can turn on remotely in case I can’t see her at night. Another thing that has made camping with her even better is bringing her own chair. She likes sitting around the campfire with everyone in her chair and she is trained to stay in her chair when I need her to. This means less wandering around when I’m focused on something like cooking, or if a vehicle is driving by or people are walking near our camp I can have her wait in her chair so I know she’s not going to get hurt or bother anyone.



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Kevigizmo

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My Pudelpointer Maggie always goes on our trips. Though she is well trained, I keep her ecollar that she wears for bird hunting on her when camping to be able to quickly recall her if necessary and it has led lights that I can turn on remotely in case I can’t see her at night. Another thing that has made camping with her even better is bringing her own chair. She likes sitting around the campfire with everyone in her chair and she is trained to stay in her chair when I need her to. This means less wandering around when I’m focused on something like cooking, or if a vehicle is driving by or people are walking near our camp I can have her wait in her chair so I know she’s not going to get hurt or bother anyone.



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Mighty fine looking hound there!
Certainly looks to be enjoying it!!
 
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professorkx

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I have a small dog, and she has ridden the Harley, dual sport motorcycle, Jeep off-road, overland and everything else with me for her entire 12 year life. I know, I know, big biker with a fuffy dog, but where I go, she goes, and she makes a lot of biker and Jeep friends, but then, she like people a lot more than me.

Great advice in the original post. Plan for your 4 legged friend just as you plan for yourself...probable better.

Abby on the Harley.jpg
 

CDN Offroader

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Also remember certain off limit areas for pets. On our Newfoundland trip, the dog was good to come on most of our hikes, but the climb at Gros Morne National Park was off limits as it is a caribou birthing area. Luckily found a reputable kennel to watch him for the day.
 

Dario Carrera

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Our dog Orion travels with us from time to time. Sadly we can't take him with us everywhere, but we do our best to bring him along with his safety measures and some of his comforts. He loves it!

22319516392_292b265a4d_o.jpg

IMG_1065.JPG
 

drrobinson

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I definitely respect the different opinions here on pets. To each his/her own. Personally, we take the dog on trips where she is allowed and will be comfortable. In Colorado there are some areas where we hike that don't allow dogs so she stays home.

I'd add one more thing to the OP's original list of concerns, Safety. Years ago, I had the unfortunate experience of stopping to help at an accident where one of the drivers was unconsolable. Her dog had been killed in the accident, flying from the back seat of her Honda Accord to the windshield. That has always stuck with me, and we have tried to take some simple precautions for our dog. She rides in the very back of the Xterra with a Raingler full height net, or in the middle with a car safety harness tethered so she can't fly forward in the event of an accident. Definitely not perfect, but better than loose.
 

chexmix

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This is an old thread and TLDR.

Just wanted to share photos of overlanding with my dog!





The dogs were even relaxed when a wolf walked up! And you read this on the internet so you know that was a real wolf!
 

Caligirlnic

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Anywhere I go, my dog goes. That's just how it's always been. I can't stand to leave him and he's a good co-pilot. Although, he's no good with navigation or taking over driving. I have him trained rather well so I never have to worry about him wandering off. He keeps me company and ensures that we're taking breaks as needed. He takes up less space overall with himself and his gear than a human passenger would.
What if you have to leave your dog while your on the trail either hiking or biking? What do you do?