Overlanding with a CPAP; Power options?

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John~SWNM

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So the VA recently diagnosed me with sleep apnea (after a quick couple questions) and gave me a nice new CPAP device (which I'm still gtting used to). They tell me I could be OK for a night or two without using it, but for trips over a couple nights I really shouldnt go without it.

So what options do I have to power the damn thing while out & about in the wilderness? Solar? Small generator? Other?
(Right now I'm considereing a small system from Goal Zero or similar).

I am open to suggestions but please remember I am on a fixed income and limited budget so the solution has to be reasonable. As of now I am not running a dual-battery setup in my truck.


*Edit* : I'd especially appreciate advice based on exerience with various products.
 
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reaver

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I've used this combo a couple of times. It works well if you turn off the heated hose, and the humidifier.

The first time I used it was in 20 Temps at night. It's cold on your face, but I got two full nights, and still had some juice in the battery afterwards.



Then you just need a DC power supply for whatever cpap machine you have.
 

John~SWNM

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Saw this at Expo East earlier this month but it seems the price has gone up substantially.
yeah that's bit pricey but seems very compact & easy to pack. Thanks.
 

John~SWNM

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I've used this combo a couple of times. It works well if you turn off the heated hose, and the humidifier.

The first time I used it was in 20 Temps at night. It's cold on your face, but I got two full nights, and still had some juice in the battery afterwards.



Then you just need a DC power supply for whatever cpap machine you have.

Seems the photo's didn't attach.
 

reaver

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Seems the photo's didn't attach.
It should have been Amazon links.

Basically, it's just a TalentCell dc battery pack and a DC to 12v auto accessory plug, which you may or may not need, depending on the DC power supply you use for your cpap.
 
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Rick Schlepphorst

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I have a CPAP and I use a Goal Zero Yeti 150 that I got pretty cheap on Ebay. I can get two or three nights out of it depending on the weather. I don't use the humidifier, and I don't use the 110 transformer, just a cable that runs from the Yeti straight to the CPAP machine off the 12V outlet. I recently picked up a 50 watt solar panel and cable to charge the Yeti but haven't taken that out yet. All told I am in about $200-225 for the whole setup, and so far it has worked really well for camping.

I am hoping the panel will top off the Yeti during the day so I can stay out as long as I want, and also keep my phone and my GZ lanterns charged.
 
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DrivingTacoLoco

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Saw this at Expo East earlier this month but it seems the price has gone up substantially.
I bought one there. I'll be really testing it this weekend.
 
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slomatt

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The key is to run the CPAP off of DC and not through an inverter. Many manufacturers sell a DC-DC converter that plugs into a cigarette lighter plug. It is also helpful to turn off any extra features such as a humidifier, heated tube, etc if possible.

Something like a FLEXOPOWER LITHIUM444 battery pack should be able to run most CPAPs for multiple nights. I've managed 6+ nights in my testing.
 
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John~SWNM

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The key is to run the CPAP off of DC and not through an inverter. Many manufacturers sell a DC-DC converter that plugs into a cigarette lighter plug. It is also helpful to turn off any extra features such as a humidifier, heated tube, etc if possible.

Something like a FLEXOPOWER LITHIUM444 battery pack should be able to run most CPAPs for multiple nights. I've managed 6+ nights in my testing.
Good to know. I need to see if I can get a DC adapter for it.
 

old_man

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All the cpap's I have had over the last 20 years had a 12v input and I only had to fab or buy a cord to connect it to the battery (cig lighter)

Note: running the humidifier on most will limit you to the inverter route and radically up you power draw. I find the humidifier isn't usually needed because you are sleeping in a confined space and the humidity naturally increases.
 

oldmopars

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I can tell you from experience that it is not that complicated. My wife and I both have CPAPs. I have traveled on my motorcycle with my CPAP. I used a 12V plug and attached it to a second motorcycle battery and charged it using the bikes charging system. I had no issues, I just did not use the humidifier.
Now in my truck with my wife and I, I wanted to see if I could power both with the humidifier on. I use a 12V 100Ah battery. My CPAP will run off the 12V, but my wife has one that is 19V. So, I have a small inverter for hers, and mine is direct. The battery will last 2 nights with no charge, or indefinitely being charged from the trucks charging system. Keep in mind this was 2 full nights, both running with humidifier and one off an inverter (Inefficient) plus lights, phone charging, and a LED night light for my wife.
It is really easy and cheap. My adapter cord was under $30. The battery was the most at about $100. I already had the battery and the small inverter from other projects, but the inverter was maybe $35.
Don't over think it or over spend. It is not hard at all and it should not stop you from getting out there and having fun.
 

CTO1Mike

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Quite literally picked up mu CPAP yesterday! Did a quick google for "12v cpap" and came up with this option.
Cpap 12v adapter kit.
So I may be investing in a portable battery set up soon.
 
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I've never had good luck with lithium batteries (except LiFePO4). Goal Zero's power stations are ridiculously expensive. There are plenty of cheaper off-brand options out there, but for big power while camping I recommend tossing a Group 31 battery into an ArkPak. Not only do you avoid the dangers of Lithium batteries, but you don't have to throw the unit away once the battery craps out on you - it uses standard automotive batteries. The price per watt-hour is much, much better, it can be tied into your vehicle as a removable dual battery system, it's an easy solar hookup, and you can use it to power a freezer/fridge, lights, and whatever in addition to your CPAP for days and days.
 
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