Map books or gps system

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Justin_0237

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So basically what I am asking is what kind of maps are you guys using for off-roading. Are you using a map book that has all the little detailed back roads of forests or are you using something like a handheld Garmin? i have a handheld garmin but was wondering if a detailed map book would be better to work with. Thanks all for your input!
 
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expeditionnorth

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USGS topo maps & compass if the GPS fails

I feel everyone ought to know how to read a map, its really simple

& what happens if the gps device fails when you are in the middle of no where ?
 

Justin_0237

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Thank you so much for the references @ric im going to look into getting me a topo map of ca to keep in the truck. And you are right @mike I've always thought about that. Sometimes the gps runs out of service so I just drive without really knowing much haha.
 

UKCRD

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I keep maps with just in case but also use a GPS, a handheld GPS with compass and an iPad with Garmin external GPS receiver. The Garmin really speeds up the iPad and is especially useful on the road together with the TomTom app.

http://4wdx.com/garmin-glo-external-gps-glonass-receiver/
 

eric.ryan.davis

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I'm a big fan of the Backcountry Navigator app for Android. One downside is you need to download tiles ahead of time if you will be away from cell service. I'm still trying to figure everything out on it as it's a pretty steep learning curve though.
 

Robert OB 33/48

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Hello,

Iam using Mappoint and TTQV. And now a days Memory maps. For the trip to Morocco we will use paper maps as well. and a Garmin GPS handheld for back up.
 

Justin_0237

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Cool I'm going to look into all those options. I usually use a garmin GPS while getting to the destination than my handheld to get me around. But I figured maybe there is more detailed backcountry maps out there and it looks like there are by what you guys are saying. Thanks a lot!!
 

Cappy410

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For me here in Canada I use TopoMaps Offline on my iPad and a Garmin GPS. I hard to find a good backroads book for Alberta. Maybe I'm not looking hard enough.
 

Michael

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I use DeLorme for Norther California, and I really like "Guide to Northern California Backroads and 4-Wheel Drive Trails". PRetty specific to my area though.

M
 

Mad Garden Gnome

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I plan with Gaia GPS and Google Maps online.
I use Gaia GPS on phone and tablet in the field, however, I am always set up to fall back on compass and printed paper maps.
 

deeker

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I have my maps in a 3-ring binder, with each map in a plastic sleeve. I can show people where I'm going and ask questions about camp sites, etc.
I also use the Backroad MapBook for the region I am traveling in (Ontario, Canada for the most part). I find them to be quite helpful.
I use a GPS on the trail to track my route for KMZ files after and to see where I'm currently going. I will often input waypoints or markers just to give an idea of my speed and destination for the day.
 
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toxicity_27

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I'm a big fan of the Backcountry Navigator app for Android. One downside is you need to download tiles ahead of time if you will be away from cell service. I'm still trying to figure everything out on it as it's a pretty steep learning curve though.
I've heard good things about BCN and it's prompted me to download it to check it out.
 

roamingtimber

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I'm a big map guy. Something about laying out a big sheet of paper is easier to me than gps. I keep a gazetteer in my truck at all times, then take more detailed topo maps for specific trips. I also have a garmin handheld for hiking and hunting that I'll pull out if needed though.
 
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Bushdriver

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Tracks 4 Africa is our best option for Southern Africa. They have a great download for your Garmin as well as excellent waterproof paper maps. You are invited to geocache your trip off the Garmin. Then you info is collaborated for everyone else to rear realistic travel times.
Tip: Add minimum of 30% to the time suggested for a route to give a bit of photo time and to avoid ripping your kidneys out on roads that are no longer maintained in Southern Africa. NEVER plan to travel between dusk and dawn in Africa!

Definitely use both 1: Map and Compass 2: GPS

Another African challenge is that names of places, roads, provinces, rivers and any other conceivable landmark are changed with the winds of political change. Don't expect all the signage to be up to date.
 
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old_man

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If you are heading to Colorado or Moab, I highly recommend maps from Latitude40 in Nederland, CO. They are printed on heavy weight water proof paper in shaded relief color. Besides being accurate, they are so nice I hang them in my office.

www.latitude40maps.com

I always carry maps. GPS is good for finding where you are on the map, but to me looking at a map sets it in my mind and I don't have to hassle with the technology while driving.
 
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Pilgrim

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Like Deeker up above, I've always roamed Ontario with paper maps. I've got a box of maps for all the lands I've travelled at home. The Backroads Mapbooks are great in Canada, showing all the minutae for off-the-beaten-path. I've mainly used a GPS to see exactly where I am, and projected down the road with the paper map. I did this while on x-country motorcycle trips too. Paper. No dead batteries, no signal loss, not expensive.
 

Stickbow

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DeLorme Atlas, sometimes printed larger scale Topo maps. Google earth, and since mid-August Gaia on my phone or tablet (if my tablet is working worth a crap at the time). I have an old Garmin hand-held GPS that will no longer update and a compass (know how to use both...) to figure out where I am - and where I should be going -- on a map if need be.

I prefer printed maps, to be honest, but am slowly converting to digital. The issue is the law prohibiting touching electronic devices in Georgia -- need a mount for the tablet in my LR Disco and phone in my pickup truck.