Hatchet or machete?

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genocache

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I am looking to get a new hatchet to replace my Fiskars, fiber handled one. I've been online looking for American made and came upon the Woodmans pal machete; Emergency Survival & Outdoor Brush Clearing Tool - Woodman's Pak

Anyone have one and yer thoughts? Or a traditional hatchet for those camp uses, kindiling, tent stakes, small branch lopping, throwing at small animals and children, Just kidding on the last one!
 

Cypress

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I carry both, both are two different tools.
This is my answer as well.

I have had a Fiskars splitting ax and a hatchet for 6-8 years without handle failure and the ax has split piles of firewood. By far the best tools for the job.
 

Correus

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Is there a specific reason you want a modified, jungle fighting bolo as opposed to a hatchet and machete?

I have two hatchets - one with a hickory handle I've had for over 30 years and one with a metal handle I've had for about 20. Wooden handles are easy to replace.
 

bgenlvtex

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Have you actually broken one of the Fiskars or is this a perceived weakness. My experience with them is that they are far more durable than a conventional wooden handle, with the benefit of being inexpensive.

If you want USA made, Council tool should meet your needs in the axe/hatchet department. I prefer a Silky Big Boy saw in any case where it can be used as it is lower effort and safer than chopping through particularly with dry would that is hard. Axe/hatchet accident can leave you in a very precarious position medically. If processing short sections of dry wood for use in a "camp stove" a saw shines.
 

G.Goodwin

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Why don’t you like your fiskars?
Not that I don't like it, but the handles tend to break and you can't replace the handle.
If it’s a Fiskars, then it has a lifetime warranty. I have not heard of breaking a handle. I loved the one I had a few years ago and never had an issue. Wonder if their quality has gone down over the last few years
 

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That looks very awkward to yield compared to both a hatchet and a machete. I carry both, both are two different tools.
This has been my typical assessment as well. I have a cheapo, local Army Navy store type machete, and I have an Estwing solid steel 14 inch "Sportsman's Axe" hatchet with leather wrap handle. Love it. How can one tool be heavy and robust enough to be a hatchet, and thin and light enough to be a machete?

Having said that, I took a look at the OP's link. This Woodman's seems like a versatile tool. Standard issue since WWII? Might be worth taking a look at. $175 is a lot to spend when I can get that Estwing for $30 and a machete for another $30 for a decent one, that's still less than half the price of the Woodman. The Estwing is also US made.

I'm on the fence. But if I had neither hatchet nor machete, and found a (used?) Woodman for $70 or $80, maybe even $100, I would get the Woodman. But $175 seems like it went into hipster lumberjack money.
 

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This has been my typical assessment as well. I have a cheapo, local Army Navy store type machete, and I have an Estwing solid steel 14 inch "Sportsman's Axe" hatchet with leather wrap handle. Love it. How can one tool be heavy and robust enough to be a hatchet, and thin and light enough to be a machete?

Having said that, I took a look at the OP's link. This Woodman's seems like a versatile tool. Standard issue since WWII? Might be worth taking a look at. $175 is a lot to spend when I can get that Estwing for $30 and a machete for another $30 for a decent one, that's still less than half the price of the Woodman. The Estwing is also US made.

I'm on the fence. But if I had neither hatchet nor machete, and found a (used?) Woodman for $70 or $80, maybe even $100, I would get the Woodman. But $175 seems like it went into hipster lumberjack money.
It wasn’t standard issue while I was in the Army... in fact I never saw one, even while I was deployed with special forces... I looked for it in the NSN database and couldn’t find it either... so I’m not sure how true that statement is.
 

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I second the use of a good saw for a lot of chores one might use a hatchet, and Silky Saws are the best.

Quicker, easier, safer (especially if alone), less maintenance than a hatchet, though I have a nice one for splitting and making kindling.

I tried different Silky Saws, though chose a Silky GomBoy Curve for gathering and trimming firewood, mostly because it has a great belt-mounted carry case that I can operate with one hand, even gloved, and is easier on my belt when riding. All the wood strapped to my bike in the image below was processed with the Gomboy Curve (210mm curved blade or 240mm straight).

If doing more trail work and regularly processing larger wood, the Big Boy (360mm curved and straight) like Bruce has is a best bet.

sondorsx-silkysaw-packmule-2-800.jpg
 

genocache

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Thanks for the responses!

I do have an Estwing axe with the metal handle had it for 20 years, but don't like to take it camping. I have not personally broken a Fiskars, but within the last 6-8 months have read of 2 that have broken. Yep that Woodmans if big $$$, it looks to travel well size and shape wise and do a fair amount of camp chores. I too carry a folding hand saw. So I guess this thread is more of an intelligence gathering one.
 

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It wasn’t standard issue while I was in the Army... in fact I never saw one, even while I was deployed with special forces... I looked for it in the NSN database and couldn’t find it either... so I’m not sure how true that statement is.
They were issued in WWII. They were first used by the US Forestry Service before the war and then the military decided to use them. The Military designation is LC-14-B. A handful of companies made them for the military. To my knowledge they were intended for use in the heavily wooded areas of the Pacific theater as a survival tool, not sure about Europe, but I know the Army did have some. As far as I know they weren't issued as much after WWII, but saw action again in Vietnam. They are still listening amongst the blade inventory within the US military.
 
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trikebubble

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Have you actually broken one of the Fiskars or is this a perceived weakness. My experience with them is that they are far more durable than a conventional wooden handle, with the benefit of being inexpensive.

If you want USA made, Council tool should meet your needs in the axe/hatchet department. I prefer a Silky Big Boy saw in any case where it can be used as it is lower effort and safer than chopping through particularly with dry would that is hard. Axe/hatchet accident can leave you in a very precarious position medically. If processing short sections of dry wood for use in a "camp stove" a saw shines.
2nd the nod for the Silky Big Boy folding saw. It's amazing, and super compact. I also have a medium sized Fiskars axe, and a medium sized machete. They all have their own roles, and all get used. I personally wouldn't want a single Swiss-Army hatchetesaw thingie. If my one item breaks or gets lost, then i have nada but my good looks to rely on.
 
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ThundahBeagle

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I second the use of a good saw for a lot of chores one might use a hatchet, and Silky Saws are the best.

Quicker, easier, safer (especially if alone), less maintenance than a hatchet, though I have a nice one for splitting and making kindling.

I tried different Silky Saws, though chose a Silky GomBoy Curve for gathering and trimming firewood, mostly because it has a great belt-mounted carry case that I can operate with one hand, even gloved, and is easier on my belt when riding. All the wood strapped to my bike in the image below was processed with the Gomboy Curve (210mm curved blade or 240mm straight).

If doing more trail work and regularly processing larger wood, the Big Boy (360mm curved and straight) like Bruce has is a best bet.

View attachment 189922
I agree a saw is safer. Less waste as well if cutting firewood
 
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bgenlvtex

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Thanks for the responses!

I do have an Estwing axe with the metal handle had it for 20 years, but don't like to take it camping. I have not personally broken a Fiskars, but within the last 6-8 months have read of 2 that have broken. Yep that Woodmans if big $$$, it looks to travel well size and shape wise and do a fair amount of camp chores. I too carry a folding hand saw. So I guess this thread is more of an intelligence gathering one.
Here you go OP. Council Tool Hudson Bay


Moore enfermayshun her
 
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BensonSTW

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I have broke a Fiskars splitting maul. Knotted up juniper round. I took the biggest heaviest swing I could manage. I missed. Handle hit the block and broke. Definitely not the axes fault. Went in and ordered another. By far my favorite axe. When I called fiskars all they wanted was an emailed picture and they sent me a brand new one. I ordered one because I didn’t know their customer service would be that good, so now I have 2. Then I cut all the plastic off the broken head and have an awesome wedge.