Has overlanding become elitist ?

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Jaxx

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Thanks for the replies, you all are awesome. One reason I joined Overland bound was for community. I DO get out there as much as I can sorry if I didn't mention that. Me n my '99 Buick do what we can. Honestly, I don't go out with other overlanders yet because I'd be embarrassed with my car. And I am NOT camping in bear country in a ground tent LOL
99 Buick sounds like a great rig to me, I think you should start a you tube page on how to overland on a budget ??
I’m not a rich guy at all So I totally get what your saying. I joined this page in hopes learning what works for others but from what I have seen , I can’t afford to overland like most but that’s not going to stop me.
PS never but embarrassed about your rig ... your out there doing it !
 

Dave K

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I saw this article and immediately thought of this post/question. It is as humorous as it is true and slightly depressing, all at the same time. Enjoy!

You had to read a how to article?! Pshh. You’re never going to make elite in this game kid.

Lol! (Article was pretty funny though)
 

Norcaldude707

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Like any hobby we participate in and consume...they're going to be elitists. For instance, like the cooler debate of Yeti vs. Rtic. Then you have the folks in the middle of the spectrum and the bare minimalist. Overland has definitely got way more attention in the past year. Such attention with a huge contribution from social media is innovating new gear for our vehicles and kit to camp with. All that exposure and hype will definitely bring in elitists. I have one trip down so far, and it was done with a stock F150 4x4, camp gear, and a ground tent. One of the best experiences I've had in a long while, and gave birth to this new passion I have to explore. The experience of hitting trails that majority of vehicles can't traverse and hanging out with my friends was what sparked this passion. So to make a long statement shorter. Overland should be what you want it to be on any budget as long as you can make it work.
 

FrankRoams

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This question and all the ones like it that have been asked in dozens of other hobbies and will continue to be asked until the end of time. All have one answer and are all the same questions for one reason. People! As long as people are part of a hobby, so will it's complexity and branching niche subgroups and trends and everything in between. You do you. :grinning:
 

grubworm

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This question and all the ones like it that have been asked in dozens of other hobbies and will continue to be asked until the end of time. All have one answer and are all the same questions for one reason. People! As long as people are part of a hobby, so will it's complexity and branching niche subgroups and trends and everything in between. You do you. :grinning:
True. And its still Tundra. :)
 

David C Gibbs

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Nope, I was called lots of names for owning an 88-62 Series LandCruiser, I was a Uppie, a DINK, and now a grumpie... Since the daily driver, 312,000 original owner miles on it.

The Mrs. & I just returned from a 2 State, 2 Province trip - into B.C., Alberta, back into Montana and home in Idaho. The Tacoma TRD-Offroad, DC, SB handled everything we put it through... It needs a 2nd bath and detail, to get the mud out of places I didn't catch the 1st time. 2738 miles, in 10 days. Two travel tanks averaged 25.+ mpg. Worst mpg was from Flathead Lake to Drummond, 18.00 mpg. Saved $ because I budgeted 19.5 and several tanks were at 22.3, and 23.2. Still working on the recap. What a trip! I discovered stuff not on our radar...Now it is. Can't wait to go back and explore more.
 
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grubworm

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Nope, I was called lots of names for owning an 88-62 Series LandCruiser, I was a Uppie, a DINK, and now a grumpie...
DINK--Double Income No Kids
Grumpie....hummm....I call my wife a "grumpie" and she drives a '13 jeep sahara. i think a grumpie is a fussy wife, no matter what they drive. Like: Sometimes I wake up grumpie...but most times I let her sleep....
 
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Anak

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This is one of the many reasons I don't fret over what someone else has in terms of gear. Operating as a 1 income, 3 kids family is whole 'nuther ball game. Our prioties and choices are deliberate and we are content with what those mean for us in terms of what we can and cannot afford. Those who have chosen different paths are welcome to the pros and cons of their choices. Everyone gives up something in order to achieve their goals.
 

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Saw a review of the 2020 Defender today. Very nice and certainly a vehicle I would love to have, BUT, the fully tricked out version is over $80 K which is a little rich for my blood. It's easy to see how owning such a vehicle could give you the feeling you are just a little bit better or more fortunate than the other guy so it's an easy slide into being an elitist. I drive an '88 Bronco that I have resto-modded to being a vehicle that provides exactly what I want for overland, camping, fishing trips etc. While I would love to experience the luxury of a new Defender, I would also be afraid of damaging such a large investment while traversing the american outback. Of course, I don't really want to scratch the new Bronco paint job either but that truck is paid for and is a fairly large investment by itself. So is over-landing becoming an elitist activity? Yes, it is for those with money to burn. Do they have more fun in their shiny new toys than I do in my old Bronco? Very unlikely.
 

Lanlubber

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Saw a review of the 2020 Defender today. Very nice and certainly a vehicle I would love to have, BUT, the fully tricked out version is over $80 K which is a little rich for my blood. It's easy to see how owning such a vehicle could give you the feeling you are just a little bit better or more fortunate than the other guy so it's an easy slide into being an elitist. I drive an '88 Bronco that I have resto-modded to being a vehicle that provides exactly what I want for overland, camping, fishing trips etc. While I would love to experience the luxury of a new Defender, I would also be afraid of damaging such a large investment while traversing the american outback. Of course, I don't really want to scratch the new Bronco paint job either but that truck is paid for and is a fairly large investment by itself. So is over-landing becoming an elitist activity? Yes, it is for those with money to burn. Do they have more fun in their shiny new toys than I do in my old Bronco? Very unlikely.
Your not alone. Many OB'ers are in the same shoes, I'm one of them. Personally I get my kicks building the older rigs especially knowing I'm going out in the boonies to challenge them. While others may spend $60+ to go boondocking, I would never do it even if I had the money to do it. That's just not me. I'll bet I have just as much fun as they do and a whole lot less tears and anxiety.
 

MOAK

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This reminds me of a gal out on elephant hill years ago. Her husband had just put a large dent in the drivers side rear quarter panel of their brand new LR3. She could be heard screaming at him from far off. I didn’t realize what I was hearing until the small group pulled up for lunch at Devils Kitchen, just outside our campsite. She was ranting away. I felt sorta bad for the guy cause she just didn’t let up. Obviously a very healthy relationship. Money really doesn’t buy shit.
 
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smritte

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That's funny.
I have a similar but opposite story. I was leading a "beginner" trail ride at a 4wd event with about 30 rigs. I had 3 brand new H1 Hummers (two were shiny black)and a new Grand Cherokee. I kind of cringed when I was walking the line up checking the rigs and making sure everyone was ready and aired down. I thought "gawd I hope they don't get mad about the scratches they will get on this route ( I did cover possible miner damage at driver meeting)This was a mild drive in the desert about 2 levels harder than a dirt road with a few low rock piles. At lunch break I discovered that one of the Hummers some how caved in a rear quarter panel. Not sure how he did that but there it was. The funny part was the Hummers and the Cherokee were actually friends and relatives. The wife was the one who dented the Hummer and her comment was "OH Well" stuff happens. Its a good thing we own a Jeep/Hummer dealership. After back at camp, they sought me out and thanked me for a great trail ride and asked about other slightly more difficult trails they could go play at.
I guess it's all how you look at it.