Do you carry bolt cutters?

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Billiebob

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One thing to consider if you cut the lock and leave the gate unsecured. The guy whose lock you cut might come back with a excavator and dig a 10' ditch plus a 5' pile of rock.

All too often signs like these get ignored.

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rgallant

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Gates are a problem everywhere, they are open when you go through and closed an hour later. The big issue here on the coast in BC are the ante-logging nut bars and other dips who think damaging equipment worth 100' of thousands of dollars is a lark. As a result many logging companies put up gate and there is often no way to check for open and close times.

If they want to stop you this is typical



And the road past the main obstacle

 

Apoclapedia

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Most gates in my area have locks that are recessed and cant be accessed by cutters. But having been a firefighter I always carry cutters, axe, halligan. None are particularly useful for recessed locks. But there are two proven options. The first is take a piece of cable and unwind it. Then Thread it through the lock and braid it back together in a loop. Then put a hook through the loop and jerk it open with your rig. Or for $30 you can buy a set of picks and rakes and open any pad lock in about 15 seconds with a bit of practice. I carry all of those. Im fanciful as to choice, and like to keep my options open. Im not looking for trouble, but get caught on the wrong side of a bad snow storm or wildfire and it becomes a “time is life” situation. A gate isnt about to turn me around.
 

Overland_TRD

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Weird. While most replies don't necessarily imply any nefarious intention behind cutting locks. It still is weird to me that some people are willing to rely on bolt cutters to ingress/egress areas where they may not even be allowed to be?

I think that this should be an essential part of trip/route planning... Contacting rangers in the district you will be traveling in is not hard and it is a common part of their job. I highly suggest people try it out and not be intimidated or feel like it's outside of the Rangers' lane to help people plan.

It's probably safe to assume that they would prefer a phone call over a cut lock.
 
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Overland_TRD

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I can imagine what that fine would be getting caught. A Ranger I was talking to said they use trail cams to catch offenders and illegal dumping. That’s why we go prepped to spend an unforeseen night camping.
But If you get locked in, how do you know you’ll only be there one night? Couldn’t it be several nights?

Plus, isn’t it the ranger’s responsibility to make sure a road is clear prior to locking a gate?


I think it's the travelers responsibility to make sure they are using the road or route within the established limitations set in place by the Rangers.... This should be done prior to entering a gated area, or you must be willing to absorb that risk of the gate being locked if you didn't do your due diligence.
 

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Another consideration if you get pulled over and are caught with things like bolt cutters, pry bar, hammer you can get hassled or worse because they assume your going to burglarize. This is more likely in the city but I've been questioned a few times about cutters and slimjims at traffic stops
Do you have bolt cutters and a slimjim sitting on your lap during a traffic stop? How would an officer even know that you have those things if they were properly stored away from plain sight?

For me, I often do carry bolt cutters. Then again, I often have a set of mechanics tools as well. When I have the diamond deck toolbox in the bed of my truck, they are in there. I chain my kayaks when stored outside, same with an extra set of wheels I have. Just having bolt cutters isnt illegal anywhere that I know of.

And i agree. If you do get totally stuck, cutting the chain is often easier than cutting the lock
 
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Boostpowered

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Do you have bolt cutters and a slimjim sitting on your lap during a traffic stop? How would an officer even know that you have those things if they were properly stored away from plain sight?

For me, I often do carry bolt cutters. Then again, I often have a set of mechanics tools as well. When I have the diamond deck toolbox in the bed of my truck, they are in there. I chain my kayaks when stored outside, same with an extra set of wheels I have. Just having bolt cutters isnt illegal anywhere that I know of.

And i agree. If you do get totally stuck, cutting the chain is often easier than cutting the lock
If the police are looking for someone breaking into vehicles or stealing equipment and a police officer pulls you over and for any reason sees something out of place they will go through your vehicle and find them then you have to explain to the cop why you have them and how it looks to them isn't good especially if your vehicle is already full of stuff that looks like it may or may not be stolen. When you have the tools of the trade they will take it that your the perp they are looking for.

It used to be common sense to not carry those types of things unless you were a contractor, locksmith or criminal.

You make me feel like I'm trying to explain to a Californian or coloradan etc why you can't carry a bag of dope on you outside your state. It's common sense or at least it used to be.
 
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Downs

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I carry bolt cutters for this reason, and full tools, bailing wire, etc.

I've gotten locked inside supposedly open gates/roads in the National Forests in CA more than a few times. I'd much rather deal with the lock/chain/fence than having to go massively off trail or off designated roads in most situations.

My favorite thing out here in our national forests is to see a gate off the main road on one route.. then end up being stuck on the other side of said gate later in the day after exploring all day. Like. What's the point?
I hated the gates in Southern California, the closer you got to the border the more closed gates you would encounter. You would ride/drive down a road hit a locked gate that you could loop around on more traveled roads and drive right up to on the other side. They said they did it to help control movement on the FS roads and funnel traffic though BP Checkpoints. After about a year I had a pretty good feel for what gates were and weren't locked and it made it much easier to navigate then but it was frustrating to be 10-20 miles down a trail/road run into a locked gate that required you to backtrack that same distance and go around 30 or 40 miles just to wind up right back at that same gate from the other direction.
 

ThundahBeagle

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If the police are looking for someone breaking into vehicles or stealing equipment and a police officer pulls you over and for any reason sees something out of place they will go through your vehicle and find them then you have to explain to the cop why you have them and how it looks to them isn't good especially if your vehicle is already full of stuff that looks like it may or may not be stolen. When you have the tools of the trade they will take it that your the perp they are looking for.

It used to be common sense to not carry those types of things unless you were a contractor, locksmith or criminal.

You make me feel like I'm trying to explain to a Californian or coloradan etc why you can't carry a bag of dope on you outside your state. It's common sense or at least it used to be.
Boost, if something looks out of place, that's on the driver of the vehicle. If an officer is looking for a thief who used bolt cutters to steal x, they are allowed to keep an eye out for bolt cutters and anything on the list of stolen items, such as x.

Unless you have some other illegal item or substance (again in plain view) in your car, or unless they have you and your vehicle on video cutting the block and stealing x, then those both have to be in plain sight before they can even think of searching your vehicle without a warrant, especially any separate locked areas, just at a vehicle stop. In the United Stated, that might not be common sense, but it is Constitutional Law. Probable Cause. Reasonable suspicion. In the Fourth Amendment realm.

Common sense is not having stuff that "looks like it may or may not be stolen" AND boltcutters sitting within view and reach. You might save yourself a lot of heartache by stowing things away properly, out of sight and locked, is what I'm saying.

You make me feel like I'm explaining to a 16 year old with a new drivers license, why they shouldnt have an open container of beer in the car full of friends, even though they "aren't the one drinking it."
 
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ThundahBeagle

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Last I recall, one does not need a permit to carry bolt cutters - either concealed or open carry.
One does not. When one runs into trouble, evidently, is when one has them on his lap, along with various sundries which may or may not "look" like they've been recently "liberated", during a random traffic stop. If I am understanding one correctly
 

Boostpowered

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Boost, if something looks out of place, that's on the driver of the vehicle. If an officer is looking for a thief who used bolt cutters to steal x, they are allowed to keep an eye out for bolt cutters and anything on the list of stolen items, such as x.

Unless you have some other illegal item or substance (again in plain view) in your car, or unless they have you and your vehicle on video cutting the block and stealing x, then those both have to be in plain sight before they can even think of searching your vehicle without a warrant, especially any separate locked areas, just at a vehicle stop. In the United Stated, that might not be common sense, but it is Constitutional Law. Probable Cause. Reasonable suspicion. In the Fourth Amendment realm.

Common sense is not having stuff that "looks like it may or may not be stolen" AND boltcutters sitting within view and reach. You might save yourself a lot of heartache by stowing things away properly, out of sight and locked, is what I'm saying.

You make me feel like I'm explaining to a 16 year old with a new drivers license, why they shouldnt have an open container of beer in the car full of friends, even though they "aren't the one drinking it."

Dang so wrong I'm right
 

ThundahBeagle

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Dang so wrong I'm right
So? So right, you are wrong. It comes down to intent. But even before that, the police have to SEE it. Here's a tip: keep the bolt cutters in a separate, locked toolbox. When they cant be seen, they aren't questioned. Get it?

Put it in the tool box, with other construction or mechanic tools, close it and lock it. Then behave on the road. Cant be opened without reasonable suspicion or a warrant, wont even know it's there anyway.

"Best way to avoid punch, no be there!"

- Mr. Miyaggi
 

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Sort of.

Most of those laws are written so that possession of burglary tools while committing a crime is unlawful. You can have it and carry it except when breaking the law. I drive around with just about everything on the list, including lock picks, and massive rings of keys. Since I'm not a criminal, I'm not too worried about it.

And yes, I carry a set of bolt cutters and a battery grinder with me at all times, as well as any other common tool needed to repair a vehicle.
 

ThundahBeagle

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Exactly my point. A simple screwdriver is on that list. If you use that in commission of a crime it becomes either a weapon or a burglary tool, depending how you have used it. But they aren't stopping construction workers from carrying them, nor are they stopping random people on the street on the off chance they have one in thier pocket.
 

Boostpowered

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Example: I can have freeze plugs for a chevy and a d cell Maglite flashlight sitting in my barn its not illegal to buy or own either of those items and they both have their own intended uses that in no way is illegal, yet if I had them near one another in the barn and the atf showed up for a ffl audit they would arrest me for intent to manufacture a silencer. It's the exact same thing it don't matter how legal you think you are.
 

Boostpowered

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Please share what your legitimate reason for bolt cutters and a slim jim is, what are you telling the cops it's for?

Do you have a locksmith license and do mobile locksmithing? Are you a general contractor? Do you own a self storage business?
Tell em your cutting locks on forest road barriers and se how that goes.
 
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