Compromise

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Musubie

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,479
Los Angeles
The Big C word, and even though all of our vehicles are compromises of some sort, none of us like to own up to it at first. Myself, I drive a Subaru, and I'll be the first to tell you that it is a compromise. I can't clear rock ledges or boulders, I have no low range, and my suspension articulation is limited, but the creature comforts, the safety afforded by Eye Sight and RAB, the adaptive cruise control, the relative (more on this below) efficiency of even the 3.6R make up for a lot of the downsides.

I got to thinking about this when I was surfing the web with a friend and we stumbled upon the recent unveiling of the 2019 Chevrolet Blazer.

Now the one thing that I would dearly love would be an SUV version of the Duramax ZR-2. That would be a minimally compromised overland vehicle for me. But when I saw the unveiling my hopes evaporated. That Blazer is not a Blazer--it is a fancy. . . Equinox. Why would Chevy do that to a storied nameplate when they have the ZR-2 on which to base an SUV named 'Blazer?'

That of course got us talking. What would be the ideal overland vehicle with the least amount of compromise? He chose a 4-Runner, but as much as I want to like them, I couldn't buy one. My body doesn't fit 4-Runners/Tacomas, and let's just say that coming from a TDI that I sold back to VW (damn them for that cheat!), I just can't go back to sub-20 mpg 'economy.' My 3.6 Outback gets 27-28 on the highway, although what I have planned for it will see that number drop to 25 maybe. Not good. But at least not horrible. Once you get used to a diesel's 600 miles of range, it really is hard to go back to filling up every 400 or so miles. Ouch.

So I'd have to go with a diesel. But I really do love the SUV body style. And we here in the US know full well that there ain't no such thing as a diesel SUV unless you fancy overloading in a poncy Jaguar F-Pace.

"In that case," I told my pal, "I'd consider an old Land Rover Defender 130 or Mercedes-Benz model 461 G-Wagen (the LWB from 1990) with a retrofitted Cummins 2.8." And from then on the wish list grew. He'd want a Toyota Land Cruiser 70 Troop Carrier like Andrew St. Pierre White has. That huge V-8 diesel is, however, heavy, thirsty, and really fills the engine bay. I prefer light, efficient, and small. I do like that AluCab Hercules ASPW has, though. I'd put one on, certainly, even if it meant ripping the roof off of a Defender 130. I believe they call it the Icarus for LRs.

Of course Chevy could've just made a real Blazer out of the ZR-2 . . .

But all of that raises the question: where do you run into compromise with your overloading vehicle? What did you have to give up to gain what you wanted? What's your idea of a least-compromised overloading rig?
 

toxicity_27

US MidWest Region Member Rep
Member

Pathfinder I

2,528
Minnesota
Member #

0656

Mine is mileage and payload. Although this JKU gets the best mpg of any vehicle I've owned. The payload is abysmal. I, like your friend, would love a 78 Troop Carrier. I'm starting to dig the 200 Series as well, but don't think I'll ever own one.
 
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Hella-Buggin'

Rank I
Member

Contributor II

241
SF Bay Area
Member #

8225

I have a JKU and am pretty happy with my rig. I'd like bigger tires, but that would hinder my everyday ability. I put on a caged roof rack so I can actually carry enough supplies for the family for a few days, but that has decreased my gas milage and highway speeds. I compromised daily comfort for a vehicle that is a pretty capable off road machine. Does it suck in bumper to bumper traffic in the SF Bay Area?, yes... but I use the time to think about the next adventure.
 

Lindenwood

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Advocate II

2,522
Ft Walton Beach, Fl
First Name
Jacob
Last Name
McDonald
Member #

2636

Gas mileage. Otherwise, our 4Runners do exactly everything we need of them. My 3rd Gen is a bit louder than her 5th Gen, but I think that is a common complaint even before the armor and tires.
 
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Anak

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,271
Sandy Eggo
NO!!

Not the "C" word!!

That is a downright dirty word.

Step one is to get past the idea that you have to make everything work with just one vehicle. This is why I have both the Jeep and the Suburban.

Lamentably, neither one is a diesel. (I hear you loud and clear on that subject.) I would love to convert the Suburban to a Duramax. Chevrolet should have made this an option. Morons. See the new Blazer. Morons. The Jeep I would like to convert over with either a Mercedes diesel (mechanical) or perhaps even the new Cummins retrofit. But alas, I live in California. More morons. But this I can at least solve by moving.

One step at a time. But that "C"-word just doesn't cut it. It is just a matter of steps required in order to finally reach the objective.

Now if I can just get The Bride on board we can get to work on outfitting a Deuce and a half.
 

Musubie

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,479
Los Angeles
NO!!

Not the "C" word!!

That is a downright dirty word.

Step one is to get past the idea that you have to make everything work with just one vehicle. This is why I have both the Jeep and the Suburban.

Lamentably, neither one is a diesel. (I hear you loud and clear on that subject.) I would love to convert the Suburban to a Duramax. Chevrolet should have made this an option. Morons. See the new Blazer. Morons. The Jeep I would like to convert over with either a Mercedes diesel (mechanical) or perhaps even the new Cummins retrofit. But alas, I live in California. More morons. But this I can at least solve by moving.

One step at a time. But that "C"-word just doesn't cut it. It is just a matter of steps required in order to finally reach the objective.

Now if I can just get The Bride on board we can get to work on outfitting a Deuce and a half.
I'm with you on the different-vehicle-different-application rationale. My DD is not the Subaru--it is a VW e-Golf, which is almost a perfect city car (and yes, alas, I do have to live in the city). The Subaru gets taken out only once in a while, but when it does, it racks up 500-2,000 miles per trip, which is when those comforts and safety features come in handy.

Really surprised that the Suburban doesn't have a diesel option, too. A perfect application for the big Duramax, I'd say.