72h Bag - Go/Deploy kit

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Lars

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I want to start by saying I'm not looking for a "Zombie Apocalypse" Get out of dodge bag. More specifically I volunteer with ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) and RACES (Radio Amateur Emergency Service)

Both organizations may deploy me as a communicator to an area that's not home to help with communications during, or after a disaster. (Here in central Texas wild fires aren't uncommon.)

I'm starting to put together a list of things for a 72h deployment bag for 1 person. The idea is to be self sufficient for up to three days, and not add any burden on the other people and services responding to the event.

So far I'm looking at the following items.
  • Good Wipes - shower alternative
  • 5 Gallon Aqua Tainer
  • Kean Kanteen 16oz
  • Life Straw (I keep one of these in the truck too, just in case)
  • 2x 3 day supply of 3600 Calorie bars
  • Emergency Sleeping Bag
  • Mylar Thermal Blankets (2)
  • Dynamo/Solar weather radio, with phone charger
  • 300 lumen LED flash light
  • 2x LED Camp Lanterns
  • Extra batteries for my Handheld Radio
  • Sun Screen / Bug spray
  • leatherman & pouch
  • Fire steel
  • wind/water proof matches
  • sighting compass & pouch
  • fixed blade knife
  • 2x 8'x10' tarps
  • 100' paracord
  • Adventure Medical Kit 2.0 (1-4 person first aid kit)
  • Mylar Thermal Tube Tent
  • 6 pairs of socks
  • 2 pairs of rugged pants
  • 3 columbia camping shirts (long sleeve to keep the sun off.)
  • 1 pair of hot weather rugged boots
  • 1 Wide brim hat

What have I overlooked?
 

roamingtimber

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I have something similar, I call it my 48hr bag. It fits in a stiff sack and goes with me whenever I go hiking or anything where the tires leave the pavement. I'm a SAR volunteer and the idea is that as long as I have that bag I'm good for at least 48hours in the wilderness alone. Your list looks pretty good, I would add a warm beanie, something like a shemagh, nitrile medical gloves, preferably long cuff ones, a fool proof kindling like vasoline soaked cotton balls, a head lamp, work gloves and a waterproof jacket. What I did was look at the 10 essentials, the expanded it and tailored it to my needs. I have a waterproof note pad and pen, a gps, a spot satellite messenger and a couple of glow sticks on mine too, also a few heavy duty safety pins for field repairs and spare batteries for everything that uses them. I tested my kit, I took just my 48 hour bag, threw it in a back pack with the normal stuff I would take on a day hike, like a light insulating layer and a couple of liters of water and spent the night just below the tree line on a mountain in the fall. I learned what I needed and what I didn't and made a few changes. I was a bit cold in the middle of the night but besides that good to go.
 
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WUzombies

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I want to start by saying I'm not looking for a "Zombie Apocalypse" Get out of dodge bag. More specifically I volunteer with ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) and RACES (Radio Amateur Emergency Service)

Both organizations may deploy me as a communicator to an area that's not home to help with communications during, or after a disaster. (Here in central Texas wild fires aren't uncommon.)

I'm starting to put together a list of things for a 72h deployment bag for 1 person. The idea is to be self sufficient for up to three days, and not add any burden on the other people and services responding to the event.

So far I'm looking at the following items.
  • Good Wipes - shower alternative
  • 5 Gallon Aqua Tainer
  • Kean Kanteen 16oz
  • Life Straw (I keep one of these in the truck too, just in case)
  • 2x 3 day supply of 3600 Calorie bars
  • Emergency Sleeping Bag
  • Mylar Thermal Blankets (2)
  • Dynamo/Solar weather radio, with phone charger
  • 300 lumen LED flash light
  • 2x LED Camp Lanterns
  • Extra batteries for my Handheld Radio
  • Sun Screen / Bug spray
  • leatherman & pouch
  • Fire steel
  • wind/water proof matches
  • sighting compass & pouch
  • fixed blade knife
  • 2x 8'x10' tarps
  • 100' paracord
  • Adventure Medical Kit 2.0 (1-4 person first aid kit)
  • Mylar Thermal Tube Tent
  • 6 pairs of socks
  • 2 pairs of rugged pants
  • 3 columbia camping shirts (long sleeve to keep the sun off.)
  • 1 pair of hot weather rugged boots
  • 1 Wide brim hat

What have I overlooked?
I would lighten the load a little. 1 lantern, 1 pair of pants,2 shirts, 4 socks.

Why 2 tarps? For shelter or for other needs? For shelter you only need 1 to make an open lean-to with ground cover. I'm not a fan of fire steel, I like my flint and steel pouch with char, but I did frontiersmen/mountain man reenactment back in the 90s so I'm weird.
 
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Overland-Indiana

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@Lars
Check this out:
Section V: Emergency Rations

One thing I personally would reconsider is the food choices you have listed, is this a "last resort/backup" bag or is it going to be how you live in the event you get called out? Reason I ask is, you can get some really good Mountain House meals that only require hot water that are much more tasty than those bars. There are tons of freeze-dried foods that taste pretty good and only require hot water. Or, toss in a few MRE's to give you some variety. Nothing is worse than being in any kind of emergency situation and then hating the food you have and barley being able to keep it down...ask me how I know! lol The vast majority of those emergency bars taste like lightly flavored wax. Make sure you taste the foods you put in there BEFORE an emergency, this way you know you can eat it.
 
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Overland-Indiana

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Oh, I'd also beef up the med kit. The one you have listed may be more than what I am picturing but med kits and the training to go along with it are priceless in the event you arrive and there are people hurt that need assistance. I built a med bag and keep it in my rig at all times. My wife has one in her car too, we are both trained and have our CPR certifications and I have taken basic/intermediate first aid/first responder courses. The knowledge gained in there was priceless.. If I remember correctly @WUzombies is ex-police? if I am correct then I am sure he has had some more formal training in first response to car accidents and other medical things. He may be able to chime in on the first aid section..

I am not dogging on your list, i think it is a solid foundation, just needs minor tweeking!
 
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Lars

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Wyldwood, TX
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I have something similar, I call it my 48hr bag. It fits in a stiff sack and goes with me whenever I go hiking or anything where the tires leave the pavement. I'm a SAR volunteer and the idea is that as long as I have that bag I'm good for at least 48hours in the wilderness alone. Your list looks pretty good, I would add a warm beanie, something like a shemagh, nitrile medical gloves, preferably long cuff ones, a fool proof kindling like vasoline soaked cotton balls, a head lamp, work gloves and a waterproof jacket. What I did was look at the 10 essentials, the expanded it and tailored it to my needs. I have a waterproof note pad and pen, a gps, a spot satellite messenger and a couple of glow sticks on mine too, also a few heavy duty safety pins for field repairs and spare batteries for everything that uses them. I tested my kit, I took just my 48 hour bag, threw it in a back pack with the normal stuff I would take on a day hike, like a light insulating layer and a couple of liters of water and spent the night just below the tree line on a mountain in the fall. I learned what I needed and what I didn't and made a few changes. I was a bit cold in the middle of the night but besides that good to go.
I forgot to add the First Aid Kit to the list above, although it was in my Master. This covers the Nitrile gloves.
Kindling, headlamp, work gloves, and a waterproof jacket are all things I forgot and will add to my list.

I keep a wool beanie in the truck. I'll add one to the list for the kit as well.

Small compass that doesn't require power.
This is another omission for the the above list that made the master list, but a good catch.

I would lighten the load a little. 1 lantern, 1 pair of pants,2 shirts, 4 socks.

Why 2 tarps? For shelter or for other needs? For shelter you only need 1 to make an open lean-to with ground cover. I'm not a fan of fire steel, I like my flint and steel pouch with char, but I did frontiersmen/mountain man reenactment back in the 90s so I'm weird.
For Socks it comes down to, I have sweaty feet, and can't stand them being wet in my boots. I'd rather carry more than necessary if at all possible.
Dropping to one pair of pants, and two shirts however is a change I can make, and will adjust.

Two tarps for an overnight shelter, and a spare as a wind block for the radio operating station if necessary.



If I do actually deploy to a disaster, it likely won't be with zero notice, at which point I'll likely grab at least the tent box from my overlanding kit, if I don't need it great, but I've got a pickup with plenty of space to haul crap. :)

Thanks for the suggestions and additions guys! Keep them coming please.
 

Lars

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@Lars
Check this out:
Section V: Emergency Rations

One thing I personally would reconsider is the food choices you have listed, is this a "last resort/backup" bag or is it going to be how you live in the event you get called out? Reason I ask is, you can get some really good Mountain House meals that only require hot water that are much more tasty than those bars. There are tons of freeze-dried foods that taste pretty good and only require hot water. Or, toss in a few MRE's to give you some variety. Nothing is worse than being in any kind of emergency situation and then hating the food you have and barley being able to keep it down...ask me how I know! lol The vast majority of those emergency bars taste like lightly flavored wax. Make sure you taste the foods you put in there BEFORE an emergency, this way you know you can eat it.
Also good advice. I was going to order one of the 3 day emergency rations kits and try eating nothing but that for three days just to see how it goes when it doesn't matter :) I had considered MREs and or Mountain House Meals, but wasn't sure how large they are to pack. I'll have to head up to REI and or one of the Surplus stores this week to investigate.

Oh, I'd also beef up the med kit. The one you have listed may be more than what I am picturing but med kits and the training to go along with it are priceless in the event you arrive and there are people hurt that need assistance. I built a med bag and keep it in my rig at all times. My wife has one in her car too, we are both trained and have our CPR certifications and I have taken basic/intermediate first aid/first responder courses. The knowledge gained in there was priceless.. If I remember correctly @WUzombies is ex-police? if I am correct then I am sure he has had some more formal training in first response to car accidents and other medical things. He may be able to chime in on the first aid section..

I am not dogging on your list, i think it is a solid foundation, just needs minor tweeking!
The little med kit for the go bag is because it's small and will fit in the pack easily, as well as in a cargo pant pocket. If my truck makes it to the event, which it almost certainly will I have a very small Emergency Trauma kit in the truck, in addition to the AMK Mountain Series Fundamentals kit which is a lot more complete. Next month I'm taking the Wilderness Medicine class at REI to add some formal training for things beyond the Trauma Medical class I took with a firearms instructor which focused primarily on GSW care.

Thanks for the solid adivce!
 

Overland-Indiana

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Also good advice. I was going to order one of the 3 day emergency rations kits and try eating nothing but that for three days just to see how it goes when it doesn't matter :) I had considered MREs and or Mountain House Meals, but wasn't sure how large they are to pack. I'll have to head up to REI and or one of the Surplus stores this week to investigate.



The little med kit for the go bag is because it's small and will fit in the pack easily, as well as in a cargo pant pocket. If my truck makes it to the event, which it almost certainly will I have a very small Emergency Trauma kit in the truck, in addition to the AMK Mountain Series Fundamentals kit which is a lot more complete. Next month I'm taking the Wilderness Medicine class at REI to add some formal training for things beyond the Trauma Medical class I took with a firearms instructor which focused primarily on GSW care.

Thanks for the solid adivce!

Awesome! Glad to see your taking the steps to have the medical knowledge to help yourself and others!

Mountain House are actually pretty good IMO, and not to big in size to pack and they are light weight.

MRE's are kinda bulky, I break mine down...or, "Field Strip" it. This way it takes up a LOT less space. Here is a YouTube video on how to do it:
 

Lifestyle Overland

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Great topic! I just recently shared this as a safety message during our weekly staff meeting and it was an eye-opener for a lot of my co-workers. It really hit home since we just recently dug out of a blizzard here in Southeast New Mexico which left grocery store shelves bare.

I think your list looks great. Once you cover all the essentials, the rest is gravy.

I'm attaching the 72 hour checklist pdf from FEMA for others to reference while building their kits.
Here is the site link: http://www.ready.gov/kit
 

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jdunk

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It's likely common sense around here, considering the content of the forum. But I feel that it's worth mentioning...

Anything cotton should be removed and replaced with non cotton alternatives. It holds oder, and it takes forever to dry. when it's wet, your better off being naked than wearing it.
 

roamingtimber

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I would advise against MRE's while they are convienet, thy are bulky and heavy. They come with a lot of crap you don't need, like toilet paper and Tabasco sauce. Mountain house meals are great, pack smaller and lighter, but you do need a way to boil water for them. They are probably better tasting too. If you do go the MRE route, check the calories on them, a lot of people think you need 3 in a day, depending on the MRE's you pick, you could get chubby while responding.
 

WUzombies

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I would advise against MRE's while they are convienet, thy are bulky and heavy. They come with a lot of crap you don't need, like toilet paper and Tabasco sauce. Mountain house meals are great, pack smaller and lighter, but you do need a way to boil water for them. They are probably better tasting too. If you do go the MRE route, check the calories on them, a lot of people think you need 3 in a day, depending on the MRE's you pick, you could get chubby while responding.
MREs are perfectly fine, you just have to strip them. Since some of my prepper book characters strip MREs in their go bags, I made a video a while back showing how it is done. As for my arm, that's while still recovering from a complete bicep tear tackling a burglar, which was my last patrol action before leaving full time for good.

 
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WUzombies

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Oh, I'd also beef up the med kit. The one you have listed may be more than what I am picturing but med kits and the training to go along with it are priceless in the event you arrive and there are people hurt that need assistance. I built a med bag and keep it in my rig at all times. My wife has one in her car too, we are both trained and have our CPR certifications and I have taken basic/intermediate first aid/first responder courses. The knowledge gained in there was priceless.. If I remember correctly @WUzombies is ex-police? if I am correct then I am sure he has had some more formal training in first response to car accidents and other medical things. He may be able to chime in on the first aid section..

I am not dogging on your list, i think it is a solid foundation, just needs minor tweeking!
You're right, I was a full time officer for nearly 10 years.

First you have to make the distinction between first aid kit, trauma kit and medical responder kit.

A first aid kit would have things like some ACE bandage wrap, Vet wrap, bandaids, Advil, Benadryl, some bandages of various sizes, tweezers, instant ice packs and such. Basic "I cut myself" or "I sprained an ankle" sort of thing.

Trauma kits are like what I put together on the chest rig/bail out rig while on patrol (while a motor I had to slim it down to fit in saddlebags). I had QuikClot, Israeli bandages, turnaquit, some 550 (like 10ft, gutted), Vet wrap, large gauze pads, two tampons (seriously, great for plugging a gun shot wound), CPR valve mask, EMT shears and gloves. That was on the MOLLE webbing of my chest rig with the spare mags for my AR and pistol, along with another knife. It was specifically put together for active shooter, critical incident responses where such injuries would occur. Some of those things remain with my current setup in the van.

Medical responder kit will have a LOT of extra stuff, there's a reason why EMS runs onto the scene with a large shoulder bag or two. The list is extensive, but they include a space blanket, airway intubation tubes, plastic bandages for sucking chest wounds...it goes on and on. They also have the training to use it all.

The most important part of your kit is your training!

People never rise to the occasion in high stress situations, they always fall back to their highest level of proficiency achieved through training. Not their highest level of training, their highest level of proficiency from their training. So it isn't enough to go to classes, you must practice.

With that said I beat the medics to a lot of scenes (especially as a motorcop since we would split traffic running code), CPR doesn't always work, sometimes there's nothing you can do and at times. There are some memorable quotes along with many of those scenes, I'll spare you since it's a special brand of humor that first responders use to keep their sanity, but it is where I started saying "well there's your problem" when I got to the worst part of a scene.
 
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Iubootgater

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Topics like this are a big reason for being a member. Living in the midwest it is easy to be complacent about things like supply and first-aid kits. It would be a rare occasion that you would be trapped by elements or injury in our part of the world without being able to get help relatively fast, spaces are small and overpopulated.
That is no excuse!
Reading post from members who are fortunate to wonder in the more extreme regions keeps me on my toes and I thank you.
 
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roamingtimber

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@WUzombies i like you stripped down MRE idea. I've never thought about removing all the excess crap. I can't agree with you more on Training being the most important piece of any first aid kit. CPR Masks are a great addition. I assumed this was more of a personal use kit than something to be treating others, but you can get some really small key chained sized one time use masks that would be a great addition. Quick-Clot bandages are great, I think the powder needs to be used by some one with training, same with a tourniquet. My SAR unit does not authorize their use unless you are an EMT, my military training says otherwise, but really it comes down to you. Med kits alone can become huge, figure out what your individual needs are and go from there. Is it personal use or are you treating others, how many days are you relying on it, what's the weather going to be like, what are your size and weight restrictions? Spend a night in the woods with just your kit, what didn't you need, what did you wish you had? Work from there. Maybe someone should do first aid kit and big out bag as topics in "Getting Started in Overlanding."
 

Lars

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Topics like this are a big reason for being a member. Living in the midwest it is easy to be complacent about things like supply and first-aid kits. It would be a rare occasion that you would be trapped by elements or injury in our part of the world without being able to get help relatively fast, spaces are small and overpopulated.
That is no excuse!
Reading post from members who are fortunate to wonder in the more extreme regions keeps me on my toes and I thank you.
I grew up outside Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and then spent 11 years in Indianapolis so I can relate to this. We had tornadoes, but they are usually very localized with regards to damage. We got proper snow storms, but the state had enough equipment to clear most of the important roads in only a few hours. Now that I'm out here in Texas it's a different story.

Although the primary reason for my kit is a little different, that doesn't mean it won't make it into the truck bed tool box, and live there 24/7/365.25

@WUzombies i like you stripped down MRE idea. I've never thought about removing all the excess crap. I can't agree with you more on Training being the most important piece of any first aid kit. CPR Masks are a great addition. I assumed this was more of a personal use kit than something to be treating others, but you can get some really small key chained sized one time use masks that would be a great addition. Quick-Clot bandages are great, I think the powder needs to be used by some one with training, same with a tourniquet. My SAR unit does not authorize their use unless you are an EMT, my military training says otherwise, but really it comes down to you. Med kits alone can become huge, figure out what your individual needs are and go from there. Is it personal use or are you treating others, how many days are you relying on it, what's the weather going to be like, what are your size and weight restrictions? Spend a night in the woods with just your kit, what didn't you need, what did you wish you had? Work from there. Maybe someone should do first aid kit and big out bag as topics in "Getting Started in Overlanding."
I also like the stripped down MRE, and will likely pick up a few styles to try. So MREs (stripped), Mountain House, and the silly calorie bars. I'm going to try a few of each over the next couple of weeks and will share my thoughts.

@roamingtimber you're right that this kit was a personal use kit for while I'm called out to operate radios. However I think it's important to have at least enough equipment with me to handle the types of problems I might encounter on my own. I can't tell you how many times I've burned myself soldering connectors onto the end of coax, or pinched part of a finger to the point it was bleeding when trying to crimp ends. (I think this is a sign I should be more careful.), so carrying at least a simple first aid kit makes a lot of sense. Ace bandages, and a Sam Splint need to come along in the event I twist an ankle hauling crap into a rugged area (usually the top of whatever is tallest.) :)

Thanks all for the suggestions, and please let's keep the discussion going.
 

Lifestyle Overland

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@WUzombies Maybe someone should do first aid kit and big out bag as topics in "Getting Started in Overlanding."
Boom:
Overland Safety Kit: Part I - The First Aid Kit

I would love for some folks to tack on to the First Aid Kit thread with some advice on training, methods, etc. Maybe even some videos you made yourself, or one's you've found to be very helpful. Maybe @WUzombies could offer some further insight on how to prepare for the more severe injuries. (Great post above, BTW)
 
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roamingtimber

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