270 degree awnings what’s your take?

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Masis Eric

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I have just bought my first 270 awning. When I was shopping around I had several priorities factored in.
1. Price
2. Weight
3. Quality of build( must stand alone with no legs)
4. Value ( dollar vs material you received)
I found the perfect awning to fit my needs but far from a 100% perfect awning cuz such thing does not exists . What’s your priorities when it come to choose a awning.
 

Old Tanker

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Quality-Weight-Price/Value. I'm only looking for a high quality 180 due to the 4Runner tailgate. If Kinsman or Alucab made a 180 I'd buy one. Considering 23Zero or OVS.= for a 180.
 
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Masis Eric

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Quality-Weight-Price/Value. I'm only looking for a high quality 180 due to the 4Runner tailgate. If Kinsman or Alucab made a 180 I'd buy one. Considering 23Zero or OVS.= for a 180.
I have purchased Overlandpros 4K and super happy with it( it’s not without flaws ) BUT for your situation try OVS 180 I saw their products in an expo pre covid and quality build is stunning. I can’t remember what I didn’t like about 23 zero but it was a major thing . So I was in same route as you.OVS is somehow related to kings overland.
 
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Clrussell

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I just purchased a quick pitch 270. After looking and looking, debating building my own, and putting my hands on a few different ones that’s what I came up with and decided on. I know I won’t use one if it’s a pain. Under 30 second set up from unzip to completely open and done. I can’t wait to install it on the new setup
 

Dusther210

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We got a Hasika 270 from Amazon last year for $370. It works, looks good, seems decently made and to be honest seems identical to the Overland Pros wrapper 2500 V2 (but tan). I used their instructions to set up mine.

• Price and value were our main priorities followed by quality (we weren’t exactly trying to buy a one time use item here)

Although they sent us the wrong side awning Hasika gave us a good discount and the customer service was pretty good (and FAST) and ultimately I think we ended up liking it this way.

If I had to do it over again I would probably just get the Wraptor for about 100$ more just to know I can get walls that work in the future, American company, etc
 
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Masis Eric

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Nice ! “Quick pitch “ is that the name? I’ll check in it.
And yes about DIY I am with you I can build things but one it takes time and second material cost a lot And end result in some corner shows always it’s a home made stuff. Instead I work overtime for less time that it would take me to build and buy it . With exception of my road shower and battery pack I built those. If you guys wanna have prints or pictures let me know.
 

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I went with the 23 Zero Peregrine 270 awning with the LST (light blocking fabric). I have the upper tailgate problem, which is a big reason I choose this awning. It doesn't have quite the rear coverage of some of the 270's but it also doesn't have the arm that goes across the rear at an angle. The arms are straight out and along the rear so it works with upper tailgates. This thing is huge though, the coverage is amazing and it is self supporting (i usually put at least the two built in legs down because its easy.)

I bought the rear wall kit so I can enclose the rear and warm it up with a buddy heater or just add coverage if its raining and I want to work off the tailgate without any risk of rain coming in from the sides. But the coverage is pretty good off the rear considering the shape.

Great balance of weight and strength IMO. Sets up easy because its sturdy without poles, but isn't way overbuilt. The "LST" thing they have is not a gimmick. It seriously blocks all light and does amazing for blocking heat. You can't see anything even if you look straight at it with the sun on the other side.



 

Clrussell

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Nice ! “Quick pitch “ is that the name? I’ll check in it.
And yes about DIY I am with you I can build things but one it takes time and second material cost a lot And end result in some corner shows always it’s a home made stuff. Instead I work overtime for less time that it would take me to build and buy it . With exception of my road shower and battery pack I built those. If you guys wanna have prints or pictures let me know.
Yes quick pitch is the brand.
 

Thomas B

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I have purchased Overlandpros 4K and super happy with it( it’s not without flaws ) BUT for your situation try OVS 180 I saw their products in an expo pre covid and quality build is stunning. I can’t remember what I didn’t like about 23 zero but it was a major thing . So I was in same route as you.OVS is somehow related to kings overland.
Curious... what were some of the "flaws" or things you didn't like about the 4K? I currently have an ARB which I've been super happy with aside from the time it takes to setup and put away especially when I'm by myself. I'm considering a free standing awning like the 4K so would appreciate any feedback.
 

Masis Eric

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sure, my pleasure.
Dislikes are
I DO NOT TRUST ITS COVER .won’t last
1 . Could have paid little more attention to finishing details and file and sand better on aluminum work or the spots that aluminum meets cover plastic could have been protected by a rubber end cap to avoid future rubbing and tear on cover.
2. Again better finish on aluminum welding
3 . YOU NEED TO WATCH A “HOW TO CLOSE IT “ video otherwise it gets sooooo bulky in front 1/3 that can break your cover zip. No joke.
4. More color options ( personnel issue I know)
5. Again back board is khaki ,main awning is gray with red edges and stacks bag is a random color.wTF.

But I love it ! I will buy that again. I open and closed 12 to 14 times to get it right and I did.
It’s heavy duty but not 200lbs . Great for rhino sisiy rack . Hinge is like big and installation brackets are 3/8” don’t (F. )With me solid metal kind. Main awning is 280 gsm fabric feels light but edges are double sewing.

Cover is not up to rest of it .

I have purchased Overlandpros 4K and super happy with it( it’s not without flaws ) BUT for your situation try OVS 180 I saw their products in an expo pre covid and quality build is stunning. I can’t remember what I didn’t like about 23 zero but it was a major thing . So I was in same route as you.OVS is somehow related to kings overland.
Curious... what were some of the "flaws" or things you didn't like about the 4K? I currently have an ARB which I've been super happy with aside from the time it takes to setup and put away especially when I'm by myself. I'm considering a free standing awning like the 4K so would appreciate any feedback.
 

Thomas B

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Awesome! Thank you! I recently bought their shower room and definitely agree with you regarding the material used for the cover. There's a big difference between it and my ARB awning cover. I guess we'll see how it holds up. Definitely like the product though and it's much faster than setting up my privacy tent. Thank you again for the detailed response. It's very helpful!
 
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Road

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I have just bought my first 270 awning. When I was shopping around I had several priorities factored in.
1. Price
2. Weight
3. Quality of build( must stand alone with no legs)
4. Value ( dollar vs material you received)
I found the perfect awning to fit my needs but far from a 100% perfect awning cuz such thing does not exists . What’s your priorities when it come to choose a awning.
.

Amount of coverage
Durability
Flexibility in adding sidewalls or extensions
Ease of operation
Not just for sun, but for rain and cold too.

I have a BAA (big-assed-awning) and love it. I've spent too much time under single sided awnings on one side of a vehicle that don't reach far enough, don't provide enough shade as the earth turns and sun is higher, lower.

I do a lot of base camping, so prefer an awning that will do what I need throughout the whole day, for several days or weeks. Mine is considered a 360, in that it wraps both ends and an entire side of whatever it is mounted to. I have mine mounted to a rack on my trailer that I raise in camp, lower for travel.

I LOVE that it provides the coverage that it does, and regularly appreciate that I have coverage over both the nose box and tailgate of my trailer, and that I can back the van's back doors right up to the awning and open them under cover.

It is quick and easy to deploy, and quick and easy to stow.

I have triangle-shaped corner extensions that attach via 2" wide HD hook & loops (rugged even in high winds) to square off each end. My side walls can attach to both the awning and extensions. The awning and corner extensions all have an aluminized resin coating on top that helps reflect, not transmit, the heat of the sun. Even in the desert with open sides, you can feel the difference just walking under it.

The corner extensions are a breeze to attach and stake out.

basecampwithextensions_4718-1000.jpg
This config has the corner extensions added on this end. That gives me almost 16' across under cover on the end.

Without the extensions, poles are not needed. The extra weight of the large corner extensions and that they have no support arms, but just attach to the hem of the main awning, creates the need for poles. I like having the poles, actually, as it provides more stability in a wider range of weather conditions and provides also attachments points for sidewalls.

bundutec_8014-900.jpg
This give a better idea of how the triangle corner extensions attach and of the shape of the main awning. The other end is symmetrical to this one.

bibelc-190308--1517.JPG
Main awning only, no corner extensions, no poles other than one at the right end, which I had up to attach a windbreak on that side the night before, and knowing I'd probably put it back up, left the pole in place.

bundutec_7998-900.jpeg
Front side view of main awning with triangle corner extensions squaring off both ends, for close to 16' x 24' under cover.

I will sometimes back up so I know one of the rear corner extensions will be over an existing firepit, or a spot I will build a fire in my flatpack firepit, so even on a night with hard rain, I can have a fire under the awning's edge.


smokies_6535-1000.JPG
In this one, I'm just running my propane fire ring. Wicked handy to have in those places that do not allow ground fires of wood, firepits, etc.

One of my favorite things to do when base camping is to experiment with all these different configurations; walls straight down or flared out, open on one end or enclosed as much as possible, etc.

That's a lot of room under cover, with almost 8' out at awning level and more at foot level with the flare.
..
borderlandswindstorm-0206-1000crop.jpg

I'm sewing more panels; some with zippered doors for when I close things in more, some as much narrower gap fillers with HD zippers, for filling in between when I flare out the walls this much:

basecamp_2572-900.jpeg
What I've found in experimenting so much with different configs, is that you really don't need to close it in as much as you might think to stay warm, or cool. Sometimes just a wall or two on the windward, or sunny, side works wonders in increasing comfort.

The main awning zips up nicely in its own bag on the side of the rack--quicker and easier to do than you might think--and all the corner extensions and side walls fold up into a short 15" x 15" pile. The sidewalls are of a much thinner material than the awning extensions, of course.

This kind of awning certainly isn't for everyone, and because it is bigger than many, even without the extensions (almost 8' in each direction), you need to keep an eye on it in big winds. It'll take a lot, but get out in the desert with straight line winds or in the mountains with storms that are knocking out power everywhere, and you're better off folding her up, like most any awning.

Those are the kinds of things I wanted in my awning, and poked around and explored until I found what would do what I want, in as many different ways as possible. I couldn't be more pleased.

.
 
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Clrussell

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298
Arkansas, USA
First Name
Corbin
Last Name
Russell
.

Amount of coverage
Durability
Flexibility in adding sidewalls or extensions
Ease of operation
Not just for sun, but for rain and cold too.

I have a BAA (big-assed-awning) and love it. I've spent too much time under single sided awnings on one side of a vehicle that don't reach far enough, don't provide enough shade as the earth turns and sun is higher, lower.

I do a lot of base camping, so prefer an awning that will do what I need throughout the whole day, for several days or weeks. Mine is considered a 360, in that it wraps both ends and an entire side of whatever it is mounted to. I have mine mounted to a rack on my trailer that I raise in camp, lower for travel.

I LOVE that it provides the coverage that it does, and regularly appreciate that I have coverage over both the nose box and tailgate of my trailer, and that I can back the van's back doors right up to the awning and open them under cover.

It is quick and easy to deploy, and quick and easy to stow.

I have triangle-shaped corner extensions that attach via 2" wide HD hook & loops (rugged even in high winds) to square off each end. My side walls can attach to both the awning and extensions. The awning and corner extensions all have an aluminized resin coating on top that helps reflect, not transmit, the heat of the sun. Even in the desert with open sides, you can feel the difference just walking under it.

The corner extensions are a breeze to attach and stake out.

View attachment 191645
This config has the corner extensions added on this end. That gives me almost 16' across under cover on the end.

Without the extensions, poles are not needed. The extra weight of the large corner extensions and that they have no support arms, but just attach to the hem of the main awning, creates the need for poles. I like having the poles, actually, as it provides more stability in a wider range of weather conditions and provides also attachments points for sidewalls.

View attachment 191647
This give a better idea of how the triangle corner extensions attach and of the shape of the main awning. The other end is symmetrical to this one.

View attachment 191648
Main awning only, no corner extensions, no poles other than one at the right end, which I had up to attach a windbreak on that side the night before, and knowing I'd probably put it back up, left the pole in place.

View attachment 191646
Front side view of main awning with triangle corner extensions squaring off both ends, for close to 16' x 24' under cover.

I will sometimes back up so I know one of the rear corner extensions will be over an existing firepit, or a spot I will build a fire in my flatpack firepit, so even on a night with hard rain, I can have a fire under the awning's edge.


View attachment 191649
In this one, I'm just running my propane fire ring. Wicked handy to have in those places that do not allow ground fires of wood, firepits, etc.

One of my favorite things to do when base camping is to experiment with all these different configurations; walls straight down or flared out, open on one end or enclosed as much as possible, etc.

That's a lot of room under cover, with almost 8' out at awning level and more at foot level with the flare.
..
View attachment 191650

I'm sewing more panels; some with zippered doors for when I close things in more, some as much narrower gap fillers with HD zippers, for filling in between when I flare out the walls this much:

View attachment 191651
What I've found in experimenting so much with different configs, is that you really don't need to close it in as much as you might think to stay warm, or cool. Sometimes just a wall or two on the windward, or sunny, side works wonders in increasing comfort.

The main awning zips up nicely in its own bag on the side of the rack--quicker and easier to do than you might think, and all the corner extensions and side walls fold up into a short 15" x 15" pile. The sidewalls are of a much thinner material than the awning extensions, of course.

This kind of awning certainly isn't for everyone, and because it is bigger than many, even without the extensions (almost 8' in each direction), you need to keep an eye on it in big winds. It'll take a lot, but get out in the desert with straight line winds or in the mountains with storms that are knocking out power everywhere, and you're better off folding her up, like most any awning.

Those are the kinds of things I wanted in my awning, and poked around and explored until I found what would do what I want in as many different ways as possible. I couldn't be more pleased.

.
That is a big ass awning!
 
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Masis Eric

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Finally got my quick pitch installed on the truck. Very happy with the awning, install was just a quick last minute thing that will be much more solid on the next setup.
270 awnings are savers. Sun or rain you need them.Glad you find yours . See you at trails .
 

MegaBug

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23Zero Peregrine 270 here. Mounted on our Off Grid trailer. The rear cross bar means we can fully open our galley hatch and have full coverage down the driver side, over the water heater box (and shower) and around over the galley. The 2 walls give us a lot of flexibility depending on the wind direction.
Construction is very stout and setup/take-down times are fast. The fabric is heavy and fully blocks the sun and, more importantly for our part of the world, beads the rain right off.